A.R. ARCHIVED

Vol. 13, No. 3,269 - The American Reporter - October 11, 2007



Make My Day
SAY IT WITH A BOSTON ACCENT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- What's the funniest joke in the world? If you said the one that ends, "But the last thing he hears before he dies, is the German soldier mumbling 'tankity tankity'," I would compliment you on your superb sense of humor, marvelous taste, and the fact that I am the only other person in the world who likes that joke. [MORE]

Momentum
BETTER LUCK NEXT YEAR
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Just when I thought the year couldn't get any worse, along came the Menorah Gardens cemetery scandal. [MORE]

Merry Christmas, Dr. Soup!

Ink Soup
A BOWL OF SOUP FOR BOXING DAY

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- One of the pleasures of the holiday season is that I get to meet all the staff of this column at our grand Christmas reunion here in the office atop the World Overhill Emeritus International Something Memorial Enterprise (WOEISME), an affiliate of the Mickey Mouse Foundation [MORE]

Caring
LOVED TO 'THE VERY HAIRS OF YOUR HEAD'
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Despite his age, I think Santa must have a good head of hair. We all know he has a magnificent white beard, tumbling like cumulus clouds all over his jovial face and down on to his chest. I'm sure he never shaves. That would be blasphemy. [MORE]

On Native Ground
LOOKING FOR HOPE IN A DARK TIME
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Decades rarely begin and end neatly with rounded numbers. The Thirties began with the stock market crash in Oct. 29, 1929 and didn't end until Pearl Harbor was bombed on Dec. 7, 1941. The Forties didn't end with Hiroshima, but lingered on through the "forgotten war" in Korea. [MORE]

Media Beat
IT'S BAD NEWS WHEN MADMEN LEAD THE BLIND
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- The autumn started with a huge national jolt of shock, fear, griefand anger. Winter has begun with many worries here at home and grimsatisfaction about warfare abroad. A line from "King Lear," early in Act4, is hauntingly appropriate. [MORE]

BOMB PLOT ON PARIS-TO-MIAMI JET FOILED BY PASSENGERS
American Reporter Staff

BOSTON, Dec. 22, 2001 -- American Airlines Paris-to-Miami Flight 63 narrowly avoided catastrophe today when a passenger attempted to light a the fuse of a bomb hidden in the heels of his basketball sneakers but was stopped by an alert stewardess and then tackled and sedated by passengers aboard the transAtlantic flight. [MORE]

Momentum: PANDORA'S CHRISTMAS GIFT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I have always loved Christmas, which may be asurprising admission for a Jewish woman to make. [MORE]

Ink Soup: SWEAT EQUITY
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The section of Seattle where I now live, Ballard, has a strong Norwegian flavor. The smell of lutefisk is a thing which, after some weeks of therapy, I have learned to tolerate, and as for krumkake, I find that a filling of Ben & Jerry's frozen yoghurt makes them seem less absurdly like parodies of pastry. [MORE]

Caring
A PANIC ATTACK IN THE MEN'S DEPARTMENT
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- We were in the men's department when it happened - a full-blown panic attack while looking at the Tommy Bahama shirts. This Christmas shopping in Nordstrom's was the first she'd done in several years. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
KLEPTO AND OTHER MANIACS
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- The signs posted in dressing rooms of major department stores can not be ignored. The bold red letters proclaim Shoplifters Will Be Prosecuted and there is no doubt they mean it. [MORE]

On Native Ground
SAFETY IS AN ILLUSION
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - In the best of times, Americans are scaredy cats. They insist upon absolute safety and zero risk in everything they do. In the worst of times, as in post-Sept. 11, folks freak out even more. [MORE]

Media Beat
ANNOUNCING THE P.U.-LITZER PRIZES FOR 2001
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- The P.U.-litzer Prizes were established a decade ago to give recognition to the stinkiest media performances of the year. [MORE]

The Pooh Papers: JUDGE TO UNSEAL HUGE FILE IN POOH CASE
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 12. 2001 -- Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Ernest Hi= roshige today moved to unseal tens of thousands of documents in a long-runn= ing case that has pitted the Walt Disney Co. against heirs to the U.S. righ= ts to Winnie the Pooh in a dispute over hundreds of millions of dollars in alleged past-due and future royalties. [MORE]

