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Vol. 12, No. 2,946W - The American Reporter - July 23, 2006



On Native Ground
JOHN KERRY'S BLUES
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- John Kerry figured he had the Democratic Party's presidential nomination all sewn up. [MORE]

Commentary
FDA'S FAILURE ON MERCURY-TAINTED FOODS IS CALIFORNIA'S OPPORTUNITY
by Andy Peri

SAN FRANCISCO -- Recent controversy over the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's mishandling of mercury warnings in tuna only further strengthens the urgent need for the state of California to adequately warn consumers of the dangers of mercury-contaminated seafood. [MORE]

Make My Day
I DON'T BELIEVE IN THE LITTLE DRUMMER BOY
by Erik Deckers

Christmas is one of my favorite times of the year. My birthday, my anniversary, and any other occasion where someone gives me presents are also big favorites. [MORE]

Momentum
A LEADER TO LEAD U.S. ALL
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- This is what I want for Christmas: a country united, and a leader who leads us all. That's all. [MORE]

The American Reporter
Hails and Salutes

100 Years of Flight
1903 - 2003

Opinion
IS IT TIME TO OVERRULE THE SUPREME COURT?

by Jeff Milchen

BOZEMAN, Mont. -- I'm two states removed from California, and I don't know who I'd have supported in San Francisco's recent runoff election for mayor. But I do know this: democracy lost. [MORE]

Opinion
AUTH CARTOON BEGETS CHARGES OF ANTI-SEMITISM, FAIRLY OR NOT
by Ahmed Bouzid

WAYNE, Pa. - On July 31, 2003, nationally syndicated cartoonist Tony Auth, who is based at the Philadelphia Inquirer, published a cartoon critical of the 'Separation Wall' that showed the star of David made out of barbed wire enclosing Palestinian populations. The cartoon immediately created an uproar within the Jewish community in Philadelphia and nationwide and raised the usual hackles of anti-Semitism against the cartoonist. [MORE]

Opinion
IN CONTEXT OF HISTORY, SADDAM'S CAPTURE HAS SIGNIFICANCE
by Rabbi Daniel Lapin

SEATTLE -- How should Jewish and Christian Americans of faith view Sunday's historic capture of Saddam Hussein? Most of us project the core elements of our own self-image onto an imaginary big screen, which then displays our larger world-view. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WHEN 'JENNY KISSED ME' THRILLED A TEEN
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Humming or whistling a song absent-mindedly often goes on until someone might say: "Can I tie up that tune for you? It's got you in knots." [MORE]

Breaking News
POWELL HAS SURGERY FOR PROSTATE CANCER
by Joe Shea

WASHINGTON, Dec. 15, 2003, 9:50am -- U.S. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, the symbol of his country's diplomacy as well as the diversity of its leadership, will undergo surgery for prostate cancer at Walter Reed Army Meeical Center in Washington today, MSNBC reported. [MORE]

SADDAM CAPTURED NEAR TIKRIT; IRAQIS JUBILANT
by Joe Shea

FROM NEWS SERVICES, Dec. 14, 2003 -- Saddam Hussein, the feared and despotic ruler of Iraq for more than two decades, was captured alive at a rural farmhouse by the U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division Wolverine Combat Team No. 1, a unit of the United States Army's Task Force Iron Horse, near his birthplace of Tikrit at about 8 p.m. Baghdad time Saturday night, the head of the Iraq Authority said Sunday morning. [MORE]

Analysis
SADDAM'S GONE, BUT IRAQ IS STILL A QUAGMIRE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The capture of former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein on Sunday was a great coup for the United States. [MORE]

On Media
POLITICAL REFORM AND THE INTERNET MEDIA
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- In a republic that prides itself on a free press as the defender of democracy, it is remarkable how little the press is willing to expose and oppose candidates who lie, distort, and otherwise sling mud in the end stage of campaigning. Attacks may come in the form of television spots or political mailers timed to arrive in the final hours before an election. In each case, the advantage goes to the candidate who has the money to carry out the attack. [MORE]

Monday Moron
DATELINE: MORON
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- Piecing together a humor-based column is difficult today given the gravity of world news we have received in the past 24 hours. [MORE]

Market Mover
AT THE MULTI-CENTER MALL OF PANAMA, IT'S CHRISTMAS-MANIA
by Mark Scheinbaum

PANAMA CITY, Panama, Dec. 13, 2003 - Both the temperature and humidity are around 85 and in full red dress uniform - hat, boots, beard, gloves - Santa Claus was waving at traffic on Avenida Balboa, and well, to be honest, as shoppers walked by they whiffed the fact that St. Nick was getting, shall we say, a little ripe. [MORE]

On Native Ground
LET 'EM EAT PEPPER SPRAY: THE 'MIAMI MODEL' FOR PROTESTERS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Comedian and political activist Barry Crimmins thinks next year will be "the summer of hate" - the moment when the opposition to everything that the Bush administration stands for will reach a boiling point. [MORE]

Media Beat
PROGRESS AND PERIL FOR U.S. GREENS
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Up against the campaign of a wealthy businessman who outspent him nearly 10-to-1, a strong progressive candidate nearly won the runoff election last Tuesday to become this city's mayor. Some national news stories depicted the strong showing for Matt Gonzalez as a big surprise. But it shouldn't perplex anyone when vigorous grassroots organizing combines with a sound strategy to get breakthrough results. [MORE]

Make My Day
I DO?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- My wife and I raised a lot of eyebrows when we first announced our engagement. I think it was especially puzzling to people, because we had already been married for three years when we made the announcement. [MORE]

Momentum
A LEFT-WING VS. A RIGHT-WING DEATH
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It seems as if no one comes fresh to new experiences these days; we're all carrying too much baggage in our minds. [MORE]

Brasch Words
WHEN HONEST REPORTING GIVES WAY TO GLITZ
by Walter Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- The relationship between the tv networks and nation's publicists is incestuous. Most guests on the morning news shows and the late evening talk shows are actors and musicians plugging their latest releases. Some of the guests, however, are writers and editors for mass-market magazines. In one dramatic example of how the news and entertainment are becoming one, NBC's "Today Show" broadcasts stories that first appeared in People magazine. [MORE]

On Media
HARSH TONE OF POLITICAL ADS HURTS DEMOCRACY
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Watching the mass media cover political advertising is like watching one of those teen horror movies. Why don't the kids come out of the basement and escape from the deranged killer? Why don't newspapers do the most obvious things to protect democracy? [MORE]

Market Mover
WAL=MART CAN'T ALWAYS BE WRONG
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- The Orange City, Fla., woman "trampled" when the doors opened at Wal-Mart causes me to reveal some "truth in advertising" about my feelings about the 800-pound, no, eight thousand pound gorilla of retailing. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SUNT LACRIMAE RERUM
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. –- When I was growing up in the Thirties in South Carolina I absorbed, along with the rest of the local culture, the rule that forbade men to cry. John 11:35–"Jesus wept"–to the contrary notwithstanding, men, real men, did not weep. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
BESIDE MYSELF
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- As the youngest of nine children, I was always so proud to sit at that table literally surrounded by brothers and sisters. One by one over the years, there became fewer of us still standing. We've lessened our number but still increased the size of the family with the boys and girls of our next generation. [MORE]

Commentary: Campaign 2004
KERRY STARS IN FACE-OFF WITH FLORIDA DEMOCRATS
by Joe Shea

ORLANDO, Dec. 7, 2003 -- Five minutes into a tough-talking stem-winder that had Florida's Democrats at their state convention here wildly cheering and waving their signs, U.S. Sen. John F. Kerry was suddenly recapturing the coveted mantle of leadership from hard-charging former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean. [MORE]

On Native Ground
TO REPUBLICANS, CRITICIZING USE IS 'HATE SPEECH'
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Republican National Committee chairman Ed Gillespie was in Vermont a few days ago to do some fundraising and spread his party's message for the 2004 campaign - to criticize President Bush is to be guilty of committing "political hate speech." [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
POOH'S GOT A NEW PAL IN DISNEY FEUD: JOHNNY COCHRAN
by Joe Shea

ORLANDO, Fla., Dec. 6, 2001 -- The man who freed O.J. Simpson from the clutches of the law in his celebrated murder case will soon go nose-to-nose with the only man who ever prosecuted Simpson successfully - in civil court - for the murders of his wife Nicole and waiter Ron Goldman - in the mutlibillion-dollar suit over royalties and future rights to Winnie the Pooh. [MORE]

Media Beat
PHEW-EE!
PEW POLL ON 'TRADE' DOESN'T PASS SNIFF TEST
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Drawing on poll numbers gathered last year, the influential Pew Research Center for the People and the Press waited until the recent trade summit in Miami to put out a report under headlines that proclaimed "Support for Free Trade" and "Miami Protests Do Not Reflect Popular Views." But a much more fitting headline would have been: "Report Conclusions Do Not Reflect Actual Data." [MORE]

Make My Day
YOU
THINK IT'S FUNNY, BUT IT'S NOT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Ask any parent about the worst part of parenting, and they'll all tell you the same thing: "I hate it when my kids get sick." The cries of "I don't fe-e-e-e-e-l go-o-o-o-o-d!" are always met with a heavy sigh, closed eyes, and a brief, but fervent prayer for strength and patience. Mostly patience. [MORE]

Momentum
BLAMING MICHAEL JACKSON ON BEETHOVEN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I may be one of the few people in the United States today who thinks Michael Jackson is innocent of child abuse. [MORE]

Ink Soup
TIRED OF THE BLUES? TRY SOME GIGGLE SOUP
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -– One of my favorite radio shows is Garrison Keillor's "A Prairie Home Companion," especially the once-a-year broadcast devoted to jokes. Consider this the first annual INK SOUP joke bonanza. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THERE'S A LOT TO LEARN - FROM ANTS
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- "There are certain things you learn by living long enough," my friend Johhny used to say, and I've learned how true that is. It only takes one sunburn for you to learn to wear sunscreen; it only takes one severe common cold for you to learn how you catch a cold; it only takes one tiring day to for you to learn what "dress comfortably" means; and, at times, it only takes one minute to learn how little you know, no matter how old you are. [MORE]

On Media
RADICAL RADIO AND ITS REBELLIOUS LISTENERS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The Pacifica Foundation runs five radio stations that are on the leading edge of dissent in the United States. Strategically located in Berkeley, New York, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C. and Houston, the Pacifica stations like to think of themselves as free speech radio. By this they mean radio that allows for the expression of ideas that are not broadcast, much less discussed seriously, on mainstream radio or television. [MORE]

The Right Side
THE FALL OF A GREAT NEWSPAPER
by Steven Travers

SAN FRANCISCO -- The Los Angeles Times was one of the finest newspapers in the world; the voice of the New West, a land of electoral votes, emerging trends and Pacific Rim power. In the Jim Murray era, they presided over the "sports capitol of the world." During Watergate, the Times maintained balance and in-depth coverage while its Eastern counterparts became spigots of anti-Nixon vitriol. However, in stages over many years, their integrity became another casualty of liberal media bias. [MORE]

Monday Moron
SCROOGED AGAIN
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA -- This week, on a very special episode of "Blossom" - check that, "Monday Moron" - I broach the subject of the existence of ghosts and all they represent. As we all enjoy Thanksgiving and the kick-off of the 2003 holiday season, we are reminded of things past, present and future. [MORE]

On Native Ground
DEAN ISN'T THE POLITICIAN WE THINK
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We still find it hard to believe, here in Vermont, that our former governor, Howard Dean, is the current front-runner for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination. [MORE]

American Sports
'A KID WHO HAD IT ALL' IS AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY
by Steven Travers

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- Marin County, Calif., is one of the most affluent, prosperous places in the world. Not only does it contain some of the richest zip codes and home prices, but its leafy environs symbolize Westernized Ivy League reverence for education and scholarship. Consequently, graduates of Marin's high schools regularly matriculate at the top colleges this nation has to offer, using their advantages and contacts to vault into great success in life. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
CALIFORNIA'S NOT-SO-SPECIAL LEGISLATIVE SESSION
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Surely one reason to give thanks right now is that you need not spend any time in California's statehouse, where the legislature has unveiled its not-so-Special Session of ugly personal behavior, nasty partisanship and utter failure to grasp the message from Republican and Democratic voters who elected Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. [MORE]

Happy Thanksgiving, Everyone!

PRESIDENT'S SURPRISE VISIT TO IRAQ DELIGHTS U.S. TROOPS
by Joe Shea

THANKSGIVING DAY -- Renewing a tradition as old as Valley Forge, the nation's Commander-in-Chief went to dinner with his soldiers at the battlefront today to celebrate the most American of holidays, the traditional feast of Thanksgiving.. [MORE]

Make My Day
THE THREE PHASES OF PARENTING
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I recently became a proud father for the third time, and although I love and adore my new son, I've noticed my standards for obsessive care and compulsive hovering have lowered quite a bit. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SOUP REDIVIVUS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE. Wash. -- Dr. Soup walked, no, make that lurched into the office the other day and started talking to us all as if he'd been here for the last few months every day. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
GOOD THINGS DON'T COME IN PACKAGES
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- No more "brown paper packages tied up in string" for me - except when I'm on the receiving end. Only 30 more shopping days until Christmas. Yes, that includes Christmas Day, when many stores are open for those last-minute shoppers - but I don't care. [MORE]

On Media
RUSH RETURNS TO A WARM WELCOME
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Rush Limbaugh's warm welcome home from the detox center this week inspires the question as to whether conservatives are demonstrating liberal values of their own or, alternatively, have been reinventing something akin to a new Victorianism, that is to say, a socially accepted hypocrisy of the ruling class. [MORE]

Monday Moron
EVERYTHING ELSE IS GRAVY
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- Well, Monday of Thanksgiving week has arrived once again. As time continues to travel at the speed of a rubber bullet at the Miami trade summit for us, it seems that Thanksgiving and the holidays come faster each year. Being in my thirties, I can only imagine how quickly the calendar must turn for the older populace. [MORE]

An A.R. Editorial
ON TO IRAN
by Joe Shea

BARDENTON, Fla., Nov. 20, 2003 -- With the revelation just minutes ago that Osama bin Laden is in Iran with his top aide and planning terrorist actions there, a critical hour in the War on Terrorism has arrived. [MORE]

In Grateful Memory
John Fitzgerald Kennedy
May 29, 1917 - November 22, 1963
35th President of the United States

On Native Ground
40 YEARS LATER, HIS PROMISE STILL HAUNTS U.S.

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - It's hard to keep from doing it. [MORE]

Make My Day
'TWAS THE MONTH BEFORE CHRISTMAS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Erik's note: In keeping with the Make My Day tradition of the past five years, I am rerunning my "'Twas the Month Before Christmas" column. [MORE]

Momentum
IT'S THE PARADIGM, STUPID
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I heard on the radio that presidential candidate Joe Lieberman is running ads in New Hampshire attacking Howard Dean for his Confederate flag comment and for not accepting federal campaign financing. [MORE]

SENATORS HEAR OF A CLUELESS S.E.C., IGNORANT INDUSTRY
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON, Nov. 18, 2003 -- Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman William H. Donaldson led off a panel of three witnesses whol told the Senate Banking Committee that the mutual funds industry lacked official oversight and internal awareness of widespread and longstanding abuses at its leading firms and their trillion-dollar funds. [MORE]


TO FLORIDA, FREE TRADE COULD MEAN A CONCRETE JUNGLE
by Mark Scheinbaum

MIAMI -- A successful Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) could bring an end to Florida as we know it. [MORE]

Ink Soup
2 LOL AND A CRITIC IN THE EXPRESS LINE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The journal that I've kept for many years occasionally provides me with a surprise or two-and the word "occasionally" is an understatement by which I try to hide from myself that I am nearly always astonished at what I read. Who, I often wonder, wrote this and why is he trying to palm it off as MY life? [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
THE WOMAN BEHIND AN OIL GIANT'S FALL
by Lucy Komisar

PARIS -- A French woman of Russian origin, armed with thousands of papers related to Yukos oil scandal, the giant Menatep business group and its offshore banking and securities dealings over the past decade, has been providing information to Russian prosecutors, the American Reporter has learned. [MORE]

Homuiny & Hash
THE TEFLON-COATED SLIPPERY SLOPE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- We now know going from the frying pan into the fire is a viable threat - assuming your frying pan is Teflon coated. Last week news camw that the presence of a complex polymer in Teflon that can be absorbed into our systems through food prepared in Teflon coated pots, pans, and baking tins. [MORE]

On Media
THE MOST ALTERNATE OF THE ALTERNATE MEDIA
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Calif. - There's night and day, there's yin and yang and there's commercial radio - and then there's Pacifica. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
AS SCHOOLS CHIEF, RIORDAN HAS TO LEAD - AND GET OUT OF THE WAY
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- I dIdn't like Gray Davis. He was a weak leader who stuck his finger in the wind to decide what to think. By contrast, I like incoming California Education Secretary Richard Riordan, the former two-term Mayor of Los Angeles recently appointed by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, and I know Riordan to be a leader with strong beliefs. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE WAL-MARTIZATION OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Americans love a bargain. That's why Wal-Mart has been so successful. [MORE]

Media Beat
IN MEDIA WARS OF BRAZIL, A DISTANT MIRROR
by Norman Solomon

RIO DE JANEIRO - After a quarter-century of intensive grassroots organizing and a victorious presidential campaign a year ago, Brazilian social movements are in a strong position as they push the Left-wing Workers Party government to fulfill its promises. The contrast to Washington's current political climate is as diametrical as the opposite seasons of the two countries. Yet Brazilian activists are now giving heightened priority to the same concern that preoccupies an increasing number of people in the United States - the imperative of challenging the corporate media. [MORE]

Make My Day
HOW ABOUT 'BIG DADDY?'
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I've always wanted a nickname, ever since I was a young boy. While I like my name, I've often wondered what it would be like to have a cool nickname. A name that would sum up my passions and interests in one simple word or phrase, like "Stein," "Wheels," or "Collectible Elvis Plates." [MORE]

Momentum
WHAT'S UP WITH YOUR FOOD, AMERICA?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Last year 12 million Americans were worried that they couldn't put food on the table, while another 58 million were classified as obese. It's hard not to wonder about America's dysfunctional relationship with its dinner. [MORE]

Reporting: Costa Rica
RATE SCAM SHATTERS COSTA RICAN IDYLL FOR MANY
By James J. Brodell

SAN JOSE, Costa Rica -- For years, a North American could get a 3 percent monthly return on dollars here. That's $3,000 a month on a $100,000 investment. [MORE]

American Speeches
WAR, SOCIAL JUSTICE, MEDIA AND DEMOCRACY
by Norman Solomon

BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil -- Editor's Note: This is the prepared text of a speech by American Reporter Correspondent Norman Solomon delivered to the Brazilian Social Forum in Belo Horizonte, Brazil on Nov. 8, 2003. I am very glad to be here to participate in the Brazilian Social Forum. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
FROM HEAVEN'S WAITING ROOM TO THE GATES OF HELL
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. - The title I'm using is rather an exaggeration on both ends; this is not Heaven's Waiting Room, nor is New York City close to being the Gates of Hell, yet I can write about each in such a way you'll believe it to be completely true. [MORE]

Ink Soup
RADIO RAVE; KUDOS FOR A FILM ABOUT HOME AND HOPE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wwash. -- How could I not go to the movies to see Radio? This new film was made in my hometown, Anderson, S.C., and claims to be a true story. Cuba Gooding, Jr. plays Radio, and deserves not an Oscar but the Nobel Prize for his impersonation of a mentally challenged young black man. Ed Harris, Coach Jones, normally an extreme monster, is here a man of such extreme charity that St. Paul himself would wonder what his little game was. [MORE]

On Media
THE (ALMOST) LAST WORD ON THE CALIFORNIA RECALL ELECTION
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- The waning hours of the recent California recall campaign included dueling dirty tricks presented to the media by both sides. The media did not come off unsullied. [MORE]

Opinion
WOULD THE FOUNDING FATHERS TOLERATE GEORGE USE?
by Doug Lasken

LOS ANGELES - Many Americans have been intrigued by the call in the Declaration of Independence for revolution under certain circumstances. It's a stateument we ought to consider on this Veterans Day, when we honor all those who died for the freedoms it promised. Here is the passage: [MORE]

Monday Moron
SELL THAT FUNKY GARBAGE WHITE BOY
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- In keeping with the motif of providing free advice for the American public, "Monday Moron" is happy to present its "Guide to the Successful Garage Sale," albeit on Tuesday, [MORE]

On Native Ground
USE ECONOMICS: GROWTH WITHOUT NEW JOBS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The 2004 election is less than a year away, and President Bush would like you to believe that the U.S. economy is on the rebound. [MORE]

Brasch Words
FAUX HUNTING IN PENNSYLVANIA
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- Tally, Ho! [MORE]

Media Beat
THE STEADY THEFT OF OUR TIME
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO - One of the worst things about today's ultramodern systems of communication is hiding in plain sight: They waste our time. [MORE]

Market Mover
BEHIND THE HEADLINES: FROM CHILE TO CHRISTMAS
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., Nov 6, 2007 -- Some investment and other items between and beyond the headlines, reflecting the views of a business-oriented journalist with too many magazine subscriptions. [MORE]

Momentum
EULOGY FOR A LOVELY CAT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- For more than five years, this was my small family: a happy husband, a happy wife, and a happy little black, white and orange cat. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SWEAT EQUITY
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wa.-Back in Princeton I used to have colleagues, people whom I saw every day in the hallways and seminar rooms and lecture halls. I still, in some sense, have them, though it is my great misfortune never to see them in the flesh-only in the feeble traces that they leave on the email screen. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
CAN ARNOLD AND BILL STOP THE SACRAMENTO MADNESS?
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- Okay, we know he's not using a police-chauffeured Hummer - it's a Lincoln Navigator. We know he cheerily tossed his huge arm around his potential enemy, Democratic Assembly Speaker Herb Wesson. We know he ate the same salmon dish at a Sacramento restaurant that oddball Gov. Gray Davis ate every day. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO GET INTO THE ACT*
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This was the first year we did not spend anything on candy for the adorable trick-or-treating goblins coming to our front door, nothing for the neighborhood children collecting loot to be dispersed by caring parents for at least the next three months. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE UNGRATEFUL PRESIDENT
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Now, after all the national media have done for President George W. Bush, the guy's complaining. "There's a sense that people in America aren't getting the truth," he says. [MORE]

On Media
THE LESSON OF THE FIRES
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- For the past week I have been watching television news coverage of the California brushfires. Not once did I see or hear mention of the one central fact about these fires that is critical to how we ought to understand and respond to them. [MORE]

Monday Moron
STAY HEALTHY WITH A CHURNING BELLY
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- I named this piece of literary insignificance "Monday Moron" for quite a distinkt purpose. (Columnist's Note: Alternative spelling courtesy of author's lack of spell-check and affinity for irony to be found in latter stages of this article. It should also be noted that such an intentional spelling blunder worked to promote the alternative rock band Limp Bizkit, although I can no longer eat Pillsbury buttery biscuits without feeling homo-erotic as a result.) [MORE]

On Native Ground
WHEN JOURNALISTS TRADE TRUTH FOR ACCESS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Before there was Jayson Blair, there was Walter Duranty. [MORE]

Make My Day
JUST IMAGINE THEM NAKED
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- What is it about public speaking that scares the bejeezus out of some people? [MORE]

Momentum
THE WORLD WAS FUN WHILE IT LASTED
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If Darwin was right, then America is doomed. [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
MURDER, VIOLENCE AND CONSPIRACY CRUSH PRESS FREEDOMS IN NEPAL
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, Oct. 26, 2003 -- Gyanendra Khadka, a journalist working for the National News Agency of Nepal, had his throat slashed by a group of Maoists. As his wife begged for the life of her husband, the rebels slashed his throat on a Buddhist altar. [MORE]

Ink Soup
PERFECT? OR WHAT?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Not often, but often enough, I am glad to have endured the ordeal of being the only major in Classical Greek at Duke. It comes in handy not only when I am trying to explain a word like "bibliophobe" to a grandchild, but also when I am trying to explain to myself what exactly it is that I believe, or do not believe. [MORE]


STARTING OVER WHEN THERE'S NO LOOKING BACK
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Lynne and Ed had just moved their family, dog and all, from Indiana to California. They were not fully unpacked when flames engulfed their new home, all escaping, the screaming children, the barking dog, just as they were - eyebrows singed from their last ditch effort to grab a box or two, not knowing if they contained pots and pans or precious memories. [MORE]

Monday Moron
MANUTE GOES BOL-ING FOR DOLLARS
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- He stands 7'7" in height, weighs about 225 pounds (the equivalent of roughly, oh, nothing for a person that tall) and hails from Sudan. He came to the United States many years ago to become, shockingly, a basketball player. After a few years at Villanova University, he went on to the National Basketball Association and launched his pursuit of the American dream with a lucrative contract and numerous endorsement deals. [MORE]

On Native Ground
AT THE NATIONAL REVIEW, VERMONT IS HELL
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What exactly is it about Vermont that moves conservatives to sputtering rage? [MORE]

Baseball
A MARLINS TALE: FROM WORST TO FIRST
by Mark Scheinbaum

MIAMI, Oct. 27, 2003 --The Florida Marlins: from worst to first in one year. [MORE]

Travel Notes
KENSINGTON: STAYING IN LONDON LIKE A NATIVE
by Lucy Komisar

LONDON -- Where would you want to live if you lived London? What neighborhood has elegance, charm, sophistication and also sense that it's for real residents, not for tourists, nor for moguls or diplomats or businessmen on expense accounts? Where do you get a sense of community, but also a location near some of the museums, royal landmarks and parks that London is famous for? [MORE]

Opinion
IT'S TIME TO STOP H.O.A. FORECLOSURES
by Harvella Jones

HOUSTON - Frustrated by laws that allow Texas homeowner's associations to foreclose on member's homes and condos for trivial violations of rules, the Texas Homeowner's Advocate Group is circulating a national petition to permanently stop them everywhere in the country. [MORE]

Make My Day
AT LEAST IT'S BETTER THAN VOICES
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- The earworm is a fascinating creature. It shows up unexpectedly and burrows its way into your brain, refusing to leave. No one knows how to get rid of it, or how it gets into your brain in the first place. It seems to feed - even thrive - on your annoyance at its repetitive mating cries. "It's a world of laughter; A world of tears; It's a world of hope; And a world of fears; There's so much that we share; That it's time we're aware; It's a small world after all." [MORE]

Momentum
COST IS NOT THE ONLY HEALTH CARE PROBLEM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We spend so much time talking about the high cost of health care that we lose sight of the system's other problems. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A LATER DUSK, AN EARLIER DAWN
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Daylight Saving Time has never meant more to me than springing ahead an hour in the Spring and falling back an hour in the Fall. It's so simple. "They" say do it April 6 and do it again October 26, differing by a day or two every year. No problem. [MORE]