Momentum
DEATH MAKES A HOLIDAY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- On the day after George Harrison died, I strolled ove= r to Strawberry Fields, the memorial in New York City's Central Park that Y= oko Ono built for her husband, John Lennon, after he was gunned down in fro= nt of their home across the street. [MORE]

Caring
WINTER IN THE AGING SOUL
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- According to research published recently in the Journal of American Medical Association, not only do physicians underprescribe for pain, 50 percent of nurses under-administer the pain medication does get ordered. [MORE]

Ink Soup
PICNIC, LIGHTNING
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The Poet Laureate of the United States, Billy Collins,= [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE REAL AMERICAN EMERGENCY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There was a story in The Miami Herald the other day about how the federal government will likely accumulate deficits until at least fiscal year 2005. [MORE]

Make My Day
WAR IS PEACE, LOVE IS HATE, SMART IS STUPID
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- People have griped about it since 1949, when Geor= ge Orwell published his doom-saying classic "1984." [MORE]

Momentum
THE IMAGE MADE REAL
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The images came first on Sept. 11, one after the other, each more shocking than the last: smoke coming out of the first World Trade Center tower; the fireball just after the second plane went in;people tumbling from the sky; a blizzard of paper; gray people running; the impossible implosion of the buildings; the silent, enormous, brooding,steaming, twisted pile. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
I REMEMBER PEARL HARBOR
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- I remember Pearl Harbor. That was the day I went from hopscotch to knitting needles. Yes, I once knit a scarf for the boys in Greenland. Oops! I'm not supposed to mention they're in Greenland. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE STORY OF ELLEN
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Ellen was a sparrow who lived alone with her mother in a nest in a tall pine tree in the middle of a great forest... ---Where's her daddy? [MORE]

Editorial
PEACE IS NOT AN OPTION
by Joe Shea

If bombings like those that took 26 innocent lives on Saturday and Sunday had occurred every day for the past 120 days in Israel, that nation would have lost the number of people the United States lost on a single day in September. If the 1,000 or so Palestinians killed since Ariel Sharon visited the Temple Mount nine months ago died on a single day, there would have to be three or four such days to equal the carnage in New York City on Sept. 11. If you spent the gross domestic product (GDP) of Israel and the Palestinian Authority, about $110 billion in 2000, you could spend that much for six days in a row before you would equal the expense of that one day of terrorism against the United States. [MORE]

+ In Memoriam +
George Harrison
"Thanks For The Music"

Passings: George Harrison
ALL THINGS MUST PASS

by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO: My dear George: You are gone, and so now I can write you the love letter that I knew would never reach you. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE BATTLE BETWEEN 'JIHAD' AND 'McWORLD'
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There are many subtexts to our current "war on terrorism." But many of them lead back to the one thing that I have long maintained would be the defining struggle of our new century - how to counter the ever-increasing corporate control of our planet. [MORE]

Media Beat
'GEOGRAPHICAL CORRECTNESS' MAY COME AS A JOLT
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- There were unconfirmed reports yesterday that the United States is not the center of the world. [MORE]

War On Terror
NEPAL JOINS WAR ON TERRORISM AFTER MAOIST ATTACKS
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, Nov. 28 -- The government of Nepal has declared a state of emergency and ordered the mobilization of Nepalese Army following a series of violent attacks by ultra-leftist Maoist terrorists who broke a four-month-old cease-fire agreement with the country's rulers. [MORE]

Momentum
AS THE WORLD SCREAMS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Imagine that the earth itself is a living organism. T= he dirt and rock we walk on is only its thick protective skin, but its vuln= erable body lies deep inside. Imagine it's like a sea urchin, with a hard s= hell on the outside and a soft living coral center. [MORE]

Media Beat
A SWEET MESSAGE FOR AMERICANS: 'WE ARE FAMILY'
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- On the magazine cover, the big headline next to Opra= h's shoulder is as warm and cuddly as the pair of cocker spaniels in her la= p. "WE ARE FAMILY," it says. "Now more than ever: the power and plea= sure of feeling connected." [MORE]

America At War
Editorial: BEYOND AFGHANISTAN
by Joe Shea

With the end of the Afghanistan stage of the War Against Terrorism now in sight, it behooves every American to try to look beyond the immediate fighting and help our nation determine where we go from here. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
GENERATION X REVEALED ITSELF ON SEPT. 11
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- If I gave it any thought at all a few months a= go, I would have thought the "X" in Generation X stood for an unknown quant= ity -- I couldn't think of anything particularly noteworthy of the designat= ed group as a whole, leaving aside the spectacular few. [MORE]