Ink Soup
COOL POEMS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- Let me first, as the Brits say, declare my interest. The author of this book was a student of mine (Princeton, '98), and what is more, I read "The Book of Motion" first as his Senior Thesis in the Department of Comparative Literature. [MORE]

Outrageous Opinion
AHNOLD AND THE NEW REICH
by Lionel Rolfe

LOS ANGELES -- Ahnold is the kind of guy who forces you to think about politics. And I have to admit, I'm dealing with a prejudice. It's never failed for me - scratch an Austrian and you invariably find a Nazi. [MORE]

On Native Ground
USE ADMINISTRATION, SELLING A QUAGMIRE, FINDS FEW BUYERS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - If the ongoing U.S. occupation of Iraq has been such a success, why does the Bush administration need to manufacture good news about it? [MORE]

Momentum
AMERICA'S DEATH WISH
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So, let's see what's on television tonight? How many murders? How many rapes? How many autopsies will I see? [MORE]

Jill Stewart
L.A. TIMES EDITOR RESPONDS TO CHARGES
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- Now that the California gubernatorial recall election is over, one debate is still raging - the question of how much bias the Los Angeles Times allowed into its coverage and polls. I am offering three items below, not my normal "Capitol Punishment" column, exploring this issue. [MORE]

Media Beat
BRAND LOYALTY AND THE ABSENCE OF REMORSE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Midway through this month, a Wall Street Journal headline captured the flimflam spirit that infuses so much of what passes for mass communications these days: "Despite Slump, Students Flock to Ad Schools." Many young people can recognize a growth industry, and the business of large-scale deception is booming. [MORE]

Market Mover
THE $87 BILLION DOLLAR MISUNDERSTANDING, AND OTHER QUESTIONS
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Oct. 17, 2003 -- The Bush administration's call for $87 billion in initial additional funding to get Iraq up and running as an OPEC-rich economy has me puzzled. [MORE]


THE DECKERS FAMILY, INC.
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- To: All members of Deckers Family, Inc. From: President Daddy. RE: Yearly Evaluation Report, etc.[MORE]

Dear Employees of DFI:

YANKS DO IT AGAIN!
by Joe Shea

NEW YORK, Oct. 17, 2003 -- The hopes of a battered city rose up after midnight this morning with a towering home run blasted into the bleachers by soft-spoken hero Aaron Boone, capping a miraculous comeback that saw the New York Yankees sprint from behind late in the game against relentless right-hander Pedro Martinez and capture the American League pennant from the Boston Red Sox 8-5 in the 11th inning. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
HOW I LEARNED TO LOVE THE GAME
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Well, now, that's a title never, ever, to appear over something I write. I know, never say never, but too many years have been invested being left out to begin joining in now. [MORE]

Ink Soup

CUSTOM-MADE POSTCARDS FROM THE ILL AT EASE

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--I am subject, increasingly it seems, to tiny waking hallucinations or dreams or fantasies...whatever...to which I have given the shorthand name PFH, which stands for Postcards from Hell. Let me acknowledge en passant my indebtedness to Wallace Stevens' "A Postcard from the Volcano." [MORE]

On Media
THE MUSICAL CONNECTION
by Robert Gelfand

SACILE, Italy -- What is the connection between Bob Mitchell's 91st birthday, the silent film festival now in full swing in Sacile, Italy, and the current state of American politics? There is a common theme running through all of these and it goes right to the emotional heart of things. [MORE]

Monday Moron
WE DON'T NEED NO STINKING TREES
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- His name is Adam Roberts and he is an environmental wacko (on Rush Limbaugh's word alone, but probably for good reason). Perched (pun intended) atop his bully pulpit as a senior research associate at the Animal Welfare Institute, he recently took issue with the Bush administration's proposed changes to long-standing conservation policies concerning endangered species existing within indigent nations. [MORE]


PSSST! GOV. JEB? WHICH COMES FIRST, BIOTECH OR EDUCATION?
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Oct. 19, 2003 -- Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, has kicked off his 2008 presidential campaign with a call for the Legislature to spend $310 million to attract a new branch of California's Scripps Research Institute, and potentially 6,500 jobs. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE REPORTERT'S DILEMNA: OBJECTIVITY = PASSIVITY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - It's been two years since I was forcibly removed from daily journalism. Instead of editing a newspaper, I've been working in a bakery. [MORE]

Make My Day
THE PARENTS' CURSE
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- One of the greatest things about being a kid was the overwhelming sense of invulnerability. I was charmed. I was lucky. I was invincible. Nothing could happen to me, because I was Erik Deckers, Super Kid! And nothing bad ever happened to kids. [MORE]

Media Beat
MEDIA TIPS FOR THE NEXT RECALL
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Now that California's electorate has rewarded a dramatic recall effort, some sequels are likely elsewhere in the near future. It's a good bet that political operatives in many states will try to learn from this fall's Golden State extravaganza. [MORE]

Momentum
PAYING FOR IRAQ
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It is costing the United States approximately $4 billion every month to occupy Iraq. [MORE]

Book Review
'BUZZSAW' OR BLACK HOLE?
by Charles J. Reid

SANTA CRUZ, Calif. -- I cannot lie here. Although all Americans, indeed, every journalist, should read this book, it is going to be very difficult to write a good, compelling review of it. The best review of the "Into the Buzzsaw" is to read it in its entirety. [MORE]

Brasch Words
FACING A McBLIMP ATTACK
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- Beneath a clear blue Fall afternoon, I was lying face down on the parkway outside city hall. On top of me, cursing and screaming "They'll never take us alive!" was Marshbaum. The last thing I remembered before being hit with a flying tackle was looking up. So, I looked up again. [MORE]

Hominy & hash
WANDERING THOUGHTS ON A SLEEPLESS NIGHT
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- The pleasure of a three-hour nap early on a lazy Sunday afternoon precludes getting what we've come to call a good night's sleep. Tired enough to turn in and doze off - but, who was I kidding? My eyes popped open like the lid of a Jack-in-a-box. It's was still ten after ten and I was very much awake. [MORE]

Reporting: California Recall
IT'S GOV. ARNOLD; DAVIS 'TERMINATED' BY WIDE MARGIN
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 7, 2003 -- California voters turned out in record numbers Tuesday to oust Gov. Gray Davis by a margin of about 8 percentage points and elect Arnold Schwarzenegger as his replacement in the first successful recall of a sitting American governor since 1908. Network exit polls and late returns showed recall succeeding by about 54 to 46 percent, and with 97.1 percent of precincts reporting Schwarzenegger was getting about 50,000 more votes than Davis got against the recall, thus winning this strategic but unusual version of the popular vote. [MORE]

An A.R. Editorial
VOTE 'NO' ON CALIFORNIA RECALL
by Joe Shea

Voters and elected officials in California owe a debt of gratitude to Rep. Darrell Issa, the former car thief and failed gubernatorial candidate whose multimillion-dollar alarm business helped him fund the California recall election that will be decided tomorrow. [MORE]

On Media
A LUCKY WEEK FOR LIMBAUGH?
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- It was a lucky week for Rush Limbaugh, what with the media spotlight being on Arnold Schwarzenegger. This seems to have relieved Limbaugh, at least so far, from experiencing a media firestorm that he richly deserves. Since Sept. 28, Limbaugh has been roundly criticized for remarks he made about a black football player, was forced to resign from his position as football commentator on ESPN, and in a separate inquiry is being accused of being a big-time drug abuser. It's getting a little hard to keep track. [MORE]

Monday Moron
SUNDAY IS FAMILY FUNDS DAY
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla. -- The positive signs are beginning to make the trans-Atlantic journey with greater regularity from Iraq. Baghdad's schools are back to the business of indoctrinating students with abhorrence for the Great Satan (hey, at least they consider us great). Weapons of mass destruction have been safely vanquished to the lands of terrorist dictators to be named later. Saddam and Osama have been relegated to sharing a room at Mecca State's Omega Mu Pi fraternity house under cover of darkness. [MORE]

May Peace Be Upon Your House
Happy High Holy Days

On Native Ground
LIES AND ERRORS, NOT SPYGATE, ARE THE REAL USE SCANDAL

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I hate to sound like a Republican, but I do think the current feeding frenzy over the outing of a CIA operative by the Bush administration is overblown. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
LA TIMES COVERS UP DAVIS VIOLENCE ON FEMALE STAFF
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 4, 2003 -- I couldn't have been more shocked to see the lurid stories about Arnold Schwarzenegger and the things 11 women allege he uttered or did to them. But it wasn't over the allegations, which I had read much of in a magazine before. I was most shocked at the Los Angeles Times. [MORE]

EXCLUSIVE!
DAVIS ATTACKED FEMALE AIDE; L.A. TIMES KNEW, FORMER REPORTER SAYS
Amercan Reporter Staff

BRADENTON, Fla., Oct. 3, 2003 -- Editor's Note: AR Correspondent Jill Stewart, then a writer for New Times LA, revealed in 1997 that California Gov. Gray Davis violently attacked aides, hurled vulgarities and ashtrays at them, and "behaved badly," as Arnold Schwarzenegger described his own behavior yesterday. [MORE]

Editorial
DON'T FORGET TO DUCK, ARNOLD
by Joe Shea

Arnold Schwarzenegger will be lucky if he doesn't end up in jail before he gets to the Governor's Mansion. As of 10:57pm EST, the liberal Republican front-runner is being body-slammed by the Los Angeles Times for groping six women over the past 30 years and by ABC News for - according to an unpublished book proposal by the director of "Pumping Iron," his breakthrough weightlifting documentary - praising the achievements of Adolf Hitler. Tomorrow you can expect even worse - whatever it takes to bring down the Terminator once and for all. [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT'S WRONG WITH HALL & OATES?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I've come to the conclusion that it doesn't matter how old you are: Your parents thought your music was crap and your kids will think it's boring. It's true for anyone. We hate our kids' music, our parents hated our music, and their parents hated their music. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
CALIFORNIA'S TECTONIC PLATES, ITS POLITICAL ONES, ARE SHIFTING
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 2, 2003 -- The only things that can be predicted at this point in the frantic final days of the race to recall Gov. Gray Davis are that panic reigns inside the camps that are losing, fur will now fly with gobs of flesh attached, and the losers won't just be the three men who voters reject as governor. [MORE]

Market Mover
THE SEARS MUTUAL ADMIRATION SOCIETY
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Oct. 2, 2003 -- Sears, Roebuck & Co. was the Wal-Mart of its day, but still deserves an economic vote of confidence from American consumers. It's not just what they do, but how they do it. It's about putting its money where its corporate mouth is, and fully supporting U.S. servicemen and women. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
HOW DAVIS LOST CALIFORNIA
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Oct. 1, 2003 -- Numbers really do lie, and people using numbers lie even more, and that's one of the more profound if overlooked lessons as the movement to recall Gray Davis hurtles toward Oct. 7. [MORE]

Momentum
ACID RAINDROPS KEEP FALLING ON MY HEAD
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We live in a house that has its own well and septic system, so before we bought it, we had the water tested. Therefore, I can tell you for an actual fact that on Feb. 1, 1994, the pH content of my well was 6.5, which was acceptable, but low. [MORE]

Media Beat
UNMASKING THE 'UGLY ANTI-AMERICAN'
by Norman Solomon

In a typical outburst before the war on Iraq last Spring, Rush Limbaugh told his radio audience: "I want to say something about these anti-war demonstrators. No, let's not mince words, let's call them what they are - anti-American demonstrators." [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
CONTAMINATED CHINESE HONEY PUTS SARA LEE AND SMUCKERS IN STICKY SITUATION
by DeWayne Lumpkin

GRANTS PASS, Ore., Sept. 29, 2003 -- Two of America's best-known brands, Sara Lee and J.M. Smuckers, have found themselves embroiled in a sticky situation involving Chinese honey smuggling that has roiled the global honey industry and led to investigations and recalls. Two federal agencies and both companies acknowledge they have a problem with companies that disguise the origin of Chinese honey contaminated with a powerful antibiotic that in some cases can cause anemia, The American Reporter has learned. [MORE]

Ink Soup
YOUR HEAD HERE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--When King Edward VIII finally decided that he would abdicate, that he would rather be married to the divorced American woman than enthroned in single blessedness, and that Duke of Windsor was not such a bad title after all, the Times of London did not announce this to its readers with this headline: King to Cabinet: I'm Outta Here. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
REMEMBER THAT KID'S GAME, "RED LIGHT, GREEN LIGHT?"
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When we see a red light, we darn well better stop or pay the consequences: either a smashed fender or a stiff fine. Either way, we stop. Now, about these telemarketers. Fifty million American families signed up for the "Do Not Call" program, prohibiting sales persons from calling our homes to pitch their wares or programs or services. [MORE]

On Media
THE NEW REPUBLIC: SOMETHING WORTH READING
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- The New Republic is a very thin weekly magazine with a charm all its own. This is a journal that has been caustically critical of President Bush's economic policies, yet supported the conquest of Iraq and defended the actions of the American press in its coverage of that war. [MORE]

On Native Ground
AM I AN ANGRY LEFTY? YES, AND I'VE GOT LOTS OF COMPANY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The new buzz phrase in the news media these days is "the Angry Left." [MORE]

Passings: George Plimpton
WHAT IS A GENTLEMAN?
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- I was neither to the manner nor the manor born, but knew someone who was: George Plimpton, a friend and gentleman, who died yesterday at the age of 76. [MORE]

Monday Moron
PIGS FOR THE SKIN
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- Please be advised that the contents of this column may conjure up feelings of anger, seclusion and dismay among female readers. [MORE]

Make My Day
BUT I NEED FIVE HAMMERS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- One of the great things about being a home owner is that there is always something that needs to be repaired or remodeled. And while most home owners will agree that I've probably been hit in the head with a hammer too many times, any tool-loving Guy knows exactly what I'm talking about. [MORE]

Media Beat
'WESLEY & ME': A REAL-LIFE DOCUDRAMA
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Here's the real-life plot: A famous documentary filmmaker puts out a letter to a retired four-star general urging him to run for president. The essay quickly zooms through cyberspace and causes a big stir. [MORE]

Get Well Soon, Joyce!

California Recall
RECALL FREE-FOR-ALL DISTINGUISHES CAMEJO

by Joe shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- Here's my take on the debate watched by millions of Californians and even more other Americans tonight: It was a disaster for Gray Davis (who should have been included in it), a wash for Republicans Sen. Tom McClintock and Arnold Schwarzenegger, a total loss for independent Ariana Huffington and Democratic Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante, and a strong victory for Green Party candidate Peter Camejo. Disclosure: I left California for Florida in June. [MORE]

Momentum
WHY I LOVE STEPHANIE PLUM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Ordinarily, I would be ashamed to admit I'm a fan of Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum detective series. After all, I'm a serious person. I read The New York Times, The New Yorker and Harper's. I write about politics and world events. [MORE]

First Person
HIGH SCHOOL DRIVE-BY TRUMPS WORLD POLITICS
by Doug Lasken

LOS ANGELES -- Tip O'Neill famously said that all politics is local. This idea might seem strange to people contemplating the Bush administration's war policies. What does our Iraqi policy have to do with potholes and variances? [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
DID VENEZUELA SHOOT DOWN U.S. SPY PLANE?
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Sept. 23, 2003 -- An American OV-10 spy plane that was reportedly shot down Sunday over northeast Colombia, killing the pilot, may have been deliberately attacked by Venezuelan authorities, The American Reporter has learned. Some 22,700 Venezuelan soldiers are deployed to guard that nation's long border with Colombia - which rebels cross, some say, with Venezuelan government approval. [MORE]

Ink Soup
WHO WAS PUSHKIN?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--It is almost a tradition that the dons of Oxford and Cambridge should dabble in mystery and detective novels on the side. Being the world's greatest expert on the Pre-Socratics, say, or the arthropoda of the Antipodes, is all very well, but it is also nice to have written something that one's children are not ashamed of. And can live on. [MORE]

Opinion
IT'S TIME FOR A NEW U.S.-IRAN AGENDA
by Ali Mashayekhi Kirk

ORLANDO, Fla. -- The year was 1979, I was 13 and living in Washington, D.C. My father was a foreign news correspondent for the Iranian state-owned television and radio station, known as NIRT. It was a year that I and many others would not forget. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
SCATOLOGY 101: NOW THEY'RE CURSING IN KINDERGARTEN
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Now, I assure you, he didn't hear these words at home; not, at least, in the context he was using them. He was angry, this little tyke in short pants and a striped shirt, standing with his feet planted firmly, his little tears dropping from his cheeks into the playground dust. Another kid had climbed up the ladder close behind him and pushed him down the slide before he was set to go. [MORE]

Market Mover
WALL STREET-INSPIRED THOUGHTS ON GRASSO, GOLF, AND GREED
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, FLA. (Sept. 22, 2003)-Since the (Dick) Grasso is always greener on the other side of Wall Street, I am now required to enumerate some disjointed thoughts on folks who "just don't get it." [MORE]

On Native Ground
HEALTH CARE COSTS, NOT AL-QAEDA, WORRY AMERICANS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What is considered a bigger worry to the average American - another 9/11-style terrorist attack or not having health insurance? [MORE]

ON Media
RECALL RADIO MISFIRES
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- The news flash last Monday that a federal court had ordered the California recall election postponed promised a rare afternoon of talk radio. In these parts, the recall is talk radio's holy crusade. [MORE]

Monday Moron
THE CAMPAIGN ROAD TO NOWHERE
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla, -- Is it in you? [MORE]

Jill Stewart
IN RECALL CHAOS, WHO'S WORSE: THE JUDGES, OR THE PRESS?
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Sept. 18, 2003 -- If the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals delays the recall, pity the voters who will be subjected to months of Gray Davis faking he likes church (as when he loudly pronounced Psalms as "Palm" while praying with Bill Clinton) and faking he's a good man. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE GET-RICH CON: ARE MEDIA VALUES BETTER NOW?
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Presidential candidates have become fond of asking whether Americans are better off now than they were four years ago. Looking back at a sensational Time magazine story that appeared in late September 1999, we might want to ask a similar question: "Are media values better than they were four years ago?" [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
50 MAOISTS SLAIN IN DAYLONG CLASH IN NEPAL
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Sept. 17, 2003 -- Nepalese security forces Wednesday killed more than 50 Maoists in the Bhabang area of Rolpa district, the stronghold of Communist rebels in western Nepal, in the bloodiest clash since the breakdown of a ceasefire and peace talks three weeks ago. [MORE]

Momentum
WHEN THE LAW OF THE JUNGLE PREVAILS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's hard to be a Jew today, even an American Jew, when the headlines are screaming, "Israeli official: Killing Arafat is a possibility." [MORE]

Make My Day
DO THEY HAVE AIR ROADIES?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Ask any musician what the greatest musical instrument is, and you could easily start a riot. Some believe it's the piano, others say it's the guitar, and a few brave souls would answer the bagpipes. But while opinions vary wildly, everyone would at least agree that it's not the accordion. [MORE]

Brasch Words
HURRICANE ISABEL MAY STRAIN WARTIME BUDGETS
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- America has already spent more than $80 billion in the past year on its "war on terrorism," and the president has asked Congress for $87 billion more to rebuild Iraq. But the cost of the war - in the form of depleted Guard units, Red Cross resources, and money for social services for Hurricane Isabel - could force Americans to come face to face with the drain on U.S. resources the war has caused. [MORE]

Reporting: Washington
F.A.A. IS SUED OVER 9/11 DEATHS
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON -- The FAA has been notified that it will be sued by some survivors and relatives of victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on New York City's financial district and the Pentagon, the American Reporter has learned. [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
AS POLITICAL CRISIS DEEPENS, U.S. MOVES TO HELP NEPAL
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, Sept. 18, 2003 -- The United States government has expressed its willingness to help Nepal defeat Maoist rebels here amid a political crisis that has deepened with the breakdown of peace talks and a ceasefire with the Maoists and a widening rift between the political parties and the king. [MORE]

Monday Moron
YOU'RE NOT JOHN STAMOS - OR EVEN RAY ROMANO
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla. -- The media has been going ballistic on our self-image for years - and, it appears, the damage is finally starting to become evident. An evening of television, a glance at a billboard or a trip to the theater will easily bring this assault into clear view for any American harboring (notice my use of terrorist-era lingo) an IQ approaching three digits. [MORE]

On Media
LOOKING BACK ONE CENTURY
by Robert Gelfand

It is a fascinating yet strangely unsettling experience to watch the Mitchell & Kenyon films. We sit in a darkened theater, seeing the living, breathing people of the year 1903, as factory workers - adults and children alike - walk out from the gates of the factories where they work. Or we see them walking through the local fairgrounds, or watching a parade. We view their faces, observe their clothing, guess their ages, and see ourselves one step removed. [MORE]

Reporting: California Recall
U.S. PANEL BARS CALIFIFORNIA RECALL - MAYBE
by Ron Kenner

HOLLYWOOD, Calif., Sept. 15, 2003 -- This state is home to Hollywood, after all. And so, shortly after 10 a.m. today, in the last of a dozen legal challenges to the voter-mandated gubernatorial recall election that has captivated the nation, a federal appeals court in San Francisco came to the rescue of lagging Governor Gray Davis, who only days ago seemed to be facing near-certain defeat in the only serious recall effort mounted in nine decades. For Davis, it was like being the damsel in distress tied to the tracks in front of a fast-moving freight train driven by "Terminator" star Arnold Schwarzenegger and Davis's own mustachioed villain, Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante. [MORE]

Bulletin
SENATE SINKS MEDIA CROSS-OWNERSHIP RULES, 55-40
American Reporter Staff

WASHINGTON, D.C., Sept. 16, 2003, 11:37am EST -- By a wide margin, the United States Senate this morning used a new and rarely-used parliamentary device called a Resolution of Disapproval to kill implementation of so-called cross-ownership rules that would have allowed media conglomerates to own more than one tv station and newspaper in the same market. The ruling was a stinging and ignominious defeat for FCC Chairman Michael K. Powell, who had proposed the rules in the face of broad public opposition that ran 99 to 1 against his proposal. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CARB AND A CARBURETOR?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. - Where was I when the distinction between fats, proteins, carbohydrates, nutrients, calories, cholesterol - good and bad - was taught? There are simple and complex carbohydrates. I'm in the dark. The shopping cart is filled with what we need for the week and yet John eyes each package and smirks before he says "Do you know how many trans fats are in this?"20 [MORE]

USE PAYS A PRICE FOR IGNORANCE OF HISTORY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Harry S Truman, one of America's greatest presidents, never stopped being a student of history. [MORE]

Media Beat
TRIUMPH OF THE MEDIA MILL
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Without a hint of intended irony, the "NewsHour" on PBS concluded its Sept. 9 program with a warm interview of Henry Kissinger and then a segment about a renowned propagandist for the Nazi war machine. Kissinger talked about his latest book. Then a professor of German history talked about Leni Riefenstahl, the path-breaking documentary filmmaker who just died at age 101. [MORE]

Market Mover
'WORLD WAR III IS HERE,' SAYS FORMER POW
by Mark Scheinbaum

COVINGTON, Ky., Sept. 11, 2003 -- Retired U.S. Navt Capt. Jerry Coffee, who spent more than seven years in a North Vietnamese POW prison cell, told a group of investment executives today that "World War III has already begun, and we have to have faith in ourselves to get through it." [MORE]

Make My Day
GO BUG SOMEONE ELSE
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Ask any granola-munching, Birkenstock-wearing tree hugger, and they'll tell you the same thing: insects are the very foundation that the entire food chain is built on. If you wipe out the insects, all life on Earth will soon vanish. [MORE]

The American Reporter Joins All Americans
In Mourning the Victims of
September 11, 2001

American Essay
THE LESSONS OF SEPTEMBER 11

by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Sept. 11, 2003 -- I am terribly conflicted about what America ought to do or think or say about the events of Sept. 11. There are days when I would like us to distance ourselves from the Israeli-Palestinian/Judeo-Islamic conflict and let these two old enemies solve their own problems in whatever way their Old Testament "eye for an eye" creeds will permit. [MORE]

Reporting: Washington
FAMILY OF MISSING 727 PILOT CAN'T GET ANSWERS
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON, Sept. 11, 2003 -- A Boeing 727 that disappeared from an Angolan airport on May 25, 2003 is still unaccounted for, and the brother of its missing flight engineer has told The American Reporter he has grown frustrated by a lack of response from the Bush administration. [MORE]

Momentum
A NATIONAL DAY OF MOURNING
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- About a month ago, when I was making a appointment with my dentist, the secretary said, "How's Sept. 11 for you?" It startled me. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SAUNA SUTRA
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--Readers may be excused for thinking that I spend most of my life in the sauna. Not so. The better part, perhaps, but not most of my life. [MORE]

On Media
IN AD DOLLAR SHOOTOUT, IT'S PRESS AGAINST PLASTIC
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif -- "San Pedro Magazine" is the name of an advertising supplement published by the Press-Telegram, a newspaper published in San Pedro's neighboring city of Long Beach. "More San Pedro" is the name of a different, soon-to-be-published, advertising supplement, the brainchild of another local newspaper, the Daily Breeze, published in another neighboring city, Torrance. Each publication is an example of what has evidently come to be the latest rage in the newspaper world, the monthly advertiser. [MORE]

Hominy & Hawsh
WHOSE MOMENT IS THIS, ANYWAY?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When 80 years pass between her writing a line and my reading it, all the impact of that moment in her life is diminished in this moment of mine. For instance, in 1927, she wrote in bold block letters: I HAVE BOBBED MY HAIR !!! Every other line in the book and those in all succeeding years is written in her smoothly-penned Palmer Method of penmanship where an occasional splatter of ink spots betrays her haste. [MORE]

An A.R. Essay
THE POLITICAL CAPITAL OF 9/11
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The Bush administration never hesitated to exploit the general public's anxieties that arose after the traumatic events of September 11, 2001. [MORE]

Monday Moron
DOUBLE YOUR DISPLEASURE
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla. -- We live in a country based upon the great double-standard. (More on that in future years.) We also live in a society which has very little attachment to reality. Our entire existence is like a rolling movie plot. [MORE]

An A.R. Editorial
NOW IT'S A ROAD MAP TO NOWHERE
by Joe Shea

The resignation of Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas is yet another powerful indictment of the "tilt" in U.S. policy in the Middle East that has undermined every effort by Americans to bring peace to the region. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE SCHEMERS WHO TURNED 9/11 INTO A FOREIGN POLICY DISASTER
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We're two years removed from that tragic September morning of death and destruction in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania. [MORE]

Market Mover
'PRESIDENT BILL RICHARDSON' HAS A NICE RING TO IT
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Sept. 5, 2003 -- The Democratic Party could nominate New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, and go on to beat President George Bush the next time around, but that will never happen. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
RECALL DEBATE SLEIGHT-OF-HAND: DID YOU MISS THIS?
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Wednesday's recall debate broke little new ground as meek journalists and inexperienced citizens lobbed softballs at Gov. Gray Davis and the candidates, failed to ask the toughest questions and let false statements go unchallenged. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE QUAGMIRE OF DENOUNCING A 'QUAGMIRE'
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- When I hear pundits warn that Iraq is becoming a "quagmire," I wince. [MORE]

Make My Day
DON'T FORGET THE RECLINER
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- The biggest complaint most married Guys have is that we don't have our privacy. Just like anyone else, we need to have a space we can call our own. A place that gives us complete and utter privacy - refuge from the outside world, our Fortress of Solitude, our Sanctum Sanctorum (from the Latin, meaning "Speak English like the rest of us!"). [MORE]

Momentum
AS DEAN SURGES AHEAD
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It was curiosity that made me drive through that millionaire's wonderland of winding dirt roads, spectacular views, large houses, manicured lawns, horses and swimming pools this past Saturday morning to hear Dr. Howard Dean, the former governor of Vermont and the current front-running Democratic presidential candidate, talk in Walpole, N.H. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE EDUCATION OF DR. SOUP
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The point of Dr. Soup's first lecture in any course was to cut the audience of 200 down to the size of a seminar for the remainder of the semester. Here is a transcript of a typical opening: [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
NINE-ELEVEN, DEJA VU
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- "Just want to say, I love you," words left on = an answering machine in tones suggesting he had work to do - helping others. They say "pride goes before a fall" but not that day. Line after line of transcribed voices suggest a pride in doing what has to be done in their present moment. There was no evidence of whimpering, simpering, or "poor me." [MORE]

Happy Labor Day, America!

On Native Ground
IT'S TIME TO SEEK THE U.N.'S HELP IN IRAQ

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Watching the Bush administration try to find a way out of the mess it created in Iraq reminds me of something former House Speaker Sam Rayburn once said: "A jackass can kick a barn down, but it takes a carpenter to build one." [MORE]

Reporting: 9/11
FAA 'RED TEAM' FAULTS SECURITY AT U.S. AIRPORTS
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON -- The four officials chiefly responsible for aviation security at the airports where planes were hijacked on Sept. 11, 2001, are still in important and very public positions in aviation security, The American Reporter has learned, despite substantive questions about their role in that day's historic disasters. [MORE]

Monday Moron
KEEP THE TOASTER OUT OF THE TUB
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- Am I the only one who feels like a kernel inside a microwave popcorn bag every time I stroll into the garage? [MORE]

On Media
AT CINECON 2003, A WINDOW ON THE PAST
by Robert Gelfand

HOLLYWOOD, Calif -- The early history of motion pictures may help us understand the modern mass media, as I learned in Hollywood over Labor Day weekend, when several hundred film scholars, historians and enthusiasts were gathered at the historic Egyptian Theater here for 39th annual Cinecon film festival. Run by the Society of Cinephiles, Cinecon attracts people from all over the United States and Europe who gather to watch films, compare notes on film history and illuminate its future in the light of the past. [MORE]

Make My Day
BECAUSE I'M DADDY, THAT'S WHY
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- "Alright, we're here. I want everyone to be good." [MORE]

Media Beat
ARE THE TEN COMMANDMENTS 'FAIR AND BALANCED'?
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- A national media spotlight has focused on the battle between the Constitution of the United States and some religious fundamentalists who viewed themselves as angels of Montgomery, Ala. The removal of a big Ten Commandments monument from an Alabama courthouse on Wednesday was good news for people who prefer democracy to theocracy. [MORE]

Momentum
A DAY AT THE RACES
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Despite the popularity of Laura Hillenbrand's riveting book "Seabiscuit" and the wonderful movie that was made from it, and despite the momentary fame of the New York horse Funnycide, who won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness before fading at Belmont and losing the Triple Crown, horse racing appears to be dying in this country. [MORE]

Market Mover
BEWARE OF 'IN-HOUS' MUTUAL FUNDS
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Aug. 27, 2003 -- The publicity ax has fallen on Morgan Stanley (Dean Witter) over the use of "in-house" mutual funds, but the widespread practice is not limited to that venerable firm. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SOUP FOR GOV
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- It is of course not unusual to see Dr. Soup in a state of smoldering fury, but when he stormed into the office today I knew that this was not ordinary rage. [MORE]

Opinion
WHY DEAN AND GREEN DON'T MATCH THE PROGRESSIVE AGENDA
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Let's take Howard Dean at his word: "I was a triangulator before Clinton was a triangulator. In my soul, I'm a moderate." [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
TO THE HANDS THAT ROCK THE CRADLES
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Modern couples write their own wedding vows and often include a Biblical quote. The one most often used is from the Book of Ruth: "Whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge; thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God." [MORE]

An A.R. Editorial
WHY SHOULDN'T WE KILL?
by Joe Shea

Civilization sprang from law, and while there may have been earlier ones, the 10 Commandments - known to Jews as the Ten Declarations - pre-date Islam by 2,100 years, Christianity by 1,400 years, Confucianism by 850 years, and Buddhism by 775 years. They are the first Law of modern civilization, and while there may be a degree of religious and academic controversy about which version of these laws represents which religion, those differences are not carved in stone. [MORE]

Monday Moron
SWEAT LIKE AN EGYPTIAN
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla. -- The thermometer reads a steady 93 degrees Celsius. The local meteorologist informs me the "feels like"-temperature is hot as, well, Florida in August (or a fresh cup of McDonald's coffee). The rain pounds the sand so viciously that my neighbor, Noah, begins to shop Amazon.com for a deal on "Ark Builder 2003." Buoyed by the conditions, the mosquitoes burgeon in stature, some now big enough to accommodate requests for an in-flight movie. One bite and the American Red Cross suggests a large glass of orange juice and a period of relaxation. I, myself, donate a pint or two during a suicide run for the trash cans. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
PUTRID SMELL WAFTS OVER THE CALIFORNIA RECALL
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Five styles have emerged in the governor's race, from the blame-game of Gov. Gray Davis to the compassionate fiscal conservatism of Peter Ueberroth and Arnold Schwarzenegger, to the tax 'em high anti-business jihad of Cruz Bustamante to the ultra-conservative cost slashing of Tom McClintock and Bill Simon. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE SHAMEFUL, SHABBY TREATMENT OF U.S. SOLDIERS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Just about every politician loves to wave the flag and say they support the troops. But the things we've seen so far in Iraq suggest otherwise. [MORE]

Media Beat
IF FAMOU.S. JOURNALISTS BECAME HONEST RAPPERS
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- The "Bulworth" movie - with Warren Beatty playing a senator who begins to speak disturbing truths in the form of rap lyrics - caused quite a stir when it came out five years ago. At the time, I wondered aloud in a column about what might happen if leading journalists followed that fictional example. [MORE]

Make My Day
WINE SELECTION FOR GUYS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- As a recognized Guy wine expert ("Hey look! It's a Guy wine expert") I'm often asked by other Guys about the proper way to select a wine without looking like a complete nerd. [MORE]

Momentum
WHAT'S THE BIG DEAL ABOUT GAY MARRIAGE?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Maybe I'm missing something, but when it comes to gay marriage, I don't understand the fuss. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
RECALL OPENS NEW DEBATE ON ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- I am a Radical Centrist with an urge to speak freely coursing through my veins. So I squirmed with delight when former Gov. Pete Wilson blurted out on a talk show a few days back that Arnold Schwarzenegger voted for Proposition 187 in 1994 and thinks illegal immigration is a problem for California. [MORE]

SCHWEIKART URGES U.S. TO MOVE SPACE PROGRAM BEYOND NEAR EARTH ORBIT
by Lucy Komisar

LaBAULE, France - Congressional committees are expected to hold hearings in the fall, after the release Aug. 26 of the report by an independent board investigating the Columbia spacecraft disaster, and former astronaut Rusty Schweickart has some ideas for those committees, he told a French forum last March. [MORE]

Market Mover
THE MORAL THIEVES OF BAGHDAD
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla. Parties unknown have assassinated UN Special Representative in Baghdad, Sergio Vieira de Mello to prove to the world, well, to prove to the world that anyone can "off" anyone else, at any time. [MORE]

Ink Soup
FULL MOON NOTES
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I am writing this on the night of the full moon, so you have been warned. But there is an up side to insomnia: columns written while the writer is wide, even painfully, awake, tend to be more interesting-all right, lucid--than those written while he is in his more customary somnolent mode. [MORE]

Breakthrough: Nanotechnology
U.S.ING ATOMS, ONE AT A TIME
by Komisar

LaBAULE, France - Man-made muscles that contract like biological ones but that are 100 times stronger, that are so powerful, they can inject drugs without a needle. [MORE]

IT'S LIFE AND DEATH, BUT THEY CALL IT 'PRIORITY RATIONING'
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Life is a game of chance but there are those out there who are trying to mark the cards. [MORE]

On Media
MIKE ROYKO, JOURNALISM AND BEER
by Robert Gelfand

CHICAGO -- Any place where Mike Royko drank ought to be a good place to think about journalism, so I went down to Billy Goat's Tavern Friday night and had a beer and thought about outrage and wit and the appropriate function of the news media. [MORE]

Monday Moron
OBJECTIONABLE ABSTINENCE
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla. -- Does anyone really "practice" abstinence? The word "practice" implies effort by definition. Heck, I single-handedly (sometimes with both hands) "practiced" abstinence through the early 80s and didn't even know it. I think the word we should be using here is "observe." [MORE]

Reporting: Terror
AMERICAN AND THAI POLICE ARREST HAMBALI
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, Aug. 15, 2003 - American and Thai police arrested Hambali, arguably Southeast Asia's most wanted terrorist and allegedlly the second in command of the Jemaah Islamiyah terrorist network, in Ayutthaya, a small town about 80 kilometers south of Bangkok, earlier this week. He was flown Friday to an undisclosed location, probably Bahgram AFB, an American airbase in Afghanistan where many al-Qaida prisoners are jailed, for quesioning. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WAR'S REALITES COME HOME TO A SMALL VERMONT TOWN
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The war in Iraq came home to my corner of Vermont the other day. [MORE]

Across America
WHO 'RESET' THE POWER GRID?
by Joe Shea

FORT STOCKTON, Tex. -- Shortly after 1 p.m. Mountain Time in El Paso yesterday morning I walked up to the doors of the ExxonMobil station at Exit O in Anthony, Tex., and found a sign on the door: "Electric Power Outage!" it read, but inside the air conditioning was on, machines and lights were working and employees milled around aimlessly. [MORE]

Make My Day
WHICH PART OF NO DON'T YOU UNDERSTAND?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- It's not something I like to talk about, but when I was in college I did something I'm not proud of: I was a telemarketer. [MORE]

Foreign Affairs
E.U. CLASH ON ADMITTING TURKEY WORRIES U.S.
by Lucy Komisar

LaBAULE, France -- People's eyes now are on Iraq, deemed by Bush officials a key factor in reshaping the Middle East. A few glances ought to shift toward its neighbor, Turkey, which could be as important for the future of the Muslim world. [MORE]

Momentum
AMERICA SLICED AND DICED
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Pictures from my niece's wedding arrived last week. [MORE]

Media Beat
NEWS FLASH: THIS IS NOT A 'SILLY SEASON'
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Contrary to media cliches about "the silly season," this is a time of very serious - and probably catastrophic - political maneuvers. [MORE]

Foreign Affairs
PARSING THE U.S.-EUROPEAN DIPLOMATIC CRISIS
by Lucy Komisar

LaBAULE, France -- The U.S. and Europe have never been so estranged. The widespread European hostility to U.S. policy on Iraq builds on anger provoked by the Bush administration's scuttling of numerous global accords on environment, weapons and international justice. The opposition to Washington policy exists on both citizen and high political levels. The rift between the U.S. and its European allies will damage America unless both sides act to heal it - and unless the U.S. acts to deal with the causes of European anger. [MORE]

Across America
ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER AND THE NEXT ENERGY CRISIS
by Joe Shea

TUCSON, Ariz., Aug. 12, 2003 -- Remember the phony claims of energy traders that unraveled into the Enron scandal and, as California Gov. Gray Davis said during his Los Angeles Times debate with Republican businessman Bill Simon, "We were bilked out of $21 billion..."? [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE BIBLE THAT ATE DOROTHY'S CANARY
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The agony of my fellow Christians in the Episcopal Church would be almost comical if it were not so heartrending. I'd started this column when Bishop Robinson's election was suddenly delayed by two accusations of sexual misconduct. I telephoned Dr. Soup to beat the bushes for some substitute topic on which we could hold forth until the diocesan bishops in Minneapolis had made up their minds. [MORE]

Market Mover
AMERICA'S VETERANS AGENCY: A TEXTBOOK FOR FAILURE
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Aug. 12, 2003 -- The Wall Street Journal deserves a Pulitzer Prize for today's report on the failures of the Veterans' Administration, but it won't get one. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
HATS, ON AND OFF
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- "I had a hat when I came in, I put it on the rack, and I'll have a hat when I go out or I'll break somebody's back." That little ditty was popular when hand clapping and the clicking of heels dancing a jig across wooden barroom floors was the only accompaniment and, by golly, it spoke the truth. Drunk or sober, gentlemen removed their hats indoors and put them where they knew they would stay until they left. [MORE]

Brasch Words
MEGA-MOUTH, SQUAWKERS AND THE NEW 'HOLLYWEIRD'
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. - The talk show squawkers call them the "Hollyweirds." Makes no difference if they're writers, actors, directors, producers, or grips and gaffers. Makes no difference if they're poets, artists, sculptors, dancers, cartoonists, musicians, or singers. And, it makes absolutely no difference if they live in Southern California or Iowa. As long as they're in the creative arts, they're "Hollyweird." [MORE]

On Media
THERE ARE NO USD CARS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- There are no used cars for sale where I live. They are now called "pre-owned." At least that is how they are advertised in the newspapers and on those post-midnight car commercials which are occasionally interrupted by a movie. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
ARNOLD'S FIRST CHALLENGE: SACRAMENTO'S LOCO REPUBLICANS
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- No matter who is running against Gov. Gray Davis, the California gubernatorial race promises to shine a spotlight on Sacramento's elected Republicans and the views that have turned them into an isolated minority - just when the Republican Party has an unexpected chance to win a governorship. [MORE]

On Native Ground
SOME ADVICE TO THE DLC: WHO DARES, WINS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The buzz for former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean is getting louder. [MORE]

Make My Day
YEAH? WELL, I DOUBLE DARE YOU!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I don't know what it is with teenagers these days. [MORE]

California Recall
SCHWARZENEGGER, BU.S.TAMANTE SHAPE FATEFUL GOVERNOR'S RACE
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- Movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger and California's Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante - the lone statewide official to back Hollywood's secession last year - announced Wednesday that they both will join the race for the seat at the head of the Golden State's table now held by Gov. Gray Davis, the first statewide elected official to be the object of a recall in this century. Of course, the century's just begun - and so has this race. [MORE]

Essay
WHY NOT A VESTAL VIRGIN FOR CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR?
by Ron Kenner

HOLLYWOOD -- Why not a vestal virgin? And if she doesn't do a good job as governor, we can always dump her into a volcano and hope for the best next time. Don't laugh. This is California! [MORE]

Momentum

EVERYBODY'S GOT A HUNGRY HEART

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- At first it was, "Oh no, Bruce, no." This is no way to hear your music. [MORE]

Ink Soup
G.M.FORD IS NO LEMON - BUT NO JOKE?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- Bedtime reading ought not to be so intellectually stimulating or demanding that it prevents sleep. On the other hand, it should not be so uninvolving that it invites sleep before you are half-way through chapter one. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
DEFINING A DISTANT GENERATION
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Finding an precise definition of "generation" is a formidable task. My preconceived notion was that I am of the same generation as all the children of my parents, the children of their siblings (my first cousins) and the growing families around the globe contemporary to my parents. [MORE]

Monday Moron
DISSOLVE YOUR RESOLVE
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla. -- Take stock America - literally! We're just past the halfway point of the year - the end of quarter two of fiscal year 2003 if you will - and the markets seem to be on the mend. At this time, just as most business entities evaluate their progress in relation to yearly goals, so do we as people take "stock" of our own achievements toward the fulfillment of our New Year's resolutions. [MORE]

On Media
RUDENESS RULES THE RADIO
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Thursday's John and Ken radio talk show (KFI AM 640) included an interview with Rep Loretta Sanchez (D-Calif.) in which the hosts interrupted Sanchez over 30 times, yelled loudly into their microphones in order to drown out her voice, and at several points screamed at her, "Are you ignorant or are you lying?" What is of interest is that the hosts were so proud of their performance that they ran the tape again later in the same show. [MORE]

Under Fire
A SILENT KILLER STALKS U.S. TROOPS IN IRAQ
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Aug. 1, 2003, 10.00am EST -- A mystery illness that bears some similarities to chemical and radiation poisoning has killed at least two U.S. soldiers In Iraq since June 17 and sickened another 11, said worried Army officials who this week took the unusual step of dispatching two elite epidemiological teams to investigate. [MORE]

On Native Ground
USE ADMINISTRATION PASSING THE BUCK ON 9/11
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Americans have been waiting a long time to find out the truth about the events leading up to the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE GANG THAT COULDN'T TALK STRAIGHT
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- We're living in an era when news coverage often involves plenty of absurdity. [MORE]

Make My Day
MAYBE I SHOULD DIG A MOAT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- My neighbor is stealing my lawn. [MORE]

Momentum
FOLK MUSIC AWAKENS TO ITS RADICAL ROOTS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Old folkies never die, they just go to Falcon Ridge. And this year Holly Near was there to awaken them from a long, long sleep. [MORE]

Editorial
RIORDAN SHOULD RUN
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., July 30, 2003 -- There is nothing inherently wise or beneficial in taking the governorship away from one money-hoarding politician and giving it to a well-off millionaire. But there is a benefit for all Californians in taking away the governor's mansion from Gray Davis and putting it in the hands of Richard Riordan. [MORE]

Market Mover
THE SAFE BOND MYTH DIES HARD
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., July 30, 2003 -- Just before the Fourth of July weekend, most Americans with good credit could secure a 30-year fixed mortgage for about 5.31 percent. Less than a month later, in most cities, the same mortgage might cost 6.25 percent. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
BOB HOPE: AND HE LIVED HAPPILY EVER AFTER
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Because there is so much being said about Bob Hope, I wasn't going to add my thoughts, at least until I got an email sent to the family "loop" from our son, Tom. [MORE]

"Thanks For the Memories!"
Bob Hope
1903 - 2003

Passings
AMERICA'S COMEDIAN, BOB HOPE, IS DEAD AT 100

by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., July 28, 2003 -- Bob Hope, whose century of life was a long string of wisecracks and a longer string of friends high and low, passed away last night in Toluca Lake, Calif., his legacy of gales of laughter and good memories likely to linger a century more. [MORE]

Reporting: The West in Flames
A FOREST FIRE'S LESSONS
by Mark Scheinbaum

TAOS PUEBLO, N.M., July 28, 2003 -- The competing interests of lumber, tourism, public safety, and Native American traditions all challenged firefighters this week in and around New Mexico's northernmost autonomous pueblo. [MORE]

Monday Moron
REALITY BITES
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- Dammit, Scott! [MORE]

On Native Ground
EVEN USE CAN HEAR 'GIANT SUCKING SOUND' OF LOST JOBS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The recession is over. [MORE]

Media Beat
GREEN PARTY TO TAKE THE PLUNGE IN 2004
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- For the 2004 presidential race, the Green dye is cast. [MORE]

Make My Day
MY LENS IS BIGGER THAN YOURS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I've always enjoyed photography, although I haven't always had the necessary equipment. When I took a photojournalism class in college, I fancied myself a younger, less depressing Ansel Adams, and that I was just two-hundredths of a second away from shooting dramatic news photos for the Associated Press in foreign locales. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
IT'S DOPES V. BUFFOONS IN CALIFORNIA RECALL
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- What the media observes firsthand during political wars, but often "cleans up" when it reports the news for public consumption, continually bemuses me. I saw this behavior as journalists covered the dopes trying to recall Gray Davis and the buffoons trying to keep Davis in office. [MORE]

DAVIS RECALL PETITIONS WIN NEW ELECTION
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., July 23, 2003 -- Democratic political honchos were laughing just months ago when asked whether the quixotic campaign to recall California's two-term Gov. Gray Davis had any chance of succeeding; like children, they often laugh when they are afraid. Today, California Democrats are very, very afraid; the state's voters may well elect a Republican governor in a recall election that is set for Oct. 7. [MORE]

Momentum
THE IMPORTANCE OF KATHARINE HEPBURN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- How do we chose our icons? And how well? [MORE]

Breaking News
NEW YORK COUNCILMAN SHOT IN CITY HALL
American Reporter Staff

BRADENTON, Fla., 3:25pm -- At least two persons including City Councilman James Davis were shot in a fusillade of bullets that riddled the New York City Council chambers at its ornate City Hall on Lower Broadway shortly after 2pm EST. [MORE]

Ink Soup
BETTER THAN THAT OF NOTHING
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Dave Niehaus, the long-time radio and tv voice of the Seattle Mariners, is one of the pleasures of seeing or hearing a ball game out here. He is as beloved a feature of the whole experience as was the Scooter for Yankees fans. His "My oh my!" is the local equivalent of "Holy cow!" "Good-bye, baseball!" is the way Dave bids farewell to a ball headed for the upper deck. A grand slam deserves a bit more drama, and he is not above slathering it on: "Get out the mustard and ryebread, Grandmaw, it's time for a grand salami!!!" [MORE]

Breaking News
FIRE DAMAGES TOP FLOOR OF EIFFEL TOWER
American Reporter Staff

BRADENTON, Fla. -- The famed Eiffel Tower in the heart of Paris has a plume of smoke billowing from its top floor, CNN reported. The world-famous Tour d'Argent, universally acclaimed as one of the best in the world, is located on the same floor where the fire appears to have started in a technical room's electrical panel and caused no injuries, according to CNN. [MORE]

Breaking News
TWO SONS OF SADDAM KILLED IN MOSUL
American Reporter Staff

BRADE4NTON, Fla., 12:25am, July 22, 2003 -- NBC News is reporting that Saddam Hussein's relatives or sons may have been killed in a confrontation with U.S. forces in the northern city of Mosul this morning. Reuters reported the two men and one of their sons, a 14-year-old, may have been among those hiding out in a large villa in the city. [Later, Lt. Gen. Ricardo S. Sanchez told reporters that both Uday and Qusay had been killed in the raid.] [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
HERE'S TO 'THE LADIES WHO LUNCH'
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- There are times just a word, a song, a scene bring the past back into focus for a fleeting moment. [MORE]

On Media
TALK RADIO CROSSES THE LINE
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- While we stodgy intellectual types busy ourselves worrying about whether the New York Times has misplaced a semicolon, talk radio is joyfully poisoning the wells of public discourse. It's not that talk radio is a little sloppy in its journalistic practice, it's that talk radio has tossed the entire concept of journalistic integrity out the window. Take the L.A.-based John & Ken Show, for example. [MORE]

LIES ABOUT GULF WAR II ARE COMING HOME TO ROOST
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It is truly sad to see how many American soldiers are dying each week in Iraq. It is even sadder knowing that these young people are dying for a bunch of lies. [MORE]

Reporting: California
TOP DEMOCRATS JOIN FIGHT AGAINST DAVIS RECALL
by Ron Kenner

LOS ANGELES, July 17, 2003 -- With the stage set to shift the political focus this time from Florida to California - and fireworks with immense implications for the next presidential campaign ready to explode - top Democrats came out swinging yesterday in a major push to help California's Governor Gray Davis in survive a multimillion dollar recall election that seems all but certain to qualify for the ballot. [MORE]

Brasch Word
THE PRETEND CAPTAIN
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- Former Texas Air National Guard Lt. George W. Bush showed up on the U.S.S. Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States. He was trim, the result of long daily workouts, and jauntily dressed in a fighter pilot's flight suit. To sailors returning from Gulf War II he gave a speech written by taxpayer-funded speech writers. He looked just like a Navy flyer, maybe even a commander-in-chief; he said what a president should say - and recorded for broadcast around the world. [MORE]

Momentum
JOHN ASHCROFT, GET OUT OF MY UNDERWEAR!
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- While preparing to make a mold of my teeth the other day, the dentist made a little joke. [MORE]

Media Beat
IMPREACHING N.P.R.: MARA LIASSON'S DOUBLE STANDARD
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The superstar columnist George Will has an impressive vocabulary. Too bad it doesn't include the words "I'm sorry." [MORE]

Ink Soup
HAVE YOU AUTOGOOGLED?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- There are times when I wish that I had a less ordinary name, one shared with fewer people, something along the lines of those splendid members of Cromwell's parliament, the Barebones brothers. One was named Paisegod Barebones and the other, probably the younger, If Christ Had Not Died Thou Hadst Been Damned Barebones. The latter is said to have been known in the family as Damned. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
UP TO MY HIPS IN DALEY-GATORS*
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- I was once the old lady who lived in a shoe with plenty of room for kids and enough space left over for assorted dogs, cats, rabbits, turtles, tropical fish, a gecko and a bird. [MORE]

Analysis
OIL INTERESTS MAY FIGURE IN SAO TOME COUP
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., July 16, 2003 -- The tiny nation of Sao Tome and Principe - the smallest, poorest and most peaceful democracy in Africa - fell victim to a sudden military coup in the hours before dawn Wednesday, and there is little doubt that oil politics are the cause. San Tome's President Fradique de Menezes was in Nigeria on a "private visit" when the coup took place, according to Nigerian officials who strongly condemned the coup. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
DAVIS GATHERS CASH HOARD TO FIGHT RECALL
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- As the effort to recall California Gov. Gray Davis moves into overdrive and the noxious consultant Chris Lehane - who helped President Bill Clinton formulate his creepy Monica Lewinsky strategy - prepares to launch an assault on the truth unlike anything we've witnessed in a California election, a phrase keeps circling inside my head. Follow the money. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WAIST-DEEP IN IRAQ MESS, USE PRESSES ON
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's tough to definitively designate the single stupidest statement ever uttered by President Bush, but his recent ill-advised challenge to the Iraqis who have been attacking U.S. forces - "Bring them on!" - would certainly be near the top of the list. [MORE]

Reporting: Washington
9/11 COMMISSION WARNS OF DoD DELAYS; PANEL TOLD ARAB CULTURE CLASH SPURRED ATTACKS
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON - The third public hearing of the independent National Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United States - better known as the the 9/11 Commission - focused on geopolitics and on distant causes of the attacks, while its two top officials warned that the Defense Department's foot-dragging on the production of related documents could endanger the quality of its final report. [MORE]