Caring
HOLIDAY'S SHARP EDGES SEEM SOFTER NOW
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- It is at the same time a profound and a silly thing, both theater of the absurd and nursery of things beautiful and tender. It can delight and elevate, irritate and exasperate all within the space of a few hours. [MORE]

On Native Ground
LAND OF THE FREE? NOT UNDER U.S.A PATRIOT ACT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- While most Americans were busy hanging flags andfrett= ing about anthrax, your elected representatives in Washington decidedto rep= eal a large chunk of the U.S. Constitution. [MORE]

America At War
THE SWISS CONNECTION: BIOWEAPONS, MILITANTS AND MORE
by Lucy Komisar

GENEVA -- To protect America from terrorist attack, the United States must investigate illicit trade in biological weapons and trace the movement of terrorist money. A good starting point is a controversial Swiss bank that may have facilitated the sale of hazardous biological materials to Islamic militants. [MORE]

Momentum
THE THANKSGIVING OF THE EMPTY CHAIR
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - This is a strange Thanksgiving, my friends. It is the Thanksgiving of the empty chair. [MORE]

Brasch Words
TWIN TOWERS FUND SLOW TO HELP TO VICTIMS, BUT DEADLINE FOR GIFTS IS MET
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa., Nov. 21, 2001 -- Almost two months after the Sept. 11 national tragedy, and sandwiched between two Congressional investigative hearings about how charities are distributing donations to victims and their families, New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani announced that the city-sponsored Twin Towers Fund will finally begin to release funds. The Twin Towers Fund had accumulated $85 million since Sept. 11, but had not provided assistance. [MORE]

Ink Soup
CONRAD'S SECRET AGENT HAS MEANING TODAY
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, WASH. -- The other week I wrote in this space about Camus' novel "The Plague," a fiction with obvious relevance to our current fears of mass infection. [MORE]

Caring
ANTIDOTES TO ANHEDONIA
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I learned an important lesson when I was young, alone and very ill in San Jose, Costa Rica. It was this: You can survive treachery, existential acts and parasites, but candles and fresh flowers are not a negotiable part of any life worth living. [MORE]

America At War
A THANKLESS THANKSGIVING FOR FAMILIES OF U.S. SOLDIERS: NO FOOD AND $95 BANK CHARGES
by Mark Scheinbaum

HOLLYWOOD, Fla., Nov. 18, 2001 -- Retiree Don Moffett of Key Largo announced from the podium that the food pantry was bare, and started passing the sheet for donation pledges around the restaurant meeting room. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WHO'S AFRAID OF ANTHRAX?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It was a short drive to the Post Office, yet I wondered as I drove if this were just wasted motion. My husband had warned his sister about opening her mail, since it would go through the Brentwood Post Office to reach her Washington, D.C., apartment. [MORE]

Make My Day
ULTIMATE FRISBEE IN UTRECHT: WHAT'S DUTCH FOR C.P.R.?
by Erik Deckers

UTRECHT, The Netherlands -- Those who know me know that one of my favorite pastimes is playing Ultimate Frisbee. In college, I was known to drop everything to play a couple of games, and could always be counted on to have a disc or two in my book bag. [MORE]

Congratulations to Dr. Eduardo Luna!

Editorial
OUR SON, THE DOCTOR

by Joe Shea

NOVEMBER 15, 2001 -- "Our son, the doctor": I can say that now, albeit with a bit of a hitch in my step, because Dr. Eduardo Luna is my stepson by my lovely wife, Mireya. Just the same, I am so proud today I could bust. [MORE]

Momentum
JOURNALISTS FIND IT HARD TO STAY 'UPSTREAM FROM THE HERD'
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- To explain the philosophy that underlies a culture of conformity, the Japanese say that the nail which sticks out attracts the hammer. In America since Sept. 11, we have seen that fear of hammers throw almost the entire American media into a paroxysm of censorship and self-censorship. [MORE]

The American Way
HOW ABOUT THE WAR AGAINST KIDS?
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., Nov. 14, 2001 -- My guess is I'm not alone in feeling that swirling sentiments of war, anger, and sadness have turned my ethical and moral compass into a Cuisinart of mush. I look at the tangled, soggy mess and identify and retrieve only the chunks I like. [MORE]

America At War
KABUL FALLS TO NORTHERN ALLIANCE AS TALIBAN FLEE
by Joe Shea

NOVEMBER 13, 2001 -- Afghanistan's capital city of Kabul fell to the forces of the Northern Alliance, America's allies in the wear against terrorism there, as Taliban troops pounded for days by American bombing runs abandoned their posts Monday and fled south towards Kandahar. [MORE]

AMERICAN AIRLINES JET CRASHES IN NEW YORK, KILLING 265
American Reporter Staff

NOVEMBER 13, 2001 -- An Airbus A-300 widebody passenger jet broke apart in mid-air shortly after takeoff Monday en route to the Dominican Republic and slammed into the small residential community of Far Rockaways in the borough of Queens, an area of New York City already devastated by the loss of some 750 residents in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. [MORE]

Caring
BLESSED ARE THE LOST
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- A large percentage of the elderly are afflicted with it, but what exactly is dementia? [MORE]

The American Way
ON VETERANS' DAY, AN OLD VET HAS ADVICE ON NEW WAR
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Nov. 11, 2001 -- God willing, or at least if He remembers Normandy, my Dad will celebrate another Veterans' Day. Nowadays as the Parkinson's continues its capricious attack, words come in short, breathless spurts. Sentences are as tough to get as pouring frozen honey from a thimble. [MORE]

On Native Ground
OF GOD AND MAN AT WAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- God Bless America. [MORE]

Momentum: THE AFGHANI WOMAN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In a warm and tender moment, my husband wraps his arms around me and holds me tight against his heart. [MORE]

An A.R. Essay
1-2-3-4, WHAT ARE WE FIGHTING FOR? CIVILIZATION.
by Howard Bloom

NEW YORK -- The nation's intellectual elite is batting around a question these days: Is the current war against Osama a war against Islam? Certainly that's what Osama bin Laden would like to make it But it's not. [MORE]

Ink Soup: DEPT. OF FUNNY COINCIDENCE - NOT!
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- During my years as Cartoon Editor of the old Saturday Review (under the editorship of Norman Cousins and then Carll Tucker) I often received in the mail a drawing that strongly reminded me of something I'd seen before. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
SONGS OF WAR: THE DRUMS RUM-TUMMING EV'RYWHERE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When Barbara Streisand closed the Emmy Awards Show with an inimitable rendition of "You'll Never Walk Alone," she proved once more that music certainly "...doth have charms to soothe the savage breast." [MORE]

Commentary
ARE WE ON THE BRINK 0F LIMITLESS WAR?
by Will Hart

TUSCON, Ariz. -- Nearly everyone seems to agree that military action had to be taken against the terrorists that committed the atrocities of September 11. But what actions exactly has the American public agreed to? President Bush initially outlined a campaign that had two goals: Neutralize Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaeda network and get rid of the Taliban. Those twin goals seemed logical and doable at first glance. As a nation, we signed on. [MORE]

Caring: THE BEAUTY IN THE BEAST
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I spent Hallowe'en in psychiatric intensive care. I was the= re to get oriented -- as an evening shift nurse, learning the medications a= nd paperwork. I wondered if I would last the night. [MORE]

Editorial: HOW I CAME TO LOVE THE WAR
by Joe Shea

Can anyone imagine Muhammad Ali saying just after the Sept. 11 attacks on New York, "I don't have any quarrel" with Osama bin Laden and his Al Qaeda network, as the champ famously said of the Viet Cong 30 years ago? [MORE]

An A.R. Editorial: THIS STRIKE HIT THE HEART
by Joe Shea

President George W. Bush, so often maligned in these pages, threw a pitch last night at the opening of the third game of the World Series that landed dead center in the strike zone of the American heart. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
IT'S ABOUT TIME, INDIANA
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It's really very simple: Hoosiers never= [MORE]

A.R. Essay: RISKING ALL FOR ISRAEL
by Joe Shea

The United States lost more of its citizens last month to Middle Eastern terrorism than Israel has lost in several wars and dozens of bombings since the end of the War for Independence in 1948. Israelis soldiers have killed more Palestinians in the past year than the combined armed forces of the United States have killed since the end of the Gulf War. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE MOVEMENT: A PARABLE
by Clarence Brown

PRINCETON, N.J. -- You thought it was just you. They were doing it to th= e others, not just to you, but it seemed that you were the only one who hat= ed them for it. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
SO, WHAT ELSE IS NEW?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- There's not a day goes by that John and I don'= t greet each other evenings with my saying, "Hi, what's new?" And, predicta= bly, he'll answer, "New York, New Jersey... ." And if he doesn't detect my= [MORE]