Make My Day
AT LEAST IT WASN'T A TANK
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- You've got to love the Scottish people. Not only do the men wear kilts without embarrassment (and threaten to beat the haggis out of anyone who laughs at them), but the Scottish national instrument - the bagpipes - were originally used in wartime to frighten opposing soldiers. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
INDONESIAN JOURNALISM: FROM LIBERATION TO DEFAMATION
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, Indonesia, July 10, 2003 -- It began in June last year when Kompas, Indonesia's largest daily newspaper, published a report about former president Abdurrahman Wahid's intention to remove a young politician from his key party post. Kompas quoted "a source" as saying that Cholil Bisri, a senior member of the party, had objected to Wahid's proposal and threatened to resign if secretary-general Saifullah Yusuf was removed. Wahid reportedly said that Yusuf was involved in "money politics" -a practice of vote buying among Indonesian politicians. [MORE]

Momentum
A TRIBUTE TO THE LATE GREAT KATE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- How do I love you, Katharine Hepburn? Let me count the ways. [MORE]

Reporting: Washington
9/11 COMMISSION TELLS OF 'DRAMATIC' FINDINGS, MANY DIFFICULTIES
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON, July 8 -- The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States has released its first interim teport, saying that the Commission's first six months have produced great progress and will shed "dramatic new light" on America's worst terrorist attacks, but has much more work ahead. [MORE]

Media Beat
SUMMERTIME ... AND THE MONEY IS EASY
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- While President Bush's re-election campaign accumulates an unprecedented pile of dollars, the country's news media are deep in a rut of reporting about the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. With the next national Election Day scarcely 15 months away, most signs point to a new triumph for the politics of money. [MORE]

Ink Soup
CATCH ME IF YOU CAN
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- "Have a nice day! Have a nice day!" Hearing this incessant wish from people who could not care less what sort of day you're about to have can spoil the day for those who might otherwise have actually had a nice one. My friend Paul Fussell, the famous curmudgeon, and author of best-selling books about literature, war, and uniforms, had an answer to this: [MORE]

On Media
EXPONENTIALLY WRONG
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- My savings account is growing exponentially, but also very slowly. The Internet is probably not growing exponentially. These statements are arguably true but would likely be challenged by a large number of mathematically-challenged writers and editors who increasingly misuse an important term. [MORE]

AN AR Editorial
SEN. CARL LEVIN 'BOWELS' 'EM OVER
by Joe Shea

As of July 9, 2003, U.S. Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) is chairing a U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee investigation - and a cover-up, we suspect - of the origins of the lie about Iraq's search for uranium that was contained in the live, televised State of the Union speech President George W. Bush gave to a joint session of Congress in late January. The White House admitted on July 7 that the information used by the President to gain support for the war against Iraq was not credible and should not have been used because it was based on forged documents. That admission only comes after we learned the lie was debunked by the intelligence community and by a U.S. Ambassador at least five months before the President's speech. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THANKS TO THE NET, HOWARD DEAN HITS THE BIG TIME
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- They aren't laughing anymore. [MORE]

Reporting: Bulgaria
AMID HIS MAGNIFICENT MUSIC, A TERRIBLE ISOLATION
by Lionel Rolfe

SOFIA, BULGARIA -- Angel Stankov, Bulgaria¹s preeminent violinist and conductor, knows that his country has a terrible reputation. It's partly a reputation earned by benign neglect. People just don¹t know much about this nation of under 7.6 million people. [MORE]

Make My Day
SHE'S SUING OVER THE JELLO, TOO
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- We all make choices in life. And if our parents raised us right, we learn to accept the circumstances that result from our choices. [MORE]

Media Beat
TV AND THE VISUAL WORLD
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Media critics often say that visual images trump words. The claim makes some sense: Pictures have major impacts on how we see the world. And we're apt to pay less attention to photo captions or the voice-overs that accompany news footage on tv screens. [MORE]

Market Mover
A BET ON PANAMA AS 'HUB' OF AMERICAS
by Mark Scheinbaum

PANAMA CITY, Panama -- Panama and its famed canal might make the perfect home for a "capital" of the Americas, but it looks as if both Central and South America will lose out to "North" America. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WRITER'S BLOCK AND HOW TO BREAK IT
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Writer's block, so-called when writers begin articles and nothing comes. Nothing. There you are with fingers poised over the keyboard or pen in hand, creative juices are not flowing and the brian triggers nothing to Spring into an idea ... followed by 900 words constituting an article. [MORE]

Opinion: Indonesia
THE OLD AND THE NEW NATIONALISM: JAKARTA AND ACEH
by Andreas Harsono

BANDA ACEH, Indonesia -- I left Jakarta for Banda Aceh earlier this month with a big question in my mind: When does one expression of nationalism become old, probably senile and irrelevant - wand when is a new one strong, vigorous and relevant? [MORE]

On Media
YOU, TOO, CAN WRITE A CONSERVATIVE OPINION COLUMN
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, cALIF. -- Anyone can write a conservative newspaper column. To borrow from the Wizard of Oz, lots of people with no more talent or brains than you or me do it. Just think of Jack Kemp, Mona Charen, Larry Elder, and Thomas Sowell, whose syndicated columns appear in our nation's daily newspapers. The tricks they use are remarkably similar. [MORE]

On Native Ground
EXPLANATIONS FOR ASCHROFT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Attorney General John Ashcroft believes the press needs to do a better job explaining the U.S.A Patriot Act to the American people. [MORE]

Media Beat
BIG MONEY TOUTS DEMOCRATS IN 2004 RACE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The corporate Democrats who greased Bill Clinton's path to the White House are now a bit worried. Their influence on the party's presidential nomination process has slipped. But the Democratic Leadership Council can count on plenty of assistance from mainstream news media. [MORE]

Make My Day
MY LAWYER SAYS I'M THE BEST
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- There's a word in German, "Schadenfreude" (shodden-froid-uh) which means "finding pleasure in other people's misery." [MORE]

Momentum
THE HUMAN SIDE OF ECONOMICS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Writing about socially responsible businesses last week made me wonder what has gone wrong with our economic system in the first place. Shouldn't all businesses be socially responsible? Aren't we all living on the same planet? Aren't we all interconnected? Isn't it true that no man is an island? [MORE]

SECURITY BREACHES ALLOWED AT NUCLEAR SITES, HOUSE COMMITTEE TOLD
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON, June 24, 2003 -- A series of witnesses testified to Congress today that the Bush administration has not repaired numerous security breaches at nuclear weapons facilities in the United States even after it warned that such breaches made the nation vulnerable to a terrorist attack. [MORE]

Ink Soup
FOR WHOM THE CELL TOLLS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I can't help it. I've written about cell phones before, but it seems to me that the ubiquity of this device is bound to affect our perception of language itself. [MORE]

Brasch Words
JOINING THE SEPARATED POWERS
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- The Supreme Court received advice from a self-proclaimed constitutional scholar, civil rights analyst, and national educator recently. Yes, that was President George W. Bush. [MORE]

Market Mover
WAKE UP, AMERICA! YOUR KIDS ARE READING!
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., June 25, 2003 -- Harry Potter, boy wizard extraordinaire, please meet NBA star-turned-motivational speaker-actor John Salley. For that matter, meet Dennis Rodman and Michael Jordan. [MORE]

Native Ground
IN A NATION OF LAWS, USE MUST BE IMPEACHED
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt., June 24, 2003 - "It's not about the sex, it's about the lying." [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
NOT A MINUTE TO WASTE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- We can "use" time, find time, save time, spend time, put in time and kill time - but, we can't waste time. There just isn't enough of it. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
ACEHNESE LIVE IN GRIM SHADOWS OF CIVIL WAR
by Andreas Harsono

BANDA ACEH, Indonesia, June 19, 2003 -- It was probably a regular exchange but the clatter of American M-16s mixed with the return fire of Russian-made AK-101 automatic rifles was enough to create a terrible fear in a small village here. [MORE]

MarketMover
STOCKS? BONDS? WHERE NOW?
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., June 21, 2003 -- For someone who never owned a share of stock until February of this year, after a sojourn on Mars, or an outer galaxy, the past four months have been fantastic. [MORE]

On Native Ground
A WAR BUILT ON LIES
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Those of us who opposed Gulf War II knew that history would eventually prove us right. What we didn't expect is that it would happen so soon. [MORE]

Media Beat
WHY BRITAIN INHABITS A NOT-QUITE-PARALLEL MEDIA UNIVERSE
by Norman Solomon

LONDON -- The people of Britain and the United States are living in parallel, yet substantively different, media universes. Bonds of language and overlaps of mass culture are obvious. But a visit to London quickly illuminates the reality that mainstream journalism is much less narrow here than in America. [MORE]

Make My Day
SNAKES HAVE FEELINGS TOO, YOU KNOW!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Scientists call them herpetologists. I call them weirdos. [MORE]

Momentum
SOME GOOD NEWS ABOUT CAPITALISM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Even if we don't remember Donald J. Carty's name, most of us remember his story. [MORE]

Ink Soup
TALKING TOWER: THE LAST HUMAN DISTINCTION
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE. Wash.--In the Book of Genesis the nine brisk little verses that open the 11th chapter are hardly more than a brief respite from the exhaustive and boring inventory of the descendants of Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
CHAMPAGNE TASTE, BEER POCKETBOOK
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Just as the fairy godmother in "Sleeping Beauty" wished wonders for the newborn princess (overruling the deadly plans of some wicked witches), so also did I have a godmother who wrote her wishes for me in my 8th grade autograph book: "Chicken when you're hungry, champagne when you're dry, a nice young man at 17 and Heaven when you die." [MORE]

THE SPAMMING OF AMERICA: ANOTHER BRICK IN THE WALL
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- By now, millions of Americans are sick and tired of the spam that's flooding their in-boxes with unwanted e-mail messages - mostly offering products, services and scams that tell of big bargains, implausible windfalls, garish porno and dumb scenarios for bodily enhancements. In 2003, we're routinely slogging through large amounts of junk e-mail. [MORE]

Commentary
AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY IS BETTER THAN 'THE MATRIX'
by Doug Lasken

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- In my last article for The American Reporter, "Orwell's Vision is still alive in 2003," I suggested parallels between the management of reality in Orwell's dystopias and manipulation of information in the modern world. [MORE]

On Media
MAILERS ARE THE ULTIMATE POLITICAL CON GAME
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- In the next 12 months, you'll come to realize the importance of those three little words in the middle of the oath taken in court. Witnesses are sworn "to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth." It has become painfully clear that "the whole truth" gets left behind in political advertising. [MORE]

Market Mover
WHAT'S AT STAKE WHEN THE F.C.C. ENABLES BIG BROTHER?
by Marybeth Brennan

LAKE WORTH, Fla., June 2, 2003 -- If you want the "Big Brother" of George Orwell's "1984" to become a reality, just support the Federal Communications Commission's actions to increase media monopolies. [MORE]

Make My Day
LIAR, LIAR, PANTS ON FIRE
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I don't know exactly why it happened, but journalists are held in the same contempt as lawyers and used car salesmen. We're branded as lying muckrakers, all thanks to a few dishonest reporters who decided it would be much easier to make up their stories, rather than tell the truth. [MORE]

Editorial
LEAVING L.A.
by Joe Shea

Fare well, Los Angeles, and farewell. Along with my wife and daughter, I am leaving tomorrow after a 27 year-run that has been incredible. I don't know how you'll get along without me, but you didn't have a house or an apartment in our price range in all your 468 square miles, so we're going to Florida to live for a pittance. [MORE]

On Native Ground
ROBERT ST. JOHN: A PEACEFUL WARRIOR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- With the various scandals and misdeeds of late, journalism has fallen into a general state of disrepute. We who still believe in the power of journalism to affect social change are starving for inspiration. [MORE]

Media Beat
MANY A JEST SPOKEN AS TRUTH
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- National Public Radio deserves credit for finally airing a candid summary of how media spin works at the top of the Executive Branch. [MORE]

REPORT FROM FRANCE: 'THE WORLD IS A MESS'
by Larry Bridwell

LA BAULE, FRANCE -- "The world is a mess" was a phrase heard frequently at the Forum 21 conference held here recently. And the term likened the transAtlantic impact from the American-led war in Iraq to a "fragmentation bomb." [MORE]

Momentum
A FAILURE OF JOURNALISM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When I was working in daily journalism, I continually irritated the night editors with my frantic calls begging them to change a word in a story or make a sentence clearer. And I would often wake up in the middle of the night, panicked that I had misattributed a quote or gotten a tax figure wrong. [MORE]

Foreign Affairs
RUMSFELD QUERIED ON OFFSHORE BANKING REFORM
by Lucy Komisar

NEW YORK -- It hasn't been reported in the U.S. press – until here, now – but Milan, Italy's chief prosecutor has obtained thousands of documents that show how for more than 20 years Saddam Hussein used the Western bank and corporate secrecy system to launder bribes skimmed from oil revenues to pay his security forces and buy Western arms during international embargoes. [MORE]

SENATE G.O.P ALTERS WHITE HOUSE PLAN FOR FOREIGN AID CZAR
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON -- A bill pushed by the White House that would let President George W. Bush appoint a foreign aid czar to dole out assistance to poor countries was amended by Republicans on the the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Wednesday after senators expressed skepticism about expanding Executive Branch oversight of foreign aid to the Treasury Dept. and the Office of Management and Budget. [MORE]

On Native Ground
CONTROL THE PICTURES, CONTROL THE TRUTH
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President Bush's "war on terror" has been a war that's been long on stagecraft and short on results. The recent terror bombings in Saudi Arabia and Morocco, the continuing civil chaos in Iraq and the resurgence of the warlords in Afghanistan are just the latest examples of this. [MORE]

Media Beat
DECODING THE MEDIA FIXATION ON TERRORISM
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- By now, it's a media ritual. Whenever the U.S. government raises the alert level for terrorism - as when officials announced the orange code for "high risk" on May 20 - local, regional and national news stories assess the dangers and report on what's being done to protect us. We're kept well-informed about how worried to be at any particular time. But all that media churning includes remarkably little that has any practical utility. [MORE]

Market Mover
A SPECIAL 'K' FOR THE SELF-EMPLOYED
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla.. -- Sort of like the Kellogg's cereal product with a similar name, IRS has a "Special K" for the self-employed which could finally cleanse out your investment tract of bad habits, and put you back in control of your retirement goals. [MORE]

Make My Day
YOU'RE OUTTA HERE!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Pity poor Cole Bartiromo. [MORE]

Happy Birthday, America!

Momentum
AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE MEANS SOMETHING ON LT. SPAULDING'S HILL

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "Auction March 2, 1871" reads the poster announcing the sale of a 65-acre farm belonging to "the late widow Spaulding." There was "running water to house and barn, plenty of wood on the place and a very good apple orchard." Also one pair of oxen weighing 3,800 pounds together, two cows, a three-year-old steer "nearly fat," a Spring calf, a horse, a "cosset sheep" and a cart. [MORE]

On Native Ground
USE TO AMERICA: CAN YOU HANDLE THE TRUTH?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If you thought President Bush's "Top Gun" photo-op on the flight of the U.S.S Abraham Lincoln was the ultimate in political opportunism, just wait until the 2004 Republican National Convention. [MORE]

Media Beat
WHY THE FCC'S RULES MATTER
by Norman Solomo

SAN FRANCISCO -- Media outlets are the lifeblood of the body politic. Extensive circulation of ideas, information, analysis and debate must exist - not just once in a while, but all the time - or the consequences are severe, even catastrophic. [MORE]

Momentum
THE CREEPING KEENE-ISM OF BRATTLEBORO
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Call me elitist. [MORE]

Make My Day
IT'S A NICE PLACE TO VISIT, BUT ...
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- We live in an interesting country with some pretty interesting names. Nowhere else in the world can names of cities induce the same laughs, guffaws, and rolled eyes that American cities can. At least, that's what I'm told. I don't get out much. [MORE]

Reporting: OKC Bombing
TERRY NICHOLS HELD FOR MURDER TRIAL
by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, May 13, 2003 -- The man already serving a federal life term for conspiracy in the Oklahoma City federal building bombing was held over for state court trial Tuesday on 160 counts of first-degree murder. [MORE]

Ink Soup
WHY I MISS THE WAR
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE. Wash.--I miss the war. No, honestly. It was better to have a subject that you had to avoid than to have no subject at all. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
GENTLE SHADES OF JAYSON BLAIR
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Surprising how long it took for the New York Times to discover its 27-year-old reporter Jayson Blair was fabricating the truth in his articles. They had a "heads up" on July 21, 2001, when the paper unearthed an investigation at the University of Virginia where 122 students were suspected of plagiarizing the term paper for a course in physics. [MORE]

American Essay
ZAPPAS, MENUHINS AND MUTHAS
by Lionel Rolfe

LOS ANGELES -- I suppose it's ironic that my mother, who died a year or so ago and taught me to reject Mother's Day for its crass commercialism, didn't hang around long enough to see me publish a book called "My Brother Was A Mother." [MORE]

Congratulations to Norman Solomon
upon winning
The ACLU of South Bay
1st Annual Upton Sinclair "Uppie" Award

Media Beat
AN INTROSPECTIVE MEDIA IS NOT IN THE CARDS

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- A new poll tells us that - by a two-to-one margin - Americans "use clearly positive words in their descriptions of the president." The Pew Research Center, releasing a nationwide survey on May 7, declared "there is little doubt ... that the war in Iraq has improved the president's image" in the United States. [MORE]

On Native Ground
PRESIDENT USE'S DUBIOU.S. ECONOMIC ACHIEVEMENTS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In the first two years of George W. Bush's presidency, more than two million Americans lost their jobs. He's well on his way to becoming the first president since Herbert Hoover to preside over an actual decline in employment in the U.S. [MORE]

Breakthrough: SARS
HOPE FOR A QUICK CURE FOR SARS IS RISING
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, May 9, 2003 -- Chances that a proposed drug for use against SARS will prove effective against the deadly pneumonia epidemic were sharply improved by findings that only insignificant mutations are occurring in the cornoavirus identified as its cause, according to a respected British medical journal, making it a stable target for rapidly-produced "antisense" drugs that prime the immune system to prepare it for the SARS virus and then attack it when the victim is infected. [MORE]

Momentum
THE ANTI-SPIDER-MAN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What does it mean when, in the same week, New Hampshire's Old Man of the Mountain crumbles to the ground, a horse named Funny Cide beats horses named Empire Maker and Peace Rules in the Kentucky Derby, and, more to the point, President George W. Bush steps off a plane onto an aircraft carrier with what looks like a banana stuffed into his pants? [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE DEATH AND RESURRECTION OF DR. SOUP
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Dr. Soup was happily signing copies of his latest book "How to Get Credit for Writing Ink Soup Without Actually Writing It," when a woman whom he vaguely recognized as one of his former wives took a Colt .45 out of her purse, smiled briefly, and shot him through the forehead. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
LETTERS FROM A MOVIE FAN
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Dear Mr. Hoyt: I've wanted to write a fan letter to you since at least 1970. Every time the thought came to me, I realized I didn't know your name. Well, today that's no excuse. Through the Internet, I can find anyone using the smallest bit of information and I've discovered your name and, sadly, that you died in 1991. [MORE]

Market Mover
REFLECTIONS ON WHAT AMERICA IS
by Mark Sscheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., May 5, 2003 -- Much of the world is still debating the rationale and results of the U.S. battlefield victory in Iraq, so maybe it's time for this non-politician to reflect on the true greatness of our land. [MORE]

On Native Ground
DID THE IRAQI ARMY TAKE A DIVE FOR THE U.S.?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- After the opening week of battle in Iraq, many feared the worst. [MORE]

Breakthrough: SARS
A STOCK SOARS AND STALLS ON HOPE OF SARS CURE
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, May 3, 2003 -- Depending on who was asked, the chief scientist of a widely held drug development firm that has released a potential cure for SARS was flying back Friday to Portland, Ore., from a business trip to Las Vegas, or at the company's labs in Corvallis, Ore., or at corporate headquarters in Portland, Ore. Back in New York, though, shares of his company, AVI BioPharma, were falling 11 percent on the Nasdaq stock exchange, and tight-lipped company officials and government media personnel were unable to say yet whether the firm's anti-SARS drug, which is reportedly being tested at U.S. Army facilities at Ft. Detrick in Frederick, Md., is effective against the new disease. [MORE]

PLAYING SPIN THE BATTLE: 'SHOCK AND AWE' AND AMERICAN IGNORANCE
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- More than half of all Americans believe that Saddam Hussein was personally involved in the 9/11 terrorist attacks. According to an Associated Press poll conducted shortly after the conclusion of the successful invasion of Iraq, 53 percent of the nation pin the 9/11 murders on Saddam, something the CIA and most of the world's intelligence-gathering organizations have consistently discounted. [MORE]

Media Beat
A DIFFERENT APPROACH FOR THE 2004 CAMPAIGN
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Eighteen months from now, citizens will vote for president. If the 2004 campaign is anything like the last one, the election returns will mark the culmination of a depressing media spectacle. [MORE]

Make My Day
THE #1 REASON FISHING IS MUCH SAFER
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Let's say you're a professional big game hunter hunting lions in Tanzania. [MORE]

Breakthrough: SARS
An AR Exclusive: AMERICAN FIRM CREATES FIRST RAPID TEST FOR SARS
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- The first quick and reliable test to detect the deadly SARS virus in humans is in the hands of the U.S. Army's Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (U.S.AMRIID) and has been shipped to the World Health Organization, the American Reporter has learned. The test was developed by a privately-held life sciences firm, EraGen Biosciences, of Madison, Wisc. [MORE]

Momentum
TAKE YOUR MOTHER TO WORK DAY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Hey, Mom just got a job. [MORE]

Ink Soup
APPROACHING SANDRA
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Walking on the treadmill and watching (with no audio) the tv instant captions, the source of infinite hilarity, I read that one American division in Iraq was proud of being called the tip of the sphere (spear, I suppose). Another: swept on by the tied of war. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: TABOO!
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Are there any left? Taboos, that is. Personally, I still hold a few: for instance, I would never wear a plaid shirt with striped slacks - never - and yet it's perfectly acceptable today, in fact designers plan a line around that concept. [MORE]

Market Mover
LOOTING 101 AND OTHER TIPS FOR THE PREZ
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., April 29, 2003 -- The looting of museums, stores, banks, and homes in Iraq provides the latest example of a political dictum politicians often forget. It's called K.I.S.S.: Keep It Simple, Stupid. [MORE]

On Native Ground
REBUILDING IRAQ BY SELLING OUT THE IRAQIS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- War, as Karl von Clausewitz wrote, is "nothing but the continuation of state policy with other means." [MORE]

Preview
MICHAEL MOORE, NORMAN SOLOMON TO BE HONORED BY A.C.L.U.
by Dan Pasley

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- Academy Award-winning director and producer Michael Moore and American Reporter Correspondent Norman Solomon are among seven public figures who will be honored on Friday, May 9, at the ACLU's First Annual Upton Sinclair Freedom of Expression Awards in the Los Angeles harbor community of San Pedro. The awards honor personal achievements in categories including Journalism, Political Courage, Personal Activism, Media Activism and Muckraking (Moore's category). [MORE]

Media Beat
MEDIA NIX TO BLIX, KUCINICH AND DIXIE CHICKS
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Hans Blix, Dennis Kucinich and the Dixie Chicks are in very different lines of work -- but they're in the same line of fire from big media for the sin of strongly challenging the president's war agenda. [MORE]

Make My Day
CAN I HOLD UP MY FINGER INSTEAD?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- When there are people in this world who don't have any food, electricity, or decent medical care, you have to wonder whether some people's priorities are askew. [MORE]

Momentum
THE WAR AT HOME: WHAT'S THE SCORE?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Randy and I were driving down to Hatfield, Mass., to spend Easter Sunday with his family when we decided not to talk about the war. [MORE]

Market Mover
AMERICAN AIRLINES: FLYING WITH THE DEVIL
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla.m April 23, 2003 -- Let's say you're anti-union. Always have been, always will be. Well, on this round, you can still root for the unionized employees of American Airlines. [MORE]

Ink Soup
ADMINISTER THIS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Here is an exercise in translation. Suppose the U.S.A were something like Iraq. Could we draw a sort of cultural map? [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
PUBLIC ENEMY NUMBER ONE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When I tried to find the list of America's Most Wanted, I was referred to a television program by that name. No, I would say, not just a hit or miss, catch them where you can, turn them in, call an 800 number, no, not that Most Wanted List. I'm looking for Public Enemies number one through say, 100. I couldn't find it. [MORE]

Make My Day
AN ALTERNATIVE TO CORPORAL PUNISHMENT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I was never a big fan of spankings in school, mostly because I was on the receiving end (no pun intended). But I've always wondered if the discipline problems in schools can be directly linked to the elimination to corporal punishment. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
THE TERRORIST'S WIFE: AN INTERVIEW WITH THE WIFE OF THE MAN CHARGED WITH THE BALI BOMBING
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA - How do you feel when your beloved husband is suddenly arrested, dragged to jail, and then nationally publicized as the chief suspect in the Bali terrorist bombing that killed 202 people last October? [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE WAR I SAW
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I didn't watch a single minute of the Gulf War II coverage on television, but I saw what was happening in Iraq more clearly than I would have otherwise. [MORE]

Momentum
FOR LACK OF A 'BEAUTIFUL MIND'
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- For lack of a beautiful mind, I care about the Iraqi dead and wounded. I care about the looting and destruction. I care about the lies and hypocrisy of my government and what comes next: the profiteering and the attempt to convert the Iraqis to Christianity. [MORE]

MARK TWAINS SPEAKS TO U.S.: 'I AM AN ANTI-IMPERIALIST'
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- With U.S. troops occupying Iraq and the Bush administration making bellicose noises about Syria, let's consider some rarely mentioned words from the most revered writer in American history. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE UNNATURAL
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--It is a slander that my success is due to the fact that Bob Melvin, the new manager of the Seattle Mariners, was a student of mine. I gave him a C+. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE SECOND THING YOU CAN COUNT ON: TAXES
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- The first thing, of course, is death, and if what we've always heard - "The only two things you can count on are death and taxes" - then the longer I live, the more I realize it's true. We will die and we will pay taxes! [MORE]

Commentary
RAGE IS A ROAD WE HAVE NOT TRAVELED
by Martha Gibson

MONTPELIER, Vt. -- This morning, in my armchair, I sit weeping, still weeping from last night, when I tuned in to the news and witnessed yet another crime of rage. [MORE]

8th Anniversary Essay
FROM THE CHAOS OF ORDER
by Joe Shea

I had the good fortune last Thursday to attend a seminar at the University of Southern California on "The Economy and Iraq." All four experts - one was a knighted Englishman on loan to the college - told us of a gloomy world where oil shortages are a fact of life, strategic moves are costly and counterproductive, news media are increasingly compromised and the world economy is more fragile than ever. There was just one problem: all four were probably wrong. [MORE]

On Native Ground
KEEPING PEACE HARDER THAN WAGING WAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So the gloating has begun. [MORE]

Media Beat
A LETHAL WAY TO 'DISPATCH' THE NEWS
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- In times of war, journalists can serve as vital witnesses for the people of the world. So it's especially sinister when governments take aim at reporters and photographers. [MORE]

Festival Review
SEE THE UNEXPECTED AT S.F. FILM FESTIVAL
Gary Gach

SAN FRANCISCO, April 11, 2003 -- Film festivals of all kinds dot our cultural landscape, like mushrooms after Spring rains. But it wasn't always so: America's first film festival began 46 years ago. [MORE]

Make My Day
A HORSE WALKS INTO A BAR ...
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Erik is out of the office this week, so we are reprinting an old column in the hopes that no one will notice. [MORE]

The American Reporter
proudly celebrates today
Our 8th Anniversary
1995 - 2003

An AR Exclusive
WELL-CONNECTED IN L.A., ALLEGED CHINESE SPY GAVE THOU.S.ANDS TO REPUBLICAN CANDIDATES

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, April 10, 2003 -- The American Reporter has learned that Katrina Leung, an alleged Chinese spy, who was a director of the influential Los Angeles World Affairs Council and a longtime California Republican Party activist, was a donor to Republican candidates at least since 1998 and as recently as last December. She was arrested and charged with espionage Wednesday in Los Angeles Federal Court. [MORE]

BAGHDAD FALLS!

American Reporter Staff

BAGHDAD, Iraq, April 9, 2003 -- Cheering crowds filled the streets of central Baghdad Wednesday as a Marine tank crew helped Iraqis tear down a huge cast-iron statue of Saddam Hussein and saw them drag the dictator's bullet-riddled symbolic head down a broad central avenue while his former subjects kicked and spat on it. [MORE]

Editorial
INTO THE WINDS OF WAR
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, April 8, 2003 -- Will the Arab world see the U.S. capture of Baghdad as fair compensation for the loss of the World Trade Center towers and 3,000 American lives? As strange as that question may seem, its answer will probably be central to the way Americans are seen in the Middle East long after the battle for Iraq has ended. [MORE]

THE VERMONT WINTER OF MY DISCONTENT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I don't mind admitting that this long Vermont winter has me whipped. [MORE]

Ink Soup
HIS CONVICTION IS PROOF OF CHARACTER
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- One of the four ministers of my church is Peter Ilgenfritz, an intense young man with definite views about how the precepts of religion should be honored in our actual life. [MORE]

Commentary
OSAMA: UNWANTED, DEAD OR ALIVE?
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON -- Without a Ouija board to provide the right answer, logical interpretation of the facts suggests that Osama bin Laden died in late 2001. [MORE]

Open Letter: MY OSCAR 'BACKLASH'
by Michael Moore

PARIS -- Dear friends: It appears that the Bush administration will have succeeded in colonizing Iraq sometime in the next few days. This is a blunder of such magnitude - and we will pay for it for years to come. It was not worth the life of one single American kid in uniform, let alone the thousands of Iraqis who have died, and my condolences and prayers go out to all of them. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
PULL YOUR PANTS UP!
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- A decade or two ago, teenage girls - and eventually most women up to about 35 - wore "hip huggers." This was before the advent of bare belly buttons; these pants were worn with a long-line "poor boy sweater," a skinny-ribbed fashion mus that was tucked in, held down low on the hips hung by a wide leather belt. [MORE]

Analysis
FOUR HALF-TRUTHS AND A WAR
by Dr. Louis Klarevas

LONDON -- When prosecuting crimes in a court of law, we are required to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. When prosecuting wars in the court of public opinion, though, it seems that half-truths are sufficient for making the case. This is evident in the current American-led war against Saddam Hussein's regime in Iraq. [MORE]

On Native Ground
NO WAR PLAN SURVIVES FIRST CONTACT WITH THE ENEMY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Who knows better about sending a military force into battle? The generals and planners at the Pentagon or an administration that's heavy on ideology but extremely light on combat experience? [MORE]

War On Iraq
U.S. TROOPS IN BAGHDAD; NO BANNED WEAPONS FOUND
American Reporter Staff

LOS ANGELES, April 4, 2003 -- U.S. and allied troops pushed closer to the center of Baghdad today without encountering significant resistance or any of the weapons of mass destruction that were the principal reason for the war. At the same time, the lack of resistance suggests that U.S. military experts made a critical error in 1991 when they failed to take the first Gulf War to the conclusion that was sought today. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE THICK FOG OF WAR ON AMERICAN TELEVISION
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Minutes after the dawn spread daylight across the Iraqi desert, "embedded" CNN correspondent Walter Rodgers was on the air with a live report. Another employee at the network, former U.S. Gen. Wesley Clark - on the job in a television studio back home -- asked his colleague a question. When Rodgers responded, he addressed Clark as "general" and "sir." The only thing missing was a salute. [MORE]

Momentum
THE MANY IRONIES OF WAR
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We're living in a time of funhouse mirrors - without the fun. [MORE]

Make My Day
YOU WANT ME TO WHAT YOUR WHAT?!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- There's a great scene in "Monty Python's Life of Brian" where Stan (a man) announces to his fellow members of the People's Front of Judea that he wants to be a woman, " ... because I want to have babies." [MORE]

Ink Soup: THE YEARS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- In case the news has depressed you lately, I have a remedy: go to what Walter Winchell used to call the moompitcher show. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: THE CLUMSY FEET OF APRIL
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Is there a poet with thoughts of a new beginning who doesn't turn those thoughts toward April? The muse imbues their steadying thought: that once again in the tufts of grass, small buds sprouting on dead branches, and in a glimpse of yellow or red or green bleeding through shoots pushed up from the cold earth, April is here. [MORE]

Caring
CUYAMACA SUNDAY MORNING COMIN' 'ROUND
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Breakfast at the lake. Hot coffee and wind on the water. We came up early Sunday morning just to get out of time - town, I mean. [MORE]

Commentary
ON WAR DAY, USE NOTE ENCOURAGED NAVY GRAD
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- Although the occasion received little coverage, United States Attorney General John Ashcroft's son Andrew graduated from Navy Officer Candidate School on March 20 from the Pensacola Naval Air Station. My longtime friend Dave McDermott's son Sean was his roomate, and when I had lunch with Dave on Thursday, he told me some nice stories and showed some snapshots. [MORE]

Media Beat
MEDIA OBSESSED WITH WARTECH, WARTAC
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTION -- Two months ago, when I wandered through a large market near the center of Baghdad, the day seemed like any other and no other. A vibrant pulse of humanity throbbed in the shops and on the streets. Meanwhile, a fuse was burning; lit in Washington, it would explode here. [MORE]

On Native Ground
GULF WAR II: U.S. AND BRITAIN DEFY INTERNATIONAL LAW
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Picture President Bush and Saddam Hussein sharing a cell in The Hague after they have been tried and convicted for crimes against humanity. [MORE]

Make My Day
PROPAGANDA PRACTICES IN PRESIDENTIAL PALACES OF THE PERSIAN GULF
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- While the war rages on in Iraq, one segment of the battle isn't being fought with guns and bombs, but with words. [MORE]

Momentum
SHOULD WE MARCH FOR PEACE IN A TIME OF WAR?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- War or peace, war or peace. Which side are you on? [MORE]

Commentary
A PRAYER FOR THE WAR
by Joe Shea

If I were President of the United States, even though I am a Catholic and would feel compelled to make the Sign of the Cross before I began, I would have started this war with a prayer. I would have said to our Maker, "God, I know that war is an abysmal failure I have come to; I am here in the place where my heart cannot forgive and my mind cannot be at peace; I must make war, however wrong. I am human, God, and full of flaws and errors; forgive me my shortcomings, and do not let them be the cause of hardship and misery for my brave soldiers, who must fight for me in the terrible days ahead. Forgive my my arrogance, for I have not humility, though I would have it; forgive me my pride, for I have not innocence, though I would; forgive me my anger, for I do not have peace within me; forgive me the dark angels of my spirit, Lord of All, for I do not have your angels on my side." [MORE]

Ink Soup
HOW TO IN TEN
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, WASH. -– Hello, boys and girls, this is your uncle, Doctor Soup, here to give you, gratis, one of the great lessons in living. I'm going to tell you how to write a newspaper column when you grow up. [MORE]

War On Iraq
SANDSTORM SLOWS ALLIED PUSH; STOCKS RECOVER AS USE DECLARES, 'WE WILL PREVAIL'
American Reporter Staff

MARCH 25, 3:35pm EST -- A blinding sandstorm dramatically slowed the allied advance on Baghdad late Monday as supply lines stretching 250 miles southwards into Kuwait were attacked by irregulars and Iraqi Army units that had been bypassed by the main coalition force. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
CONQUER WE MU.S.T*
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- President George W. Bush stood before all of us that Inauguration Day in 2001, raised his right hand, and said aloud: "I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States." He is taking care of business; let him do his job. [MORE]

War On Iraq
SADDAM ON IRAQI T.V.; CHEMICAL ARMS PLANT FOUND; STOCKS DOWN IN LONDON; TURKS WARNED
American Reporter Staff

LOS ANGELES. March 24, 2003 2:40am -- Saddam Hussein made a live appearance on Iraqi television Monday, hailing his troops and bringing a close to speculation that he is dead or badly injured. [MORE]

Caring
THE DELICATE ETIQUETTE OF DEATH
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I am about as pro-life as they come, yet when it comes to control over the time, place and manner of our deaths, I refuse to be so dogmatic. There is a big difference between someone taking a life that is not their own, and wanting to end one's own life when it has become unbearable due to terminal illness. [MORE]

Market Mover
FROM ANTWERP TO BOCA: RANDOM NOTES AT DAWN OF WAR
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., March 24, 2003 -- I was in Paris the day Gulf War II broke out. Two days later I was back in Florida with a head full of notes. A few newspapers and Websites call me a business columnist. But I'll always be an old New York and New Jersey police reporter at heart. [MORE]

War On Iraq
COALITION BOMBS BAGHDAD AS U.S. CASUALTIES RISE; U.S. SOLDIER KILLS 1, WOUNDS 13; U.S. PATRIOT MISSILE DOWNS BRITISH PLANE
American Reporter Staff

BAGHDAD, March 23, 2003, 3:20am -- As muezzins called the faithful to prayer in Baghdad this Sunday morning, coalition bombers unloaded their ordnance on a silent, sleeping Baghdad where not even anti-aircraft tracers rose to resist. That was not the case near the southern port city of Basra and inland Nasiriyah, however, an critical "hub" city where war commander Gen. Tommy Franks said caolition forces had suffered "significant" casualties in their rapid march towards Baghdad. [MORE]

'SHOCK AND AWE!'

American Reporter Staff

BAGHDAD, March 22, 2003, 2:45am -- In a blinding series of bomb blasts the Gulf War II coalition unleashed the promised "shock and awe" campaign Friday morning, even as the U.S. reported its first in-combat casualties, encountered the first significant resistance, and an Iraqi division leader surrendered to the Marines as they pushed towards Iraq's capital. [MORE]

Reporting: Bulgaria
BULGARIA, LONELY U.S. ALLY IN IRAQ FIGHT, SHARED CONCERN FOR JEWS
by Lionel Rolfe

SOFIA, Bulgaria -- My guide here, Boriana Andreewa, must have been a bit confused about whether I really wanted to see Sofia's Central Synagogue. In the morning, she asked if I wanted to; I did and didn't, I said, sounding negative when I really did want to go. She didn't mention it again until we were walking in central Sofia; it was nearby and we would be there in a moment. [MORE]

A.R. Exclusive
PRO-WAR PROTEST OK'D FOR OSCAR SITE, BUT ANTI-WAR PROTEST BARRED
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- An Orange County-based coalition of Vietnamese Republicans announced Friday that they will demonstrate with a well-known homeless leader on Sunday the corner of Hollywood Blvd. and Highland Ave., the site of the 75th Annual Academy Awards, even though that area is off-limits to protests, Hollywood Division Capt. Michael Downing toldf the American Reporter this afternoon. [MORE]

ANARCHY-TINGED PORTLAND PROTESTS MAY SPREAD
by Joshua Frank

PORTLAND, Ore., March 21, 2003 -- Several thousand protesters descended upon downtown Portland Thursday afternoon and stayed until some were arrested Friday morning in the second major protest of the U.S. invasion of Iraq here since last Saturday. [MORE]

On Native Ground
A DUTY TO SPEAK UP
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle expressed the views of many in America when he said: "I am saddened that this President failed so miserably at diplomacy that we're now forced to war. Saddened that we have to give up one life, because this President couldn't create the kind of diplomatic effort that was so critical for our country." [MORE]

Art Review
SAN FRANCISCO ENCOUNTERS THE ARTS OF WAR AND PEACE IN A SPLENDID NEW MUSUM
by Gary Gach

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., March 20, 2003 -- Many events were preempted in the news media by the American attack on Iraq. Ironically, one of the most important event is the opening of the new Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, a profoundly appropriate place for meditating on humanity's hopes in a time of war. [MORE]

12 DEAD IN GULF CRASH

American Reporter Staff

KUWAIT CITY, Kuwait, March 21, 2003 -- The first confirmed coalition casualties of the War on Iraq came late Thursday as an American helicopter carrying British and U.S. troops crashed in Kuwait, killing at least 12 men. [MORE]

Media beat
CASUALTIES OF WAR: FIRST TRUTH, THEN CONSCIENCE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- The national media echo chamber is not receptive to conscience. On television, the voices are usually loud and facile. People often seem to be shouting. In contrast, the human conscience is close to a whisper. Easily unheard. [MORE]

Momentum: MASTERS OF WAR
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Whenever my beloved America makes the mistake of choosing might over right, I turn to Bob Dylan's early masterpiece, "Masters of War." [MORE]

City Beat
THE HIGH COST OF DOING WAR
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, March 18, 2003 -- The new police chief Los Angeles acquired from New York came before its City Council today and along with its longtime top fireman made an emergency plea for millions of dollars for radiation detection gear and high-tech hazard suits to gird its first responders - firemen, paramedics and policemen - against "dirty bombs" and other terrorist attacks aimed at retaliation for America's war on Iraq. [MORE]

Ink Soup: JIFFY SOUP
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Back in the days when I made my living intra muros - within the walls, of the academy, that is - I was troubled from time to time by a recurrent nightmare. [MORE]

Brasch Words
HIGH NOON IN THE DESERT
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- The capture of Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, believed to be the man who created the 9/11 plot, proves a couple of things. [MORE]

Market Mover
MORE THAN JUST IRAQ STRAINS EUROPE'S FUTURE
by Mark Scheinbaum

ANTWERP, Belgium, Mar. 18, 2003 -- Queen Elizabeth cancelled a visit to Belgium this past week because of international tensions, and one London daily's headlines now spell the name of France's Jacques Chirac as Chiraq. These are just signs of rough times between the Euro World, the United Kingdom World, and the Rest of the World. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
GRIFTERS, CON ARTISTS, FLIM FLAMS, GYPSIES AND SCAMS
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It's not original to say, but there's no better way to say it: "The more things change, the more they remain the same." [MORE]

FIRST U.S. CASE OF MYSTERY PNEUMONIA SU.S.PECTED IN LOS ANGELES
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, March 17, 2003 -- Los Angeles Co. Health Department officials reported this afternoon that a suspected single case of SARS, a previously unknown form of pneumonia that started in China last month and threatens to become an epidemic, has been reported here in a man who flew in from the Far East and passed through LAX last week, the agency said today. [MORE]

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

Editorial
A WAR THAT CANNOT BE MADE RIGHT

by Joe Shea

The dogs of war are barking fiercely in their fragile cages tonight, and it appears they may be break loose any day now. North Korea has begun production of plutonium, the fine white powder that is deadlier than anthrax and far easier to distribute - if it has soldiers willing to go on suicide missions. The linkage between those two events is imaginary, but it only awaits the imagination of a strategic planner and logistics expert to bind these and any other threads of horror into a cohesive plan to hurt the United States. Indeed, we also suspect that al-Qaida will soon strike wherever America, Britain and Spain are vulnerable. We believe the rage that is building against the United States will not be slaked by war, but by terror that comes here again, and again, and again. [MORE]

Caring
TEA ON THE NINTH HOLE
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- The closest thing to Mr. Magoo I've ever seen. The proverbial ugly cute thing: bald with residual tufts of withered Pampas grass covering the temples on both sides. At least there's basic symmetry in the shrubbery that's left on the great white dome. His glasses' lens are so thick his magnified blue eyes look like ocular carp swimming in aqueous fluid. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE ESSENCE OF WAR IS DEATH
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "War today is smells ... smells of chemicals being dropped from the sky to set houses on fire. Smells from burning oil dumps. Smells of roasting human flesh. [MORE]

Make My Day
'THAT'S NOT A KNIFE. THIS IS A KNIFE'
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I have Zero Patience for Zero Tolerance. It's narrow, unwavering, and rigid in its enforcement, and allows for absolutely no flexibility on the part of its zealots. [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
POWELL BLAMED FOR 'MISTAKE' IN MY LAI MASSACRE
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Calif., March 13, 2003 -- A former White House covert operations official has told The American Reporter that Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, then a military aide to the U.S. Army command staff in Vietnam, misunderstood a general's instructions and mistakenly ordered the notorious March 16, 1968, My Lai massacre, and successfully covered up his error until now. The former official's allegations concerning the events, whose 35th anniversary occurs on Sunday, could not immediately be confirmed. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE CONVENTIONAL MEDIA WISDOM OF OBEDIENCE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- As the possibility of a U.S. invasion turns into the reality of massive carnage, the war on Iraq cannot avoid confronting Americans with a tacit expectation that rarely gets media scrutiny. In a word: obedience. [MORE]

Momentum
WHERE HAS ALL THE MONEY GONE?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Town Meetings are over for another year, and like people all over the country, Vermonters are in sticker shock. [MORE]

Burns Out
'ONCE MORE UNTO THE BREACH' - OF TRU.S.T
by Maggie Burns

WASHINGTON -- Shakespeare's Henry the Fifth contains some of the great warlike speeches of all time -- "Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more!" - and its poetry has been pillaged for every English war since it was written in 1599. [MORE]

Ink Soup
CRYPTIC CLUES
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- It is humiliating for an old newspaper veteran such as your humble servant to learn so late in life a saying that might have eased his burden far sooner. I pass it along, since it concerns you as much as it does me, for you, the newspaper reader, are in fact the party meant by "they." [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WILL HAD A WAY
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- In simpler times, when The New York Times first printed the words, "All the news that's fit to print," it, and newspapers all over the country, was the source we turned to to learn what was happening in the world. [MORE]

Caring
BIRDSONGS FOR ALCATRAZ
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Mornings can be difficult. I am not sure why that is but I do know that sometimes birdsong can save your soul. Their sweet melodies pierce through the viscous muck of depression that clings to me in the early hours of the day. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE LAMPS ARE GOING OUT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- This is a very weird time. [MORE]

Media Beat
U.S MEDIA DODGES U.N. SURVEILLANCE STORY
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Three days after a British newspaper revealed a memo about U.S. spying on U.N. Security Council delegations, I asked Daniel Ellsberg to assess the importance of the story. "This leak," he replied, "is more timely and potentially more important than the Pentagon Papers." [MORE]

Market Mover
WELCOME TO THE NO CODE, DRESS CODE
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., March 6, 2003 -- It was a modest inquiry about dress codes or the lack thereof, but it triggered thoughtful, diverse, and sometimes rip-roaring responses. [MORE]

Editorial
WHEN WILL THE WAR BE?
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, March 6, 2003 -- As he prepares to speak to the world tonight, President Bush surveys a diplomatic landscape more daunting than any Bosnian minefield. The reluctance of Russia, France and Germany - and now, formally, China - to support a second resolution authorizing the use of force against Saddam Hussein's Iraqi regime has irrecoverably stranded his team's effort to get the world on his side on a proposed invasion of Iraq. [MORE]

Make My Day
I'VE GOT THIS BRIDGE I'D LIKE TO SELL YOU
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I realized I had finally made my mark in the world when I received my very own Nigerian scam letter, addressed to me. When Nigerian scam artists put your name on a letter, rather than addressing it with an impersonal "Dear Friend," you've obviously done something important. [MORE]

Momentum
IF PROTESTING DOESN'T WORK, THEN PARTY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- O.K., you've sent your plastic baggies of white rice to the President of the United States, marched in freezing weather several times for peace, gotten into the habit of reading the on-line international papers to glean some real news, listened to poetry being read up the yin-yang, given money to MoveOn - and it still hasn't made a damn bit of difference. [MORE]

City Beat
FOR PARKS AND VILLARAIGOSA, VICTORY IS SWEET
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, March 4, 2003 -- Voters in Los Angeles tonight elected two men whose stories, although very different, converged in both ruin and redemption. They may diverge from here on in, though; political gadfly Melrose Larry Green joked that their presence on the council will make it "a better show than anything in Las Vegas." [MORE]

Ink Soup
LOW DOWN: A FABLE SANS MORAL
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.-- Low is dead. Bereft of this word, the world of advertising is, for once, at a loss for words. There is a scramble to find an alternative to "shocked disbelief." [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
'SHAKE THE HAND THAT SHOOK THE HAND...'
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- The title of this coluimn is taken from a 1942 movie called "Gentleman Jim," starring Errol Flynn as world heavyweight champion James Corbett. He knocked out John L. Sullivan, a champ and world-renowned celebrity who held the title for over a decade, from 1882 to 1892, and was the last of the bare-knuckled fighters. [MORE]

Caring
PLIGHT OF THE ELDERLY IN A THROW AWAY WORLD
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I just sat through several hours of committee meetings where I was presenting our new model of community elder care to the county planning group for funding. There were proposals for skate parks and for trees and for new alleys. There were checks handed out: tens of thousands of dollars for basketball courts, new roads, and libraries and more. [MORE]

City Beat
C.R.A. ASKS $50,000 TO MEND 'CONFLICT OF INTEREST' IN HOUSING JAM
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 28, 2003 -- Less than 10 hours after The American Reporter revealed that desperately needed new low-income senior housing in Hollywood remains vacant months after it was fully rented and ready for elderly tenants, the Los Angeles City Council quietly sent a CRA request for $50,000 to pay a famously expensive Hollywood law firm after it learned of "a potential conflict of interest" in yet another low-income housing portion of controversial redevelopment projects at Hollywood Blvd. and Western Ave. [MORE]

On Native Ground
10 THINGS MORE LIKELY TO KILL YOU THAN TERRORISM
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Now that the nation is back at Code Yellow, do you feel safer yet? [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT WOULD A SNOW MICHAEL JACKSON LOOK LIKE?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Let's face it. Some people have an overinflated sense of Righteous Indignation, and treat every inconvenience in life at the same level. Whether someone tried to run them off the road, or the supermarket is out of their favorite brand of salad dressing, the Righteously Indignant people will respond as if someone has just put a flaming bag of dog poo on the coffee table without a coaster. [MORE]

City Beat
NEW SENIOR HOUSING SITS EMPTY AS OWNERS ARGUE OVER 'AIR RIGHTS'
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 28, 2003 -- How can it be? In a low-income community where rents are soaring, some seniors are homeless and many are suffering rent increases that strain their fixed-income budgets to the breaking point, 100 brand-new low-income apartments built expressly for them - and 12 years in the making - remain completely vacant months after they were rented and ready. [MORE]

Media Beat
NEWSWEEK STORY ON IRAQI WEAPONS NEEDS ANOTHER LOOK
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- You gotta hand it to America's mass media: When war hangs in the balance, they sure know how to bury a story. [MORE]

Momentum
PLEASE, JUST GET USED TO IT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In December, a New York Post gossip columnist ran a "blind item" (no names) about a retired baseball legend who cooperated with his biographer when the writer promised not to reveal his homosexuality. [MORE]

City Beat
LACK OF HOTEL COULD CLOSE CONVENTION CENTER, ANSCHUTZ WARNS
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, February 26, 2003 -- Mention the news that broke yesterday about the arrests of four high-ranking executives of Denver-based billionaire Philip Anschutz's Qwest communications empire, and his Los Angeles-based representative at the Staples Center cringes. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE BU.S. OF TIME
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. --Each time I walk through the dining room, my eyes caress briefly the beloved image of my "black grandmother," Corrie Scott, in an oil portrait that I painted as an adolescent. My grandmother in all but biological fact, she was an orphan left to the care of my grandfather by her dying mother and raised almost as a daughter in his family. [MORE]

Market Mover
TRU.S.T CBS-TV? I'D 'RATHER' NOT
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Feb. 25, 2003 -- At this writing, it seems to me that CBS-TV News anchor Dan Rather has been snookered by Saddam Hussein and his handlers. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WHO'S AFRAID OF THE IDES OF MARCH?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga, -- It really is much ado about nothing, if I may steal a line from Shakespeare. In his play, "Julius Caesar," the Bard has Brutus saying to Lucius: "Get you to bed again; it is not day. Is not tomorrow, boy, the ides of March?" Whereupon, Lucius responds, "I know not, sir." Brutus dismisses him with "Look in the calendar, and bring me word." And, Lucius answers, "I will sir." Exit. [MORE]

Caring
IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO PREVENT ELDER ABUSE
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO --- We were out on the deck of the mountain cabin having wine and talking out of earshot of her father. His daughter was telling me of the woman who had swooped in on him after her mother's death two years previously. In those two years, this woman had systematically taken control and isolated him from his three daughters. [MORE]

Essay
AN APOCALYPSE IS JUST WHAT THIS SINFUL OLD WORLD NEEDS
by Lionel Rolfe

LOS ANGELES -- I don't like to hang out in large crowds, but there I was on a recent Saturday, one of some 75,000 or so people who marched along Hollywood Boulevard in a spirited effort to tell Mr. Bush that we don't want his stinking war. [MORE]

On Native Ground
FRIENDS DON'T LET FRIENDS START UNNECESSARY WARS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's been amusing watching the pro-war crowd get worked up over what the New York Post dubbed "the axis of weasel." [MORE]

City Beat
AS WAR RESOLUTION PASSES, PACHECO PORTRAYED AS HERO AND VILLAIN
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, February 21, 2003 -- With a hotly-contested antiwar resolution making its final apearance on the council floor and Los Angeles ready to become the nation's largest city to endorse it, East Los Angeles City Councilman Nick Pacheco stood up to cast the critical eighth and deciding vote - even as he was being vilified on the front page of a Los Angeles Times news section in a story implying he'd directed public money into his own down-to-the-wire reelection campaign. [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
AMERICA'S SECRET WAR IN IRAQ IS UNDERWAY
by Mark Scheinbaum

FORT BENNING, Ga., Feb. 20, 2001 -- A high ranking U.S. Army commander confirmed Wednesday that the same U.S. special operation teams which orchestrated CIa-Northern Alliance coalition efforts in Afghanistan are now inside Iraq and actively paving the way for expanded U.S. operations. He indicated that it was a part of the war on terror which could last four to six years to complete. [MORE]

Media Beat
'GLOBALIZATION' AND ITS MALCONTENTS
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- One of the big media buzzwords to emerge in recent years is "globalization." By now, we're likely to know what it means. That's unfortunate -- because at this point the word is so ambiguous that it doesn't really mean much of anything. [MORE]

Opinion
ANTIWAR PROTESTS MISS THE ANGER OF VETERANS
by Jimmy Montague

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa -- On Saturday, Feb. 15, 2003, the news was all of protest. Antiwar marches crowded the streets of Washington and other American cities. The protesters carried signs that read "No War for Oil," "No War for Revenge," "No War on the Iraqi People," "No Race War," "No Religious War," and "No War for Profit." [MORE]

Ink Soup
DEATH COMES FOR THE ARCH
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- Henry Martin has sent me a new book, a mystery set in the town where we both used to live, Princeton. It is a paperback with a cover containing words and a picture. [MORE]

Make My Day
WITH EDUCATION, EVERYONE'S A WINNER!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Cue the dueling banjos, it's the Battle Of The Valedictorians again! [MORE]

Travel: France
FRANCE NEVER LOOKED - OR TASTED - SO GOOD
by Adrian Maher

CHAMPAGNE/ARDENNES, France -- On previous trips to Paris, I've always yearned to venture outside its noise, crowds and high prices in search of the real France. [MORE]

Momentum
POETRY ON EARTH
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "I would like to thank Mrs. Bush for being so thin-skinned," the writer Jamaica Kincaid said on a cold and clear Sunday afternoon in Manchester, Vt. "To think that a woman who lies down at night and has dinner across from a man who is the lord and master of weapons of mass destruction, and plans to use them, could not listen to the words of some poets who disagree with him!" [MORE]

City Beat
BATTLING OVER PEACE, L.A. COUNCIL SPLITS ON WAR RESOLUTION
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 18, 2003 -- What can you say about a peace resolution that died? [MORE]

Brasch Words
SIGNS OF OUR TIMES
by Rosemary and Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- On a frigid Saturday afternoon, about 150 people stood in front of a 150-year-old brick courthouse in rural Bloomsburg, Pa., and called for an end to George W. Bush's impending war. [MORE]

Market Mover
HAS IRAQ II BEEN HISTORY'S BEST HEAD FAKE?
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- The coments below are ones I sent to a longtime friend in the investment business, who had asked my candid opinion about an imminent war against Iraq. [MORE]

Caring
THELMA AND THE SEA BIRDS
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Fred and I headed down the hill to the coast mid-morning and got breakfast on the way. The Original Grand Slam was cheaper than Senior Meal Deals, so we both got 'em. Then down through San Pasqual Valley to the 78. It was a gorgeous Sunday. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A WIND FROM THE NORTH
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When I hear the weatherman's voiceover, commenting on the oranges, blues, yellows and greens sweeping across a map of the United States, I stay focused on the Georgia coast, just above where it curves into the peninsula that is Florida. If I hear the words "a wind from the North ..." I pull my sweater closer around me and shudder a little. [MORE]

On Native Ground
HOW THE USE ADMINISTRATION GETS AWAY WITH IT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - My editor forwarded me this e-mail from a 15-year-old girl in Georgia. Her name is Karoline and this is what she had to say: [MORE]

Happy Valentine's Day!