Caring: JORDAN CALLING
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- The Cinderella I introduced here a few weeks back finally g= ot her new leg and first therapy session just days before the call from her= [MORE]

An A.R. Essay
NOW WHAT?
by Arun Mehta

NEW DELHI, India -- The world changed on September 11 for everybody. Thi= s is how the world must have felt after Hiroshima, when we realized that we= [MORE]

America At War
ANTHRAX SCARE MOVES WEST, HITS HOLLYWOOD; PLAN FOR=
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 13, 2001 4:00 a.m. PDT -- A Hollywood studio and the Los Angeles Times joined the list Friday of high-profile communicatio= ns companies where workers have opened envelopes containing a white powdery= [MORE]

Media Beat
FOR AFGHAN KIDS, STARVATION AND DOLLAR BILLS
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon's air drops of food parcels and President Bus= h's plea for American children to aid Afghan kids with dollar bills will go= [MORE]

America At War
F.B.I. WARNS OF NEW TERRORIST ATTACKS =
by Joe Shea

WASHNGTON, Oct. 11, 2001 -- The FBI has warned Americans in an urgent ad= visory to be on guard for new domestic attacks in the next several days by terrorists linked to Osama bin Laden, the suspected author of the devastati= ng Sept. 11 assaults on the World Trade Center's twin towers and the Pentag= on that claimed more than 6,300 lives. In a brief statement released late= [MORE]

U.S. REITERATES SUPPORT FOR PALESTINIAN STATE
by Joe Shea

WASHINGTON, Oct. 11, 2001 -- President George W. Bush at a nationally te= levised White House press conference this afternoon unexpectedly reiterated= [MORE]

PRESIDENT RENEWS VOW TO BRING AL-QAIDA TO JUSTICE
by Joe Shea

WASHINGTON, Oct. 11, 2001 -- In his first live news conference from the White House since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington= , President George W. Bush spoke to the nation on the first-month anniversa= ry of the attacks and vowed anew to bring suspected terrorist ringleader Os= ama bin Laden to justice and to root out his al-Qaida terorism network arou= nd the globe. [MORE]

A.R.'S TRAGESER HONORED BY SAN DIEGO PRESS CLUB
American Reporter Staff

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 12, 2001 -- The American Reporter was recognized for journalistic excellence by the San Diego Press Club on Thursday evening. [MORE]

Momentum
THE RECURRING NIGHTMARE OF SEPTEMBER 11
by Joyce Marcel

Dummerston, Vt. -- It's been exactly a month since the Sept. 11attacks, and I still return to the World Trade Center every night in my dreams. [MORE]

Brasch Words
CROCODILE TEARS AND A CASH-REGISTER MENTALITY
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- The news release spoke boldly. "In view of the Septem= ber 11 attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon," the release stat= ed, "this is the time for Corporate America and all government agencies to enhance the safety and security of the nation's high profile buildings." [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE WHITE GLOVE AND AFTER
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- There is a lot of talk in the papers about the ginger= ly way in which comedians are trying to return to the business of making pe= ople laugh. The late-night talk show hosts, who feast on current events, m= ust be having a horrible time of it. I am never up when they are on, so I= [MORE]

Media Beat
TV NEWS IS A MILITARIZED ZONE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON, Oct. 9, 2001 --When the bombing of Afghanistan resumed Monda= y night, Oct. 8, retired generals showed no fatigue at their posts under ho= t lights at network studios. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WE WILL NOW RESUME OUR REGULAR PROGRAMMING
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- As I recall, not long after 12 o'clock no= on, Central time, the word BULLETIN interrupted Bozo the Clown and W= alter Cronkite announced that President Kennedy was shot in Dallas, Texas. [MORE]

America At War
U.S., BRITAIN LAUNCH AIR WAR ON AFGHANISTAN =
by Jo=e Shea

WASHINGTON Oct. 7, 2001 -- Acting on orders from President George W. Bush, 40 American bombers struck military targets in Afghanistan this morning and a British submarine launched Tomahawk missiles against Osama bin Laden's terrorist training camps in response to the Sept. 11 attacks that killed thousands of Americans at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. [MORE]

On Native Ground
DON'T LET FREE SPEECH BE A CASUALTY OF WAR by Randolph T. Holhut
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The thought police are on the prowl, making sure that all good Americans stand united and resolute behind President Bush and his dministration in the conduct of the war against international terrorism. [MORE]