City Beat
LAPD DENIES MEDIA CREDENTIALS TO L.A. TIMES, CNN, AMERICAN REPORTER

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 13, 2003 -- When a judge who is trying a controversial case here saw an American Reporter correspondent - dressed in a handsome black suit with a silver tie - sitting in his courtoom at about 4:30 in the afternoon recently, he was startled and chagrinned. [MORE]

Media Beat
PLAYING THE 'TERRORISM' CARD
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- These days, it's a crucial ace up Uncle Sam's sleeve. "Terrorism" is President George W. Bush's magic card. [MORE]

Make My Day
DO YOU HAVE ANY MICHAEL JOHNSON?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Whether you're an Olympic-caliber athlete or a weekend warrior, no longer will the "agony of defeat" refer to the stench coming from your running shoes. If you're a die-hard Olympic fan who misses the Olympic Spirit after the flame is extinguished, you're in luck. [MORE]

City Beat
SCIENTOLOGISTS OVERWHELM HOLLYWOOD COUNCIL RACE
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 13, 2003 -- In a naked show of power Wednesday night, some 500 Scientologists descended by the busload on a Neighborhood Council polling place at a local church with pre-marked sample ballots and proceeded to elect a slate of Scientology and other candidates, including Hillary Royce, the group's international spokesperson, by a huge margin. [MORE]

Momentum
VALENTINE TO A SMALL TOWN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- At the drive-thru line at my local credit union the other day, I got a fresh daisy along with my receipt. [MORE]

SEN. KERRY'S CANCER SURGERY CALLED SUCCESS
American Reporter Staff

BALTIMORE, Feb. 12, 2003 -- Sen. John F. Kerry emerged from surgery for prostate cancer without incident this morning, and his doctor said he should be able to leave the hospital in a few days. [MORE]

Festival Review
THE STATE OF CINEMA
Gary Gach

SAN FRANCISCO, April 10, 2003 -- North America's longest-running film festival returns for a 46th season, April 17 - May 1. Among the 200 films shown at this year's San Francisco International Film Festival (SFIFF), many are receiving prestigious prizes. [MORE]

City Beat
LOS ANGELES MAY TAKE STAND ON IRAQ WAR - OR MAY NOT
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 12, 2002 -- The City of Los Angeles on Thursday may become the largest municipality in the nation to take a formal position on a possible war with Iraq - and the issue has already sharply divided normally like-minded members of its City Council. [MORE]

Ink Soup
ABOARD THE BENTHIC, A BOTTOM LINE
by Clarence Brown

ABOARD THE SS BENTHIC -- The first thing I did, shortly after locating my quarters on this cruise ship, was to endear myself to the captain by asking whether he knew that the name of his vessel referred to the bottom of the sea? From Greek benthos? [MORE]

Market Mover
POETS SNUB WHITE HOUSE INVITATION
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Feb. 12, 2003 -- It all started with First Lady Laura Bush inviting a poet to the White House for a literary symposium in celebration of the life and times of Emily Dickinson. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
TIME OUT FOR LOVE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This time of year, I usually write about St. Valentine -- just in case there's someone out there who doesn't know the man behind the legend. Instead of telling the age old tale I grew up with, I decided to check early Church records looking for a new slant. [MORE]

AS MARINE EXPEDITIONARY BRIGADE SAILS TO GULF, WAR GROWS MORE LIKELY
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 9, 2003 -- Barring an unforeseen, last-minute eruption of peace, the United States may be at war with Iraq within weeks. [MORE]

Caring
SONGS AND PROVERBS FOR THE JOURNEY
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- "Around and around and around she goes, and whar she stops nobody knows." My grandfather used to say that. And when he really liked something he'd say, "It's the cat's meow." Funny that those simple and often silly one liners are what I remember about him the most.= [MORE]

On Native Ground

SELLING A WAR THAT FEW ARE BUYING

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Did Secretary of State Colin Powell's presentation to the United Nations Security Council on Feb. 5 convince you that Saddam Hussein poses such a grave threat to world peace that we must go to war with him as soon as possible? [MORE]

City Beat
COUNCIL BATTLES TIME AND SPACE IN L.A. HOUSING CRISIS
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 6, 2003 -- "This is a great day," said Councilwoman Wendy Greuel Thursday afternoon as she welcomed about 45 of the city's most influential housing policy wonks to a special session of her Housing & Economic Development Committee called to celebrate progress in building the largest municipal housing trust fund in the nation. [MORE]

Media Beat
COLIN POWELL IS FLAWLESS (NOT)
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- There's no doubt about it: Colin Powell is a great performer, as he showed yet again at the U.N. Security Council the other day. On television, he exudes confidence and authoritative judgment. [MORE]

Make My Day
GIMME AN 'A' ... OR ELSE!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- The American Legal System: We don't make the grade. We make the grade better. At least that's what one Memphis, Michigan high school senior thinks. [MORE]

Momentum
ON A BEAUTIFUL PLANET, SUCH TERRIBLE THINGS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In the week following the destruction of the space shuttle Columbia, the most enduring image was not the comet-like trail burning white across the blue Texas sky, or the charred helmet resting in the piney woods. It was the NASA footage of Col. Ilan Ramon, the handsome Israeli fighter pilot, floating out of a tunnel into a room full of weightlessness, his arms spread like a bird in flight and an expression of transcendental happiness upon his face. [MORE]

On Trial
MERCEDES-BENZ CLEARED IN HEATER CORE BURN CASE
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 5, 2003 -- Hours after a trio of plaintiffs in Phoenix settled similar cases with a different German automaker, a jury headed by Los Angeles City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to find that Mercedes-Benz was not negligent in the design and sale of cars containing heater core end caps that can explode and burn drivers, and awarded the Los Angeles plaintiff nothing. [MORE]

City Beat
L.A.'S FALSE ALARM BATTLE ENDS IN VICTORY FOR BRATTON
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- It was a battle royal from the beginning, but new Los Angeles Police Chief Bill Bratton has come off the battlefield nearly unbloodied and clutching a big war trophy - hundreds of police officers and hundreds of thousands of man-hours he freed from chasing a huge number of false alarms across a frightened city whose crime rate has soared in recent months. [MORE]

AR At Sundance
"The Art of the Documentary"

AR At Sundance
EMMETT TILL RISES AGAIN TO INDICT HIS TIMES

by Adrian Maher

PARK CITY, Utah -- Many Americans believe the seminal event of the civil rights movement was Rosa Parks' refusal to give up her bus seat in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955. Her actions and subsequent arrest ignited a massive black boycott of the city's bus system and sparked the emergence of a local preacher - the Reverend Martin Luther King - as a leader in a revolution that changed history. [MORE]

AR at Sundance
THE ILLUMINATED EDUCATION OF GORE VIDAL
by Adrian Maher

PARK CITY, Utah -- As a dramatist, novelist, actor, social satirist, public debater and troublemaker extraordinaire, Gore Vidal, for the past 50 years has skewered those in power with outrageous monologues and America's sharpest pen. He is a national literary treasure whose witty barbs and deeply researched and reflective historical novels have shed light on politics, sex, art and philosophy. [MORE]

Ink Soup: GYM DANDIES
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. Out here and I can't help it, I still think of myself as being out here, much to the chagrin of neighbors and friends, who think of the edge of the Pacific as being simply here I often recall "back there," where you are. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
TEAR DOWN THIS WALL - OF STUPIDITY!
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Most of us can mark our lives by events powerful enough to stop us right where stand. We can not go back and going forward is no longer predictable as it was just moments before. [MORE]

The Pooh Papers
DISNEY MOVES TO END POOH CASE, CHARGES MISCONDUCT
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 3, 2003 -- The Walt Disney Co. today asked a Superior Court Judge to hear evidence that Stephen Slesinger Inc.'s attorneys and principals stole documents, defied court orders, destroyed evidence and engaged in a pattern of "pervasive misconduct and illegal activities" as they sought royalty payments that are allegedly overdue during an 11-year battle with the studio, Disney's vice-president for corporate communications said Monday. [MORE]

On Trial
MERCEDES HEATER CORE CASE AVERTS MISTRIAL, GOES TO JURY
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 3, 2003 -- A closely-watched trial over automakers' responsibility for exploding heater parts that have injured scores of people in Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Volkswagen vehicles went to a Superior Court jury in Los Angeles this afternoon after a motion for a mistrial based on the discovery of an American Reporter article in the jury room was denied by Judge Emilie Elias. [MORE]

Brasch Words
TRAGIC INEQUALITIES
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- It happened so quickly - America gained heroes and lost bright, inquisitive, and patriotic men and women. Family members in just an instant plummeted from anticipation to agony. Spouses and children now planned memorial services. America lost 11 souls. [MORE]

Caring
DELIVER U.S. FROM THE OMINOU.S.
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Six feet tall and impending doom. What would it be like to live with that every day? I wondered that as I sat with my elder friend today. Her husband is loosing touch mentally. [MORE]

+ In Memoriam +
The Brave Crew of STS-107
"May They Guide Our Ships"

A SONNET FOR THE SHUTTLE CREW

by Joe Shea

HOU.S.TON, Feb. 1, 2003 -- The space shuttle Columbia was lost at approximately 8:58 a.m. EST this morning in a catastrophic explosion over Texas, possibly caused by damage to heat tiles on the left wing, which was struck by hardened foam blown off the booster tank at the time it separated from the shuttle shortly after takeoff from Cape Canaveral 16 days ago. [MORE]

Media Beat
WAITING FOR THE LORD IN DOWNTOWN BAGHDAD
by Norman Solomon

BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Picture yourself as an American reporter here in the Iraqi capital. [MORE]

On Native Ground
SEARCHING FOR TRUTH ABOUT THIS WAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Sam Smith, editor of The Progressive Review (prorev.com), recently offered what he called the "Standardized Conflagration Competency Exam." [MORE]

Make My Day
WOULD RUM WORK INSTEAD?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Abracadabra, make my common sense ... disappear! If only it were as easy as waving a magic wand. [MORE]

AFTER 7 YEARS OF WAR, CEASEFIRE COMES TO BLOODIED NEPAL
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Jan. 30, 2003 -- A ceasefire has been declared between government troops and Maoist rebels here to allow talks that might end seven years of insurgency that has claimed thousands of lives and bloodied the international image of this Himalayan kingdom. [MORE]

Reporting: Brazil
WORLD'S ACTIVISTS SEND A MESSAGE TO THE ECONOMIC ELITE
by Larry Bridwell

PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil -- "We need a new world economic order that distributes wealth more fairly so that impoverished countries have a chance of becoming less impoverished, so that African babies have the same right to eat as a blond, blue-eyed baby born in Scandinavia," Brazil's President Lula da Silva told tens of thousands of participants at the World Social Forum meeting in this southern port city last week. [MORE]

Market Mover
'TECHNICALS' WARN OF FOURTH BAD YEAR FOR STOCKS
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla. -- I hate to be the one to say we need to prepare for an unprecedented fourth straight down year in the major U.S. markets since 1926, but the charts are persuasive. [MORE]

Momentum
THE WAR AGAINST WOMEN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Watching President George W. Bush give his State of the Union speech Tuesday night, I thought about snakes. [MORE]

On Trial
FOR TRIAL LAWYERS, MERCEDES-BENZ HEATER CORE CASE IS RED HOT
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 29, 2002 -- One of the nation's most successful trial lawyers on Wednesday challenged an expert witness for Mercedes-Benz U.S.A as a closely watched trial on the automaker's liability for an exploding heater core that badly burned real estate salesman Albert Royas drew to a close before Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Emilie Elias and a jury that includes Los Angeles City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo, the city's top lawyer. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SARDINE, HAT, GLOBE...
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Why I associate it with London I am not sure. Perhaps it was because we were living in London in the late Sixties, early Seventies, and I seem to recall an article, probably in the TLS, in which someone argued that the design of Shakespeare's Globe Theater showed the influence of an ancient technique for remembering a complicated series of things, such as all the points and the subpoints in one of Cicero's orations. [MORE]

Editorial
POISED TO TRIUMPH
by Joe Shea

President George W. Bush came into his own last night in a powerful State of the Union address that made a strong case against Saddam Hussein and a great case for compassionate conservatism. In particular, the President's extensive and compelling comments about the spread of AIDS in Africa and the lack of drugs and resources to treat its victims far outstrips any plan the Democrats have offered to fight it; he adopted the orphans of this terrible scourge into the American agenda in a way that will shape the world's efforts against AIDS for another century. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
IN DEFENSE OF MARTHA STEWART, SORT OF
Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Today Martha Stewart said she was perplexed to learn so many took delight in her misfortunes. I admit, I hung my head in shame. [MORE]

Market Mover
DON'T BELIEVE THOSE OBITS FOR U.S. STOCK MARKETS
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., Jan. 28, 2003 -- Don't believe all the nay-sayers who have counted out U.S. equity markets for the next few years. [MORE]

The Media
U.S., JAPAN TRAVEL ADVISORIES RAISE FEARS OF IMMINENT U.S INVASION
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 25, 2003 -- A rare global travel advisory from the U.S. State Dept. to American citizens abroad and a similar advisory from the Japanese government allegedly warning their citizens to leave Iraq by next Wednesday has tripped alarms around the world, with some Websites predicting that the State of the Union address by President George W. Bush on Tuesday night will signal the start of a U.S. invasion of Iraq. [MORE]

Caring
WOMEN TURN TO WOMEN FOR 'COMPASSIONATE CAPITALISM'
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- It is no secret that current economic conditions have made the single-income family one of many dwindling species in 21st Century. Much has been written about the impact of this massive shift, especially on children as women have migrated from home to workplace, but the cultural price this change has exacted from our elders is just beginning to become clear. [MORE]

An AR Special Report
The Fight for Affirmative Action

An AR Special Report
IN PURSUIT OF HISTORY'S LESSONS: AFFIRMATIVE ACTION THE SECOND TIME AROUND

by Terrence Roberts

LOS ANGELES -- In 1997, the City of Little Rock hosted a commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the integration of Central High School. Many of the locals voiced discontent and suggested it was inappropriate to revisit a chaotic period in our nation's history in which, as one of the nine students who integrated Central High, I had played a memorable part. [MORE]

An AR Special Report
On Native Ground: WHY ARE WE STILL ARGUING ABOUT AFFIRMATIVE ACTION?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I was surprised to see that President Bush would take time out from the "war on terror" to denounce affirmative action. I was even more surprised that President Bush and his handlers picked Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday to launch his attack. [MORE]

New Media
QUALCOMM FUMBLES AT 'SUPER TECHNOLOGY BOWL'
by Joe Shea

TORREY PINES, Calif., Jan. 23, 2002 -- On the eve of the Super Bowl at Qualcomm Stadium, here along the lush green links of the Torrey Pines Golf Club in the faux Greene & Greene grand luxe of The Lodge at Torrey Pines, Qualcomm founder and CEO Dr. Irwin Jacobs rolled out his executive front line for a bank of high-tech reporters who mostly asked questions replete with a bewildering array of the abbreviations that define the ailing wireless industry, in which Qualcomm, with its chips in 135 million cell phones, is the dominant player. On Thursday, though, Qualcomm fumbled. [MORE]

Make My Day
YOU KNOW, IT'S JUST ... 'IT'
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Ryan: Welcome back to another episode of American Idol, where lots of pop superstar wannabes show their stuff to our panel of judges, Paula Abdul, Randy Jackson, and Simon "Scowl" Cowell. [MORE]

Momentum: FAST FOOD FASCISM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- McDonald's is under attack these days, but for all the wrong reasons. Yes, the fast food industry sells unhealthy food. Yes, it induces people to overeat for profit. Yes, ranchers cut down rain forests to supply it with cattle. Yes, that reduces the world's oxygen supply. But the real crime of McDonald's - supposedly the shinning symbol of American capitalism - is that it is truly and deeply anti-American. [MORE]

Media Beat MEMO: WHEN WAR IS A RUSH
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- To: Washington's most powerful people. [MORE]

An AR Special Report
The Language of War

AR Special Report
Ink Soup: O, SELL ME A HOME

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- How the Pentagon ever managed to be tagged with such a neutral, geometric name beats me. When I was in the tenth grade, it did not even exist. I was in college before it was finished, and by then I knew enough Greek to understand that it meant "five angles." [MORE]

AR Special Report
ORWELL'S VISION IS STILL ALIVE IN 2003
by Doug Lasken

LOS ANGELES -- Animal Farm, George Orwell's nightmare vision of totalitarianism, became a best seller after World War II when the Cold War began. It has been taught in middle and high schools ever since as an allegory of the Russian Revolution, serving nicely to vilify our erstwhile nemesis, the Soviet Union. [MORE]

Market Mover
BAR MITZVAHS AND EGG ROLLS BESIDE THE PANAMA CANAL
by Mark Scheinbaum

PANAMA CITY, Panama -- Lung Fung is the model for the multicultural globalized world. Or maybe Beirut? Or Maybe Casablanca? [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
NOBODY EVER DIED FROM QUITTING
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, GA. -- Don't get me wrong. I do hate the tobacco industry and it was this hatred that fueled my decision to quit smoking in the late '70s, after 30 years of never leaving home without my only true "friend." Cigarettes got me through thick and thin and except for the times I thought I'd be richer by not smoking, the notion of quitting was never quite sincere. [MORE]

The American Reporter
Solemnly Honors the Memory of
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
"His Was the American Triumph"

Commentary
JOHN HENRY'S FOR SAPS - GIVE ME MOTHER JONES!

by Jimmy Montague

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa -- In observance of Labor Day last year, National Public Radio aired a story about folk hero John Henry. It was a poor choice. I'm here to tell you why. [MORE]

Caring
WHO WILL BE THERE WHEN WE ARE CHILDREN AGAIN?
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I have always felt that caregivers are the most important people in senior care - not the nurses, not the doctors, but the people who actually give the hands-on care, day in and day out. [MORE]

Reporting: Politics
SECRECY SURROUNDS A USE BROTHER'S ROLE IN 9/11 SECURITY
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON, Jan 19, 2003 -- A company that provided security at New York City's World Trade Center, Dulles International Airport in Washington, D.C., and to United Airlines between 1995 and 2001, was backed by a private Kuwaiti-American investment firm with ties to a brother of President Bush and the Bush family, according to records obtained by the American Reporter. [MORE]

The Media
ROB-a-CO? ROB-a-BANK? THE ULTIMATE CONFLICT OF INTEREST
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- "Does the Voice go around saying it's owned by Weiss, Peck & Greer?" [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
INDONESIAN MU.S.LIMS HEAR A PLEA FOR PEACE
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA -– A leading Muslim scholar from the Sudan has injected some high-octane political thinking into the furious debate going on here over the possible imposition of Islamic law, or sharia, saying that the concept is incompatible with democracy and the principles of modern statehood. [MORE]

Brasch Words
HOW FAR WILL USE PUSH THE COURTS?
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa., Jan. 17, 2003 -- The Supreme Court received advice from constitutional scholar, civil rights analyst, national educator and President George W. Bush. Yes, that President Bush. [MORE]

On Native Ground
'CORPORATE CREEP' IS CATCHING UP TO NEWSPAPERS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I've long read newspapers back to front, starting with the sports section. Lately, it's the only part of the newspaper I can stand to read. That's because the front of the newspaper is full of lies and B.S. The sports section is not. [MORE]

Media Beat
MIXED MESSAGES CALL FOR HEALTHY SKEPTICISM
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- A special issue of Time, the nation's biggest newsmagazine, was filled with health information in mid-January, offering plenty of encouragement under the rubric of medical science with an ethereal twist: "How Your Mind Can Heal Your Body." [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT DOES 'DINOSAUR' SMELL LIKE?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- It was bound to happen someday. In the 1950s, we were given 3-D glasses to make movies "come to life." In the '80s and '90s, it was Surround Sound that put us "in the middle of the action." And in the 21st Century, odor is the Next Big Thing that will make entertainment and education more realistic. [MORE]

The Media
REPORT: NEW HOLLYWOOD SCANDAL BREWING AS STUDIOS CHARGE 'EXTORTION' BY EX-CITY COUNCIL MEMBERS
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 15, 2003 -- A forthcoming report by Los Angeles Times staff writers Anita Busch and Steve Barry will reveal a Tinseltown scandal involving at least two former members of the Los Angeles City Council who reportedly shut down films until studios made contributions or bought traffic equipment as a gift to the city, The American Reporter has learned. Both former council members acknowledged speaking with at least one of the two reporters in recent days and months. [MORE]

Momentum
ANNE DRINKARD-MOSS: SINGING FOR THE LORD
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A murmur ran through the choir when the bus pulled into Brattleboro, Vt. "Everybody's white here. What're we going to do?" Then someone said, "We're going to sing to the Lord," and that's exactly what they did. [MORE]

Caring
WHO WILL BE THERE WHEN WE BECOME CHILDREN AGAIN?
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I have always felt that caregivers are the most important people in senior care - not the nurses, not the doctors, but the people who actually give the hands-on care, day in and day out. [MORE]

Ink Soup: UH-OH
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -– Okay, I admit it: I'm afraid. I know: Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once, and so on... . [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WHEN KNOWLEDGE IS NO LONGER POWER
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It's not as if I were born yesterday; I've been around through every technical innovation since the dial telephone. Since then, I've always had the ability to dial a number and reach my party any place in the world. If my telephone were not functioning for some reason or other, I could use a neighbor's, a service station's, a public phone booth, and be as aware of the system as I was at home. [MORE]

On Native Ground
BEST ECONOMIC STIMULU.S. PLAN? NO WAR WITH IRAQ
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President Bush thinks he can rouse the stagnant U.S. economy by eliminating federal taxes on stock dividends. [MORE]

Make My Day
I'LL HAVE WHAT SHE'S HAVING
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I've sometimes considered being a restaurant critic, but except for the restaurant that delivers shish kebabs William Tell style, there aren't many I don't like. [MORE]

New Media
IT FILMS, FILES, AND FLOPS: THE P-800 IS CONVERGENCE GONE WILD
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Jan. 10, 2003 -- The venerable Hollywood Palace rocked tonight to DJs and a screaming hot band called The Used as a crowd of 500 "industry" types listened and ate sushi as the guests of Sony Ericsson, a joint venture of two giant electronics engineering firms who are trying to build some buzz for an amazing new product - a phone that has to be the ultimate destination of "convergence," a word that still sends some geeks into spasms. [MORE]

Market Mover
EARTH TO USE: IT'S CAPITAL GAINS, NOT DIVIDENDS
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- President Bush's proposal to cut or eliminate taxation on common stock dividends is a positive move toward overall tax reform. Yet, it pales in comparison for the need for a genuine, significant reduction - or elimination - of the tax on capital gains. [MORE]

Momentum
WORDS CAN HARM, WORDS CAN KILL
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- News that the American Dialect Society named "weapons of mass destruction" as its "word of the year" came not a moment too soon. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
AN EASY RIDE TO A RUDE AWAKENING
Constance Daley

PHOENIX, Ariz. -- On Dec. 20, the feature on National Public Radio's Weekend Edition "All Things Considered" was called a Race Roundtable. NPR brought together in their studios a relatively small group of people from the Historical Society of Washington, D.C., to discuss former Senate Majority Leader Lott's remarks and to ask where America goes from here. Historically, the nation's capital has been the site of race controversy from the beginning - and still is today. [MORE]

Caring
SURVIVING IN THE ANZa-BORREGO
By Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- The thing about rural nursing is that you never know where the road will take you. It could lead to an old shack without electricity or a mobile home on a reservation, or it could lead to a mansion and everything in-between. [MORE]

Odds & Evens
THE PLAYOFFS: LETTING YOU KNOW WHAT WON'T HAPPEN
by Ed Odeven

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. -- To put a new twist on the obligatory annual prediction columns, this piece is devoted today to things that will not happen in the world of sports in 2003. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE REAL 'LUCKY DUCKIES'
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's hard to say what's more absurd - that The Wall Street Journal's editorial page would call someone who earns under $12,000 a year a "lucky ducky," or that the Journal would use the phrase "lucky duckies" in an editorial. [MORE]

Media Beat: ANNOUNCING THE P.U.-LITZER PRIZES FOR 2002
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- For more than a decade now, the P.U.-litzer Prizes have gone to some of America's stinkiest media performances each year. The competition was fierce as ever in 2002. Many journalistic pieces of work deserved recognition. Only a few could be chosen. [MORE]

Make My Day
STOP LOOKING AT ME!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Say what you will about them, the Chicago Cubs have always been a perennial baseball favorite. Maybe it's because they haven't won the World Series since 1908. Maybe it's because whenever anyone says "tradition," they point to the Cubs. Maybe it's because everyone loves an underdog, and the Cubs are about as underdoggy as you're going to get. [MORE]

Ink Soup: UNBLOTTED
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- For a while after the 1914-18 war certain American writers experimented with what they called automatic writing. You can understand why. People do get fed up with the hard work of trying words one way, crossing them out, trying them another, crossing that...but you get the point. [MORE]

Monentum: MY PERFECT DIVORCE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Many people get a new family through marriage; I got one through a divorce. [MORE]

Happy New Year, Everyone!

On Native Ground
THE WAR RACKET LIVES ON

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "The capitalists are so hungry for profits that they will sell us the rope to hang them with." [MORE]

Odd & Evens
THE PLAYOFF POSSIBILITIES ARE STAGGERING
by Ed Odeven

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz., Dec. 27, 2002 -- When the National Football League's 2002 began, people expected this to be a competitive season. After all, this era of free agency and the salary cap essentially eliminated the threat of long-term dynasties. [MORE]

Market Mover
MAYBE FRIST FORTUNE CAN RUB OFF ON THE NATION
by Mark Scheinbaum

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Dec. 28, 2002) -- Senate majority leader-designate Dr. Bill Frist (R-Tenn)'s seems to have led a charmed life. This week his 19-year-old son, a freshman at Princeton, walked away from a small plane wreck near here with only minor injuries - a holiday blessing to be sure. [MORE]

Media Beat: MEDIA YEAR 2002, R.I.P.
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- It's impossible to adequately sum up any year, and 2002 is probably more difficult than most to grasp. Bursts of militaristic fervor bracketed the 12 months, which began in the terrible aftermath of 9/11 with the United States waging a fierce war in Afghanistan. Now, an even larger war against Iraq seems about to begin. [MORE]

First Person
ON THE NUCLEAR BRINK
by Joe Shea

During a late 1960's Tet offensive, my father served his country as a Single Integrated Operations Plan (SIOP) officer and was responsible for writing nuclear battle plans from inside his locked and guarded office at a remote Air Force base in northern Japan. While North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops were overrunning U.S. bases in South Vietnam, the North Koreans apparently saw an opportune moment to threaten to invade South Korea, and so they deployed hundreds of thousands of troops to the border. [MORE]

The Pooh Papers
Exclusive: HU.S.BAND OF POOH HEIRESS COULD BLOCK SLESINGER-DISNEY SETTLEMENT
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 26, 2002 -- The estranged husband of Beverly Hills Winnie the Pooh heiress Patricia Slesinger told The American Reporter today he has considered blocking a proposed $200 million settlement offered last week by the Walt Disney Co. in her long-running, billion-dollar royalty suit. That could force the complex case to trial early next year. [MORE]

Momentum
THE BEST? OF EVERYTHING
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Bob Dylan always said "Don't look back," but I have to; it's my job. [MORE]

An American Reporter Milestone
Vol. 8, No. 2000
"The World's First Internet Daily Newspaper"

AR 2000 Editorial
A SEAT TO SEE THE WORLD

by Joe Shea

Millions of words have flown from my fingertips since April 10, 1995, when the first edition of The American Reporter was published from this very seat. Owing to the miracle of the Internet, I have watched the entire world unfold before me in a cascading torrent of wars, diseases, deaths, disasters and danger; the world has turned upside down, and my hair has turned from brown to gray as I wrote and edited these streaming pages for an unseen audience seated at computers on six continents and in every country on Earth. [MORE]

The AR 2000 Essay
THE NEW CENSORSHIP: WHAT DO INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY OWNERS WANT?
by Andy Oram

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Researchers around the world were stunned. A promising young graduate student, Dmitri Sklyarov, came to the United States to deliver his insights about weaknesses in a commercial product to a well-known computing conference. A few hours after his presentation, he was in jail. [MORE]

An AR 2000 Essay
AS AMERICA TURNS: THE DOMESTIC AXIS OF EVIL
by Ron Kenner

HOLLYWOOD, Calif. Dec. 20, 2002 -- Patriotism is great. Opposing terrorism is essential. Compassion for terrorist victims is unquestionably called for. Yet we need a patriotism that also demonstrates serious concern for millions of other victims - a patriotism that confronts the culprits of the generally ignored, curiously unmentionable, domestic Axis of Evil: Access, Excess, and Obsess. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WHAT REAL 'HOMELAND SECURITY' COULD BE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - "Homeland security," a phrase that came into vogue after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, has become a concept that seems to have more to do with suppressing internal dissent than in actually making the U.S. less vulnerable to terrorism. [MORE]

Media Beat
SEAN PENN IN BAGHDAD: IMAGE GIVES WAY TO SUBSTANCE
by Norman Solomon

BAGHDAD -- When they realized that Sean Penn had arrived in Baghdad unannounced, the Western journalists in the city were taken aback. But they ultimately seemed more surprised by the great distance between media images and the man they actually met. [MORE]

Brasch Words
A LOTT OF QUESTIONS
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- It was just an off-the-cuff comment. A throw-away line, actually. Just something to honor retiring Sen. Strom Thurmond at his 100th birthday bash. [MORE]

Make My Day
'CAUSE IT'S 1-2-3 CAVITIES, YOU'RE OUT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- When companies face high taxes and financial strain, good executives will try anything they can think of to fight their way out of a bad situation. They'll make salary cuts, slash travel and advertising budgets, and even cut employee benefits. [MORE]

Momentum
A DIFFERENT KIND OF TERROR
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Someone asked the other day if I was thinking of selling my house. [MORE]

Market Mover
EXCITING WAL-MART AND McDONALD'S GAMBITS
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, FL. -- Wal-Mart Stores (WMT), the world's largest retailer, and McDonald's (MCD), the biggest restaurant chain, have stirred Wall Street in recent weeks. Both have made bold headlines, and it might be surprising to some investors, that both provide fascinating and potentially windfall opportunities. [MORE]

Ink Soup
RHYMES WITH DRASTIC
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Among the royal families there seem to have been at least seven worthies named Philip the Adjective: Philip the Fair, Philip the Good, Philip the Tall, Philip the Handsome, and (twice!) Philip the Bold. (Shouldn't one have been the Bolder? Or might that have sounded too much like "boulder" and suggested unflattering things about his intelligence?) [MORE]

Caring
THE SISTERS OF MERCY ARE STILL WITH U.S.
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I haven't seen them in years but I came across a picture of the Sisters Servants of Mary today on the Internet. They are an order of Catholic nuns, mostly from Latin countries. Beautiful women with dark skin and eyes dressed in white habits. A semi-contemplative order, their vocation besides prayer is to care for the sick and elderly. [MORE]

Editorial
GOODBY, MR. GORE; HELLO, SEN. KERRY
by Joe Shea

The decision by former Vice President Al Gore not to run for president in 2004 opens wide the gate for the nomination by Democrats of U.S. Sen. John F. Kerry, and that is a development we heartily approve. John Kerry represents a new and well-tested generation of American leaders who demand an accounting of our nation's role in world affairs and command our respect as guardians of our personal and political freedoms. [MORE]

On Native Ground
NORTH KOREA A GREATER THREAT THAN IRAQ
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The inconsistencies in President Bush's "war on terror" grow by the day, with one of the biggest being the difference in treatment between two members of the much-vaunted "axis of evil," Iraq and North Korea. [MORE]

Media Beat
DECODING SOME TOP BUZZ WORDS OF 2002
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- How words are used can be crucial to understanding and misunderstanding the world around us. The media lexicon is saturated with certain buzz phrases. They're popular -- but what do they mean? [MORE]

Momentum
BEFORE THE FALL
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Rather than despair as busy President Bush and his cohorts lead the nation into an unnecessary and potentially devastating war, trash the environment, loot the treasury to line their own and their supporters' pockets, spy on and arrest innocent citizens, attempt to destroy most of the Bill of Rights, and at the same time leave us more vulnerable to terrorist attacks than ever before, it is hopeful to remember that, in the long run, absolute power corrupts absolutely. [MORE]

WHAT WALL STREET NEEDS FROM SANTA
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., Dec. 11, 2002 -- Santa George looked down from his sleigh and decided that Wall Street needed a new ribbon-wrapped Treasury Secretary, SEC Chairman, and Chief Economic Advisor. [MORE]

Ink Soup
DID YOU SAY SOMETHING?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash -- You are reading this on the second Sunday in Advent. Last Sunday, as if to mark the onset of Advent, I had what seems to have been an aural hallucination. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
'CITY SIDEWALKS, BU.S.Y SIDEWALKS...'
by Constance Daley

NEW YORK, N.Y. -- "City sidewalks, busy sidewalks, dressed in holiday fare ... " in reality begins and ends with lighted trees and store windows in rich displays of Christmas past, present and future. The sidewalks themselves, now, they're another story. [MORE]

Editorial
THE RICH ARE DIFFERENT
by Joe Shea

I often wonder at the good fortune that has brought so many rare and interesting people into my life, as I do today recalling brief encounters with Fr. Phil Berrigan and Roone Arledge, two men who also probably admired each other from a careful distance. [MORE]

Reporting: India
BODY OF KIDNAPPED INDIAN OFFICIAL FOUND
by Aman Singh

NEW DELHI, Dec. 8, 2002 -- The president of a major political party and chief minister of the Indian state of Karnataka was found dead today, 106 days after he was kidnapped by a dreaded bandit and sandalwood smuggler known as Veerapan. [MORE]

Caring
OF SNOWFLAKES AND BRIDGES
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- How very much like childhood is old age, when the need for security is paramount. With children this need is recognized and understood; with our elders, generally, it is not - and that is the source of much suffering for older Americans. [MORE]

+In Memoriam +
Fr. Phil Berrigan
A Fighter for Peace

On Native Ground
LIBERALS NEED THEIR OWN 'MEDIA MACHINE'

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A few days after the Republican Party's victory in the midterm elections, Fox News Channel's Brit Hume was on the "Imus in the Morning" radio show crowing about how Fox News was responsible for it. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
MATT DAMON, FRANK GORSHIN AND THE NEW YORK ZONE
by Constance Daley

NEW YORK, N.Y. -- If I were to write an article a week in, or about, New York City, I wouldn't touch the same corner twice. This week, I'm writing one article in and about New York City and I'll touch upon many corners. [MORE]

+ In Memoriam +
Roone Arledge
The King of Sports
July 8, 1931 - December 5, 2002

Media Beat
HOW MEDIA SPINS A WAR WITHOUT DEATH

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- A dozen years after the Gulf War, public perceptions of it are now very helpful to the White House. That's part of a timeworn pattern. Illusions about previous wars make the next one seem acceptable. As George Orwell observed: "Who controls the past controls the future; who controls the present controls the past." [MORE]

Make My Day
HOW ABOUT 'ALASKA: STAY FOR THE WINTER'?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Think real hard. Does your city or state have a slogan? [MORE]

Exclusive
L.A.P.D.'S CHIEF BRATTON SAYS HE BACKS MEDICAL MARIJUANA
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 4, 2002 -- In a brief exclusive interview with The American Reporter tonight, new Los Angeles Police Chief William Bratton became the latest nationally-known law enforcement official to back the use of medical marijuana. [MORE]

The Pooh Papers
POOH HEIRESS WON'T PAY MAID'S CLAIM
American Reporter Staff

HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 4, 2002 -- A Beverly Hill heiress to Winnie the Pooh riches charged yesterday she is being "manipulated" and won't pay the remainder of a claim against her for firing Mireya Shea, the wife of American Reporter Editor-in-Chief Joe Shea. [MORE]

Exclusive
CLERICS ISSUE DEATH SENTENCE AGAINST INDONESIAN SCHOLAR
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, Dec. 3, 2002 -- In a move that might complicate Indonesia's anti-terrorism campaign, a group of local Muslim clerics, or ulemas, issued a fatwa, or death sentence, Monday against Muslim scholar Ulil Abshar-Abdalla, saying that they have condemned him to die for blasphemy. The scholar spoke to the American Reporter by telephone today. [MORE]

Momentum
THE ICE WALKER
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When I teach freelance writing, I start by putting these facts on the blackboard. According to a 1995 National Writers Union study, the median annual income of freelance writers is between $6,000 and $10,000. (In 1979, it was $4,775, so you can see how far we're come.) Only 15 percent of us earn over $30,000 a year. Our average hourly wage is $5.33. Only one of us is Stephen King. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE FOG ALSO RISES
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The next best title for a personal column like this was Mrs. Roosevelt's "My Day." There is a kind of patrician insouciance about supposing that readers might like to know what kind of day you had, but then, if you were Mrs. FDR, of course they did. [MORE]

Market Mover
'PLAIN JANE' FUNDS MAY BE BEST MARKET BET
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, FLA., Dec. 3, 2002 -- When it comes to long-term mutual fund investing, perhaps it's best for most investors not to try to "reinvent the wheel." [MORE]

Caring
SEEKING THE KINGDOM - THE UNAUTHORIZED VERSION
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- "Drive between the chicken sheds and the goat ranch, on that road in-between the two, and follow it for about a mile. Go to the right when the road splits, down around the hill and I'm off to the bottom." [MORE]

On Native Ground
CANADA IS NEWEST MEMBER OF U.S. ENEMIES LIST
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - The U.S. tends to take Canada for granted, at least until Canada acts in a way that reminds Americans that our northern neighbor is not the 51st state. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: PRODUCING NEW YORK
by Constance Daley

NEW YORK, N.Y. -- A three-day weekend comprising a 12-hour Saturday, ful= l Sunday and a 12-hour Monday might appear to offer little time to enjoy ev= erything planned for a weekend in New York. Not so. Not if you cram-jam 60 = fully-rounded seconds into every minute of every hour. For the uninitiated= , that time distinction is called a New York minute. The draw was a high = school reunion, a chance to reconnect or establish for the first time, frie= ndships with those living parallel lives to our own 'way back when. Early = arrival in the city meant we would have time, precious time, each moment on= e of Kipling's unforgiving minutes -- certainly not to be squandered. [MORE]

Ink Soup: THE HA-HA CURE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- At the Harborview Medical Center here there is a Laugh= ing Club. Nurses, receptionists, orderlies, interns. They meet once a day= [MORE]

An AR Analysis MOUNTAIN OF PROBLEMS AWAITS MEGAWATI
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA -- New Indonesian President Megawati Sukarnoputri is arguably th= e most popular leader in Indonesia, having fervent supporters in all walks = of life, from movie stars to street vendors, from Muslim clerics to Christi= an activists in this vast archipelago of 220 million people. [MORE]

IN PEACEFUL SHIFT, INDONESIA GETS A NEW PRESIDENT
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, July 23, 2001 -- In a fast moving and dramatic political strugg= le that involved many political parties, the military, the police, and the = media, Indonesia's national assembly fired President Abdurrahman Wahid and = today installed his deputy Megawati Sukarnoputri as president. "The Peopl= e's Consultative Assembly hereby dismisses Mr. Abdurrahman Wahid as the pre= sident of the Republic of Indonesia prior to the end of his term as he has = been proven breaching the guidelines of the state," said Amien Rais, the sp= eaker of the assembly, on Monday afternoon. Megawati made a short speech = after the swearing-in ceremony, "To start this job, I am calling on all par= ties to accept this decision, with an open heart. It is my belief that ther= e is no single big group that can lead the country out of the crisis. So I = expect cooperation from all parties." [MORE]

WAHID GOVERNMENT NEARS COLLAPSE IN INDONESIA
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, July 23, 2001 -- Indonesia's President Abdurrahman Wahid today = ordered the dissolution of parliament, "froze" the main opposition party Go= lkar and called for elections a year from now, but his generals and Jakarta= [MORE]

Native Ground: LET'S GET BIG MONEY OUT OF POLITICS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- No one does absurdity quite like Congress. Whatother = conclusion can one come to after watching them argue over the"Patients Bill= [MORE]

Editorial: HOW MUCH SEX DOES AMERICA WANT?
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- A cartoon in the news section of the LA Weekly's July 19 ed= ition shows a tiny fellow of indeterminate age, maybe 15 or so, masturbatin= g in one panel as he watches tv, and then angrily stomping on his emission = in the next. [MORE]

Media Beat: KATHARINE GRAHAM'S FIRST DRAFT
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Some time before he committed suicide 38 years ago, lea= ving the Washington Post Co. in the hands of his widow Katharine, pu= blisher Philip Graham described journalism as "the first draft of history." [MORE]

Make My Day: LORD OF THE FISH
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Friday, July 6 -- We made it! After a 20-h= our drive from Indiana, we made it to Red Lake, Ontario (that's in Canada) = for our annual fly-in fishing trip. Each summer, we spend a week up in Nort= hwest Ontario, eating, fishing, smoking cigars, telling jokes, andenjoying = the scenery and moderate weather, and maybe drinking a beer ortwo. Between = us. All week long. I swear. [MORE]

WE BUILT THIS CITY: 'REDEVELOPMENT' FOR AGING ROCKERS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Believe it or not, this very evening the immortal wor= ds, "Hey hey we're the Monkees," will ring out across a stage somewhere. I= t makes you wonder, doesn't it, how these aging rock stars areholding up. R= ingo's out on tour, and Journey, and Ozzy, of course, has thelargest-grossi= ng concert tour of the summer. Roxy Music, Huey Lewis andthe News and Chic= ago are out there. Bob Dylan is always out there. Far be it from me to s= neer at aging rock stars doing what can onlybe called cover versions of the= ir original hits. Musicians don't have shelflives. But, I can hear you sa= y, rock is the music of youth and rebellion. Nonsense. Rock is the music = of television commercials, glossymagazines, three-record deals, MTV, Wal-Ma= rt lyric censorship and musiccompanies as part of giant entertainment monop= olies. [MORE]

Imk Soup: WATCH FOR WIND
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--What is it about me? Even on the road, thousands ofmile= s from my listing in the phone book, I attract wrong numbers. [MORE]

Momentum: N.Y. TIMES AS 'NEWSPAPER OF PART OF THE RECORD'
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision for Jonathan Tasini of the National Writers Union (I am a member) over The New York Times, the 1976 U.S. Copyright Law was upheld, freelance writers' rights were reasserted, and publishers and data collectors were told to stop stealing their work. [MORE]

Media Beat: MEDIA MANIA OVER CONDIT SCANDAL GOES OVER THE TOP
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Like many other news items that have ballooned to huge nat= ional proportions in recent years, the story that made Gary Condit infamous= [MORE]

Make My Day: ATTACK OF THE DISNEY SIDEKICKS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- The following is from a future episode of the Cha= rlie Rose Show, which can be seen on your local public television station. [MORE]

Cindy Hasz: THE YATES TRAGEDY REVEALS EVILS OF PASSIVITY
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- It's been over two weeks now since Andrea Yates killed= [MORE]

MAOIST INSURGENTS KILL 41 POLICEMEN IN NEPAL
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, July 7, 2001 -- Underground Maoist rebels in thisland-locked = and troubled Kingdom killed at least 41 policemen last nightin three separa= te incidents in western Nepal. It was the most deadlyattack by Maoists sin= ce the Royal Palace massacre, in which 10 peopleincluding the King, Queen, = Crown Prince, and members of the royal familywere killed by the former Crow= n Prince. [MORE]

On Native Ground: THE QUARTERLIFE CRISIS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- You've heard of midlife crisis, that point when you h= it 50 and generally freak out. Now, in this accelerated age we are living i= n, there's a new malady: The quarterlife crisis. [MORE]

An AR Special Report
PORN IN THE AMERICAN MAINSTREAM: A REAL-LIFE=
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, July 6, 2001 -- Are you pretty good at putting two and two to= gether? [MORE]

A.R. Special Report:
TOURISM TO BEAUTIFUL WALES HURT BY FMD EPID=
by Allan R. Andrews

FISHGUARD, Pembrokeshire, Wales -- Foot-and-mouth disease, which has mad= e eating beef in Britain a rare event, is subtly devastating the tourist tr= ade in this paradise of nature and Celtic history. [MORE]

Media Beat: ALL-STARS TAKE THE FIELD
by Normon Solomon

WASHINGTON -- A few summers ago, baseball's All-Star Game inspired me to= [MORE]

Momentum: LOVE LETTER TO A FLEA MARKET
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Sunny Sunday mornings in summer mean only one thing t= o me -- the flea market is open. I'm out of bed and in my car as the sun is= [MORE]

Happy Birthday, America!

Editorial: LO=

by Joe Shea

As we celebrate America's birthday today, I can't resist the observation= [MORE]

Market Mover: THIS WAL-MART SUPERSTORE IS A TRASHY MESS
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOYNTON BEACH, Fla. -- The brutally honest columnist giveth, and sometim= es he taketh away. Sorry, Wal-Mart. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: LIFE'S A BEACH
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When I first saw a T-shirt emblazoned "L= ife's a Beach," I took it the wearer was just back from vacationing at a Cl= ub Med resort with sea, sand and casinos. And, I took the words to mean: "= That's the life, to be on a beach." [MORE]

An A.R. Essay: BOOMING IN AMERICA
by Lory Medina

LONG BEACH, Calif. -- I've just relocated to California, and I'm activel= y watching things. [MORE]

WITH APOLOGIES TO DYLAN, ORWELL FROM THE GRAVE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- I dreamed I saw George Orwell last night. Alive as you or = me. [MORE]

Momentum: ERASING 'THE FIRST DRAFT OF HISTORY'
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Remember the spoiled kid who whined that he'd take hi= s toys and go home if you didn't play the game his way? That's the way = The New York Times has been behaving since June 25, when the U.S. Supre= me Court ruled against the paper and in favor of freelancers' rights. It is= n't a pretty sight. [MORE]

American Essay: EX-PROSECUTOR WARNS AGAINST NEW WAR CRIMES LAW
by Benjamin B. Ferencz

NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y. -- A misguided trap is being set by right-wingconserv= atives. It threatens our national security interests and endangersour milit= ary personnel. [MORE]

Ink Soup: GOING HOME
by Clarence Brown

ON THE ROAD, U.S.A. -- I do not feel well in my soul. This protracted e= ve of the drive across the country, from Seattle to the coast of South Caro= lina, has begun to weigh on me. I'd feel better, I think, if I got up one m= orning and decided to drive to DeBordieu and -- left. Pillaging and lootin= g the locals for my needs along the way. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: CARROLL O'CONNOR WAS PART OF THE FAMILY
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- I didn't know him and yet I knew him so w= ell. Carroll O'Connor, born in the Bronx as my husband was -- raised in Qu= eens as I was -- pursued a career we would follow for just those reasons. = [MORE]

7.9 QUAKE KILLS AT LEAST 47, INJURES HUNDREDS IN PERU
by Joe Shea

AREQUIPA, Peru, June 24, 2001 -- One of the most powerful earthquakes ev= er to hit the Western Hemisphere struck the "white city" of Arequipa, Peru,= [MORE]

On Native Ground: EUROPEANS AREN'T ANTI-AMERICAN, JUST ANTI-USE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's been amusing to read how the conservativechatter= ing class has reacted to President Bush's recent trip to Europe. [MORE]

THE FUTURE IS STREAMING
by Joe Shea

LONG BEACH, Calif. -- In 1980, I dreamed that streaming particles of lig= ht came flowing through my room in waves that passed with equal ease throug= h flesh and plaster. Later, as I began to hear about theorized faster-than= -light particles called tachyons, I wrote a short story called "The Eyes of= [MORE]

Ink Soup: VIEW HALLOO!
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- For homebuyers in Seattle a house that is attached to the cit= y water and sewer lines has an undeniable cachet, electricity is a definite= [MORE]

Media Beat: DESIGNS FOR A DIFFERENT MEDIA FUTURE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- What we see is what we get, or so the adage goes. Bu= t when we see the designs of mass media, what do we truly get? That's a tro= ubling question for those who wonder what the constant barrages of media-ge= nerated images are doing to our lives. [MORE]

Make My Day: LEARNING TO LIVE WITH LISTERIA
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Prior to 2001, the only thing people had to worry= [MORE]

Momentum: CENSORING THE INTERNET IN THE NAME OF KIDS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What is the biggest threat to children on the Interne= t? Of the more than 39,000 Netscape users who voted on that question on We= dnesday, 45 percent said the biggest threat by far was sexual predators. Po= rn was considered a bigger threat by 26 percent, hate sites by16 percent, v= iolence by 7 percent, and "other" by 6 percent. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: IN THE EYE OF A FABLE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Cats don't have nine lives and I don't fe= ed stray cats. Those two facts collided last week right after seven inches= [MORE]

'LATE FEE' RIP-OFFS HIT CONSUMERS, COLLEGE KIDS HARD
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- Don't even be a day late with your $12 Pep Boys payment, = if you're a basic user of its charge card -- it will cost you $29. Be cert= ain to get your $5 Macy's payment in on time -- the company charges $25 if = it's late. [MORE]

An AR Special Report
CROWN PRINCE SAID RESPONSIBLE FOR ROYAL MAS=
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, June 17, 2001 -- The great dramatist Shakespeare in <= i>King Richard III writes, "And my large kingdom for a little grave, an= [MORE]

Editorial: THE DEATH AND LIFE OF JOURNALISM
by Joe Shea

"Fatigue makes cowards of us all. It also makes it tough to sound coher= ent," the lettter from an old newspaper pal back East begins. After a long= [MORE]

On Native Ground: USE, GOP PLAY THE TAX CUT SHELL GAME
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So, what are you going to do with your rebate? The = $600 that my wife and I are likely to get from President Bush's tax cuts ar= e enough to pay for the five cords of firewood we burn each year to heat th= e house. It might cover the next brake job I need on my 1997 Geo Metro, may= be with enough over for a set of tires. Or it could pay for replacing the r= otting parts of our back deck. [MORE]

Media Beat: PRAISE FOR PENTAGON PAPERS RINGS HOLLOW
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- When they challenged the power of the White House by= claiming the right to publish the Pentagon Papers, the nation's two most in= fluential newspapers took a laudable stand. During the three decades since = then, praise for their journalistic courage has become a time-honored ritua= l in the media world. [MORE]

Make My Day: WILL YOU GO WITH ME?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Editor's Note: Because of a death in Erik'= s family, we are reprinting an earlier column. [MORE]

Momentum: THOU SHALT NOT KILL
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So, are you "healed" now? Have you found "closure"? Can you get back to your "normal life" now that Timothy McVeigh no longer walks (or sits in a jail cell) among us? Doesn't it feel good to= punish? Isn't revenge great? [MORE]

Ink Soup: 2 MP'S, ASAP
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Dr. Soup wishes to make two modest proposals to improv= e the quality of life. Historical note: The term modest proposal (MP to t= he trade) willrecall to literate readers the title of Jonathan Swift's essa= y suggestingthat hunger in his native Ireland be relieved by eating superfl= uouschildren. Note for the irony-challenged: He didn't mean it.[MORE]

O O O

Hominy & Hash
SERENDIPITY IN CYBERSPACE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This weekend I discovered that one man's common knowledge is often another man's quest - in a letter from a stranger. Well, let me put it here: [MORE]

An AR Exclusive: INDONESIA ARRESTS LEFT-LEANING SCHOLARS
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, June 12, 2001 1:25am (PDT) -- On a hot and humid afternoon last Friday, June 8, Giles Ji Ungpakorn sat inside a conference room and listened to a Japanese scholar speaking about the economic crisis and macroeconomic policies in Japan. A big, green rectangular table with some 80 people around it dominated the meeting room at a well-known resort in suburban Jakarta. [MORE]

An American Reporter Special Report
"Tim McVeigh's Day of Reckoning"

McVEIGH STAYS SILENT TO THE END

by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, June 11, 2001 -- Timothy McVeigh went to his death Monday= [MORE]

Media Beat: IN MEDIALAND, IT WAS TIME TO KILL
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Minutes after a federal judge ruled that the execution of = Timothy McVeigh should proceed on June 11 as scheduled, CNN was airing live= [MORE]

Editorial: UPON THE DEATH OF TIMOTHY McVEIGH
by Joe Shea

As I write this morning, a blind man is speaking to the media in Oklahom= a City after the execution of Timothy McVeigh for the bombing of the Alfred= [MORE]

On Native Ground: WHO'S THE REAL ROGUE NATION?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We are the last remaining superpower. We dominate the= [MORE]

McVEIGH ENDS APPEALS PROCESS, PREPARES TO DIE
by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, June 7, 2001 -- A federal appeals court rejected Timothy = McVeigh's bid for a stay of execution Thursday and the Oklahoma City bomber= [MORE]

Make My Day: MAYBE HE SHOULD HAVE SENT FLOWERS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Leave it to the British. With the exception of a = few soccer hooligans and punk rockers, the British are well-known for their= [MORE]

Momentum: DEATH OF A JAZZMAN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It was December of 1997, I was sitting at a diner, I = was waiting to interview jazz guitar master Attila Zoller, and I was nervou= s. Attila's lifelong dream -- a permanent home for his beloved Vermont Jaz= z Center, was coming true after 27 years. But I also knew that he was dyin= g. I'd seen him only a few months before, at a Sonny Rollins concert (he = played with Rollins in the '50s), and he looked fine -- broad shoulders, bi= g grin, black captain's hat pulled low over his eyes. [MORE]

McVEIGH TRIAL JUDGE LETS EXECUTION DATE STAND
by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, June 6, 2001 -- The judge who heard Timothy McVeigh's bom= bing case said Wednesday it was "shocking" that the FBI had failed to turn = over all evidence to the defendant, but he said there was nothing in thousa= nds of additional pages that were withheld that would keep McVeigh from dyi= ng as scheduled next Monday. [MORE]

HAHN TIDE SWEEPS AWAY HOPE OF LATINO MAYOR FOR L.A.
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, July 6, 2001, 6:00am (PST) -- Many, many months ago, when t= he election that concluded today for Mayor of Los Angeles was still two yea= rs ahead, the smart money and the inside people at City Hall East -- the mo= dern building where city government has waited out a $350 million rehab of = L.A.'s famed City Hall, just across Spring St. -- put their money on tall, = affable City Attorney James Hahn, the scion of a political dynasty that has= [MORE]

Ink Soup: LION REDIVIVU.S.
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Here is the thrilling sequel to a story first publishe= d here in April. But first, a synopsis for new readers: Some little whil= e ago we became tired of finding our cat Huck at the door, barely ambulator= y after losing yet another fight with the local feral cat, a grey Persian w= hom we nicknamed Lion. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: EVERYTHING OLD IS NEW AGAIN
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Not enough of us remember Arthur Godfrey,= [MORE]

On Native Ground: REP. MOAKLEY'S LAST MISSION WAS CLOSING THE=
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- On the first of June, they buried Congressman JoeMoak= ley in his beloved hometown of South Boston. [MORE]

Editorial: MIKE WOO FOR CITY COUNCIL
by Joe Shea

The race for Hollywood's Los Angeles City Council seat has come down to two exceptional young men, former City Councilman Mike Woo and challenger Eric Garcetti, a prominent leader of Amnesty International and the son of former Los Angeles County District Atty. Gil Garcetti. [MORE]

Make My Day: FROM MMD THEATER, IT'S THE BARB AND JENNA SHOW =
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind., June 1, 2001 -- {Editor's Note: In comments = yesterday, the White House press office advised media to "think over very c= arefully" our treatment of what was termed a "private family matter" concer= ning the adventures of First Twins Barbara and Jenna Bush. Having given the= [MORE]

Editorial: VILLARAIGOSA FOR MAYOR OF LOS ANGELES
by Joe Shea

In this city of dreams, none burns brighter than that of AntonioVillarai= gosa. [MORE]

Media Beat: AT COMMENCEMENT, JOURNALISM HAS A HAZY FUTURE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Today, departing from an institution steeped in modernity,= [MORE]

Momentum: THE WIT AND WISDOM OF FRED EAGLESMITH
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If there was anyone left in Nashville with a brain, F= red Eaglesmith would be selling CDs by the millions. [MORE]

Ink Soup: WITH APOLOGIES TO EMILY
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- There are times when I consider Whitman to be the grea= test American poet. But then there are other days, and today is one of them= , when I am absolutely sure that it is Emily Dickinson. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: FOR GRADS, A BITE OF WIT, A TASTE OF WISDOM
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Row after row of graduates, dressed alik= e but not complaining about the dress code, assemble for the last time. Ea= ch waits in joyful -- almost giddy -- anticipation for the commencement cer= emony to get under way. [MORE]

In Solemn Memory
of

Richard Marsh, Paul Roberts and Phil Ruminski
and
All Our Honored Dead

Editorial
I AM NOT A HERO

by Joe Shea

When the time came to fight the Vietnam War and I was called up, I could not allow myself to be sworn into the armed services for the simplest of reasons: I could not kill another human being. [MORE]

On Native Ground: JAMES JEFFORDS AND THE VERMONT TRADITION OF INDEPE=
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Vermont Sen. James Jeffords has long had areputation = for being a low-profile politician who rarely strays from themiddle of the = road on most issues. [MORE]

Media Beat: SIMULATING DEMOCRACY CAN BE A VIRTUAL BREEZE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Few media eyebrows went up when the World Bank recently ca= nceled a global meeting set for Barcelona in late June -- and shifted it to= [MORE]

Make My Day: I ORDER YOU TO BE QUIET
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Regular readers of this column may not realize my= [MORE]

An AR Exclusive: PACHECO MADE ILLEGAL $10,000 LOAN TO PHONE BANK=
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, May 24, 2001 10:21am PDT -- Using campaign funds, Los Angel= es City Councilman Nick Pacheco made an illegal, interest-free, short-term = $10,000 loan with no due date in February 2000 to La Colectiva, the politic= al phone bank operation that later made controversial phone calls attacking= [MORE]

Momentum: HEY, FRAT BOY! MEET THE GROUPIES
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As I was driving on a recent Spring weekend through H= anover, N.H., the home of Dartmouth College, I noticed that several of the = fraternities were having outdoor parties. Crowds of young men and women mi= ngled happily on lawns with paper cups in their hands. [MORE]

Ink Soup: TRIPUNCTUALISM REVISITED
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The dean of Seattle newspaper columnists, Emmett Watso= n, died here last week at the age of 82. Like Herb Caen in San Francisco a= nd Flann O'Brien in Dublin, he was the unelected voice of his city. He wrot= e in the "three dot" format, beloved also by Caen and O'Brien, and not alt= ogether unfamiliar to readers of Ink Soup. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: THE HOME STRETCH
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Our own personal comfort zone isbuilt = more by our associations than by anything we do to create it. [MORE]

On Native Ground: CONSERVATION IS SANE RESPONSE TO ENERGY SHORTAG=
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The first load of our wood supply for next winter arr= ived a few days ago. Our wood guy said he sold nearly 1,000 cords of wood l= ast winter, and could have sold double that if he had it. Because we're lon= g-time customers, he made sure we got our supply ahead of the folks who are= [MORE]

Make My Day: SOMETIMES LIFE JUST AIN'T FAIR, EH?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Earlier this week, I had a chance to spend a few = days in Canada on business in Guelph, Ontario. I had a great time, and deci= ded that Canada is an excellent place to visit. The people are very friendl= y, the scenery is beautiful, and the towns are very clean and pretty safe. = Oh, by the way, Guelph is pronounced "Gwelf," not"Goo-elf," as I found out.= [MORE]

Media Beat: FROM ITALY, HERE COMES 'MEDIA' DEMOCRACY
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Now that Italy's voters have given the job of prime = minister to media magnate Silvio Berlusconi, others may wish to follow his = example on this side of the Atlantic. [MORE]

Opinion: POLYGAMY TRIAL RAISES RIGHTS ISSUES
by Godfrey D. Lehman

SAN FRANCISCO -- Way down at the tag end of the Constitution in Article = VI (the next to last) is a declaration just as clear -- and indisputable --= [MORE]

Momentum: THE UTTERLY DISPOSABLE FEMALE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Here's a riddle for you: What may be the most worthl= ess thing on the planet? The answer: An old woman -- unless it's a young gi= rl. And I'm sorry if you're been offended, but that's the unhappy conclusi= on I've drawn from a number of recent news stories. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: CLOSURE, FOR LACK OF A BETTER WORD
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Whether it's a school shooting, the Oklah= oma bombing, a suicide or a Volkswagen hitting and killing my teenaged son,= [MORE]

Market Mover: FIVE DOWN, ONE TO GO FOR FED?
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., May 15, 2001 -- Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan's latest r= ate cut means it's five down with one to go until economic crunch time. T= o no one's surprise, Greenspan cut rates 50 basis points, a number that had= [MORE]

Analysis: SWEATHSIRT SHROUDS STRANGE CASE OF ROBERT BLAKE
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- The murder of "Baretta" star Robert Blake's wife Bonny Lee = Bakley became infinitely more complicated Monday, when the media learned th= at police recovered a gun believed to be the murder weapon from a Dumpster = just a few yards from the site of the murder on Woodbridge Ave. in Studio C= ity, a block from Vitello's restaurant where the couple dined just before h= er death. The complication, simply stated, is that if Blake owned that gu= n, it may prove him a cold-blooded killer who methodically planned the assa= ssination of a troublesome wife. If not, it frees him forever of the guilt = for her death. And the answer lies neatly wrapped in a sweatshirt that the= [MORE]

Ink Soup: THE TUNA DIALOGUES
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- My cat Huck has now reached, and even exceeded, the ag= e of discretion, and is, like all cats, naturally fond of philosophicaldisc= ussion. Too fond, as will appear below. [MORE]

Commentary: SHOULD A JURY VOTE ITS CONSCIENCE? YES.
by Godfrey D. Lehman

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- The practice of juries bringing in verdicts co= ntrary to the law as interpreted to them in court would be banned if a unan= imous California Supreme Court decision has its way. [MORE]

AS INDONESIA AWAITS HER RISE, MEGAWATI'S RULE IS STUDIED
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, May 14, 2001 -- In late 1996, Megawati Sukarnoputri was a real = loner, although perhaps not by choice. The authoritarian regime of Presiden= t Suharto organized a bogus party congress and supported her opposition ins= ide the Indonesian Democratic Party to topple her from itsleadership. Suh= arto was then a tremendous power here, controlling the military, the bureau= cracy, the media, and the business world to the extent, said an Indonesian = thinker, that "the state was personalized." [MORE]

The American Reporter Wishes
Every Mom A

Happy Mother's=

by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Has it really been 16 years since you passed through t= he great waters and sailed your little slip of a body through my canal and = onto the shore our lives? Skydiver you might as well have been; or small, s= ea-bird laying bruised and winded from sudden impact with this bright and c= razy world. [MORE]

Happy Mother's Day!
Hominy & Hash: MOTHER
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Mother is one word that translates into e= very language, including gutter language. And, whether it precedes an epit= het or follows a prayer, the word carries dignity and reverence. [MORE]

Happy Mother's Day!
Momentum: HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY, MOM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Although the mother-daughter relationship is grounded= [MORE]

REPORTS OF BREAK IN MUMIA CASE NOT BORNE OUT
American Reporter Staff

PHILADELPHIA, May 14, 2001 -- Reports circulating in Philadelphia, San F= rancisco and elsewhere that a major break is imminent in the case against b= lack journalist Abu-Mumia Jamal of Philadelphia, charged with the Dec. 9, 1= 981, murder of city policeman Daniel Faulkner, cannot be confirmed. [MORE]

On Native Ground: DECONSTRUCTING THE KENTUCKY DERBY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Maybe I think this because I love newspapers but it's= [MORE]

McVEIGH EXECUTION POSPONED DUE TO FBI SLIP-UP
by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, May 11, 2001 -- Timothy McVeigh, who had rejected any fur= ther appeals of his death penalty for the federal building bombing, was giv= en a 30-day stay of execution Thursday after the FBI revealed it had withhe= ld some evidence at his trial. [MORE]

FBI SAYS McVEIGH EVIDENCE WITHHELD
by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, May 10, 2001 -- The FBI informed a federal judge and Timo= thy McVeigh's defense attorneys Thursday it had found a quantity of evidenc= e in the Oklahoma City federal building bombing case that had never been re= vealed to McVeigh's lawyers. [MORE]

Make My Day: I'LL SELL YOU A BIG HOLE IN ARIZONA
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- How much does a hole in the ground cost? G= enerally they're free. When I was about nine years old, FreddieWalker, Mick= ey and Bobby Workman and I spent a week that summer digginga hole in Mickey= [MORE]

Media Beat EXECUTING McVEIGH: THE MEDIA RITES OF RETRIBUTION
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON, May 10, 2001 -- For half a century, we've been watching ritu= als of retribution. Countless entertainment shows on TV have presented cert= ain vengeance as dramatic justice. In time for the last commercial, the des= ignated bad guys got what was coming to them. [MORE]

Commentary: THE COMING WAR OVER TAIWAN
by Howard Bloom

NEW YORK, May 10, 2001 -- Governments on the verge of military action ha= ve traditionally used alleged "provocations" to stir a righteous fury among= [MORE]

Ink Soup: PRAYER 101
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I am a week or two shy of the age of 72 -- patriarchal= [MORE]

An A.R. Special Report
"FIGHTING FMD"

=

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, May 5, 2001 -- A 1999 study by the University of California= [MORE]

Fighting FMD
THE FOOT & MOUTH DISEASE THREAT TO AMERICA: A R=
by Dr. Jack Woodall

RIO DE JANEIRO -- [Editor's Note: The author, founder of the acclaimed = ProMED-mail tropical disease mailing list, may well be the world's foremost= [MORE]

Fighting FMD
EXPERTS DISAGREE ON BEST APPROACH TO OUTBREAK
American Reporter Staff

LOS ANGELES, May 5, 2001 -- Editor's Note: Responses to Jack Wood= all's proposal have varied from supportive to critical. Here are two respo= nses from state agriculture officials in North Carolina and Texas. [MORE]

On Native Ground: PUBLIC RADIO WAITS FOR A GREAT LEAP FORWARD =
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- At a time when newspapers, news magazines and tv news= [MORE]

Editorial: GET READY FOR 'PORN BARS'
by Joe Shea

A California liquor agency rule that prohibits bars from showingnon-obsc= ene porn films and photos is about to be repealed; now,neighborhoods across= [MORE]

Make My Day: I'VE GOT ALL MY TOES, TOO
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- For those of you who know me (and care), my wife,= [MORE]

Media Beat: APPARITIONS OF INNOCENCE IN VIETNAM
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Media commentators are split about Bob Kerrey and what hap= pened 32 years ago in the Vietnamese village of Thanh Phong. Some journalis= ts seem eager to exonerate the former senator. Others appear inclined to tu= rn him into a lightning rod for national guilt. [MORE]

Momentum: PICASSO'S PORN by Joyce Ma=
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What do performer Jennifer Lopez's nipples haveto do = with Pablo Picasso? Give me a few minutes and I'll tell you. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: IF I WANT A POLICEMAN, I'LL DIAL 9-1-1
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- There are more policemen around than you= [MORE]

Opinion: WE HAVE MET THE ENEMY'S STOCK PORTFOLIO, AND IT IS OURS
by Jim Trageser

ESCONDIDO, Calif. -- It's weeks like those just past that we realiz= e what we may have missed in not electing Ralph Nader or Pat Buchanan to th= e White House. [MORE]

Ink Soup: 170 AND COUNTING
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- In two weeks from today, on May 16, we are going to k= ill Timothy J. McVeigh as a punishment for his having killed 169 people in = the 1995 bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City. I say "we," fo= r whether you are opposed to capital punishment, as I am, or for it, it is = we together who are going to take his life, sincethe executioner will be ou= r own federal government. [MORE]

KERREY & KERRY: TWO FACES OF VIETNAM
by Joe Shea

Former U.S. Sen. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska and Massachussetts U.S. Sen. Joh= n F. Kerry are two very different men despite their identical-sounding name= s, distinguished war records, honored Senate careers, famous ex-girlfriends= [MORE]

On Native Ground: LOOKING FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Are you as sick of hearing Ari Fleischer's voice as I= [MORE]

Media Beat: MEDIA SCRUTINY OF THE 'WHITE BLOC' IS OVERDUE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- As police fired rubber bullets through tear gas in Q= uebec City, many reporters echoed the claim that "free trade" promotes demo= cracy. Meanwhile, protesters struggled to shed light on a key fact: The pro= posed hemispheric trade pact would give large corporations even more power = to override laws that have been enacted -- democratically -- to protect the= [MORE]

Make My Day: HOW DOES HE FEEL ABOUT STUNT DOUBLES?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Although I know people have differing views onwri= ters and our so-called contribution to society, I try to stay out ofthe fra= y, except to say that people who don't like writers aremouth-breathing goob= ers who watch too much pro wrestling. Other thanthat, I have no opinion. = But all that has changed thanks to an April 20 opinion column inthe online = edition of The Globe & Mail, a big Canadian newspaper based inToronto (you = can read it athttp://www.globeandmail.ca/gam/Film/20010420/RVSTRI8.html) = In an editorial whine-fest about the pending Hollywood strike bythe Writers= [MORE]

Momentum: LOVE ON A SMALL BOAT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- She was English, and her name was Clarice, which she = pronounced "Claris," so that it sounded like the name of someone who was ve= ry clear on things. And Clarice was very clear on things. She was a pros= perous, intelligent, well-traveled woman of 87, who, although stooped, frai= l, and walking with a cane, expressed the strongest of opinions. [MORE]

LOS ANGELES MURDER RATE SHOOTS UP 100%? NOT!
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- An email news briefing distributed Wednesday by the Los A= ngeles Police Commission may have left some people thinking the City of Ang= els is becoming a city of carnage with a murder rate that has climbed 100 p= ercent in a single year. [MORE]

Ink Soup: RANDY THE BUILDER
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- We have been somehow adopted by a carpenter, a young f= ellow whose family origin, Texas, and last name, Walker, testify to his kin= ship to the current occupant of the White House. Since his father is somet= hing or other in local Democratic politics, the connection is not a thing t= hey willingly talk about, though, to his credit, he is not ashamed of it. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: FROM CORONA A PLACE TO CORONA A BEER: A BRIEF HISTORY=
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- At 12, we would snicker, "I wish I were= [MORE]

Editorial: CURING THE CHECHEN MADNESS
by Joe Shea

The internationalization of the Chechen conflict was dramatically brough= t home again Sunday when Chechen gunmen seized a Swiss-owned luxury hotel i= n Istanbul; after tense hours of standoff, 13 Chechen "soldiers" were taken= [MORE]

TV-TURNOFF WEEK TURNS ME ON
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- It's been nearly 35 years now since I left my parents' home= [MORE]

Market Mover: TIME FOR A PRE-RALLY REALITY CHECK
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., April 23, 2001 -- News from Europe this morning might = cause you to hold back a bit of cash, just in case the U.S. financial media= [MORE]

INSTEAD OF BLAMING NADER, DEMOCRATS SHOULD HEED HIM
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The first 100 days of the George W. Bushadministratio= n have certainly been no surprise, unless you actuallybelieved all that "co= mpassionate conservative" nonsense that he wasspouting on the campaign trai= l. [MORE]

Media Beat: BIAS AND FEAR TILT COVERAGE OF ISRAEL
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- When the New York Times finally printed the name of= [MORE]

TITLE INFLATION
Walter M. Brasch

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- It took two directors, two executive producers, three= [MORE]

Ink Soup: ICHIRO, KAZU, AND I
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The Mariners baseball team boasts not one but two open= ly Japanese players, both of whom have captured the hearts of all fans,incl= uding this one, and compensated to a degree for the defection of A-Rod (Mr. = Alex Rodriguez to his household staff), who has elected, onhis agent's advi= ce, to join some team in Arlington, Texas, wherever thatis. Judging by th= e litter-strewn field on which they disgrace the national pastime, it would= [MORE]

On Native Ground: A SECRET TRADE PACT EVEN WORSE THAN NAFTA
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If you thought the North American Free Trade Agreemen= t (NAFTA) was a disaster, its sequel -- the Free Trade Agreement of the Ame= ricas (FTAA) -- promises to be even worse. [MORE]

Ink Soup: CATS ON GRASS, ALAS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- My cat Huck put on an amazing show for all of us this = morning, tearing about the place as if he meant to commemorate thepassing o= f Dale Earnhardt by crashing through every load-bearing wall insight. My n= iece Julie, here on a visit, assured me that he was only highon cat grass, = the stuff that I innocently bought for him, thinking itmerely a healthful s= upplement to his diet. [MORE]

Editorial: IN LOS ANGELES, DEMOCRACY HAS DIED
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- During my race for Mayor, I learned that Los Angeles has a = sad distinction: It is the nation's second largest city, yet not a single o= ne of its major daily newspapers, alternative weekly newspapers, television= [MORE]

Media Beat: IF THE E-3 AFFAIR HAPPENED HERE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- One of the ways to test for media slant is to put th= e shoe on the other foot. A big story this month provides an opportunity fo= r inquiry in the world of intense media spin. [MORE]

On Native Ground: IS IT TOO LATE TO STOP GLOBAL WARMING? =
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As I write this, in the first week of April,it's hard= [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: HIGH PROFILE CASES SHINE A LIGHT, CAST SHADOWS =
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This isn't about voting, right and wrong -- al= though at the time that was the big story. It's about what we knownow beca= use we listened then. [MORE]

Monentum: 'FRIENDS' MAY BE OUR ENEMY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Selling out used to be something to be ashamed of. No= w, if you don't sell out, it just means that no one wants to buy what you h= ave. [MORE]

DIVIDING AMOEBAE GET A HELPING HAND - OR FOOT
by Mark Perew

SANATA ANA, Calif., March 22, 2001 -- Beatles aren't the only critters who can sing, "I get by with a little help from my friends." An amoeba in the act of dividing into two amoebae can get stuck, too. [MORE]

SHEA HAILED BY L.A.P.D. CHIEF FOR 'COMMITMENT TO LEADERSHIP' American Reporter Staff
American Reporter Staff

LOS ANGELES, March 20, 2001 -- In rare praise for any political candidate, the Los Angeles Police Dept. today officially commended American Reporter Editor-in-Chief Joe Shea, a candidate for Mayor of Los Angeles in the city's April 10 primary election, for his "commitment to leadership" in calling for other mayoral candidates to leave any decision on thefuture of Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks out of their political comments. [MORE]

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

Hominy & Hash: GR=

by Constance Dunn Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Imagine! After over sixdecades of being p= roud I was born Irish in America, I discover I don't know a tinker's damn a= bout being Irish at all, and yet I can't imagine a life as anything but Iri= sh. [MORE]

On Native Ground: THE DEMOCRATS: DEAD PARTY WALKING
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The Republican rout is on. [MORE]

Make My Day: WHOSE FINGER IS THAT?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- People who know me know that I have an interest i= n things related to construction and woodworking. I enjoy learning about ne= w advances in those areas, and I'm willing to try just about anything as lo= ng as the end result isn't an electrical shock or explosion. [MORE]

Media Beat: BAD NEWS BEARS CHANGE TONE OF MEDIA SCRIPT
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- When the Ameritrade company launched a $200 millionmarke= ting drive to explain the joys of online trading in autumn 1999, abarrage o= f TV commercials invited viewers to join in the fun. The news wasbullish, a= nd the firm's motto -- "Believe in yourself" -- provided anupbeat message. = Tech stocks led advances in self-affirmation. [MORE]

LEIGH STEINBERG HAS A TAKE...ON EVERYTHING
by Steven Travers

SAN FRANCISCO -- Editor's Note: Steven Travers has workedwit= h superagent Leigh Steinberg to help develop the Sports Movie Channel. Rec= ently, Travers and Steinberg talked about sports, Hollywood, theInternet, a= nd how the 21st Century will be connected by all of them. [MORE]

PRINCE RICHARD COULD SNAP THE CURVE BALL
by Steven Travers

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- He grew up next to Steve Lavin in Marin, h= as worked the craft of acting all over the world, and now he is aheartthrob= [MORE]

AN A.R. CORRESPONDENT GOES BEFORE THE U.S. SUPREME COURT
by Thomas S. Kerrigan

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 28, 2001 -- Bundled up in a scarf and overcoat as I walked along Capitol Hill early Monday morning from my hotel -- Washington, D.C. is cold in February; there had been snow on the ground the day I arrived -- I went over my notes once more in my mind and wondered whether all the weeks of study and research had prepared for mefor the appearance that was only a few hours away, an appearance that was becoming more and more momentous in my mind. [MORE]

Copyright 2006 Joe Shea The American Reporter. All Rights Reserved.

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