Market Mover
BUY, SELL, & HOLD YOUR NOSE
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. Oct. 5, 2001 -- Stock recommendations from brokerage fi= rms are a little like a blind date with the ugly daughter of your Mom's bo= ss. "Don't worry, she's attractive," Mom would say. [MORE]

Momentum: KILLING THEM SOFTLY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There are two ways to train a dog -- affection and fe= ar. Maybe the United States has the same kind of choice when it comes to de= aling with its enemies. I am not alone in believing that we should try to e= nd terrorism with a combination of kindness and capitalism. [MORE]

IN JAKARTA, THE SMALL TALK IS OF JIHAD
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, Oct. 2, 2001 -- It was a warm evening in Jakarta last Monday an= d I cooled myself down in a cozy garden restaurant, a place where Indonesia= n journalists, artists, and sometimes its fiery student leaders, spend many= [MORE]

Ink Soup: WHAT'S TO LOVE?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The Elliott Bay Book Co. is located in the oldest part= [MORE]

Editorial
HOW THE FUTURE IS BETRAYED
by Joe Shea

This is not an editorial about the economy, but the economy is a good place to begin. This is an editorial about where things must end. [MORE]

A NEW YORKER'S DAY OF TERROR
by Constance Daley with Gene Albertelli

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- (Editor's Note: Regrettably, we were unable to publish on Sept. 11 and Sept. 12, and this article was temporarily lost. We publish it now with our apologies to the authors.) Yesterday, the majestic southern skyline of New York crumbled at her feet with the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center collapsing inwardly at the insult, not keeling over in defeat. [MORE]

Ink Soup
TWO PLANS FOR THE END OF DAYS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- Now here are my plans, both of them. 1) The obvious plan. We have been hit. This is war. We will find out who was behind the= [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE BRAVERY OF BARBARA LEE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President Bush's address to Congress on Sept. 20 was a declaration of war that is unprecedented in our nation's history. What Bush declared was a war that has no geographic limits, no clearly defined enemies, no clearly defined goals and no clear beginning or end. In short, a permanent war. [MORE]

Momentum
WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM JERRY FALWELL?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The week after the terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington, the Rev. Jerry Falwell apologized for saying on Pat Robertson's "The 700 Club" television show that they reflected God's judgment on a nation spiritually weakened by the American Civil Liberties Union, providers of abortion, supporters of gay rights, and federal court rulings banning prayer in schools. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE 'WIMP' FACTOR MAY BE GOADING BUSH
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Back in 1988, the father of our current president was bedeviled by what media outlets called "the wimp factor." After eight years as vice president, George Bush was making a run for the Oval Office. [MORE]

American Essay
FROM THE TERROR, TIMELESS PERSONAL LESSONS
by Gary Gach

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- As the world sorts through the rubble, internal and external, following September 11, I'm beginning to recover my own voice. For a while I was in shock. Frozen, almost. Numb. [MORE]

Caring: A NOD TO AGING EROS
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- George loved trains, music, and women -- mostly women. [MORE]

BANK SECRECY SPEEDS MONEY TO TERRORISTS
by Lucy Komisar

NEW YORK -- Terrorist networks all over the world depend on the international bank and corporate secrecy system to hide and move their money. This structure is allowed to exist by agreement of the world's banks and financial powers. A lot of people make money from it, including the owners and managers of banks that hide customers' deposits from tax authorities. But an unintendedconsequence is that it helps worldwide networks of terrorists. Terrorists need a way to finance operations in dozens of countries around the globe, to pay for houses, salaries, transport, weapons and explosives. They need to move millions quickly and without detection. They can't carry the cash in suitcases. But transferring millions of dollars using secret bank accounts and shell companies is easy. [MORE]

TALIBAN 'ENCOURAGE' OSAMA TO 'LEAVE OF HIS OWN FREE WILL'
by Joe Shea

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan, Sept. 21, 2001 (1 a.m. PST) -- Defying American demands to hand over the prime suspect in the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, a three-day meeting of Afghanistan's ruling clerical council expressed regret early Friday morning for the attacks and called on terrorism suspect Osama Bin Laden to "leave Afghanistan of his own free will" but then declared that Islamic nations must join an international Islamic jihad, or holy war, against the United States if it is attacked. [MORE]

Terror & The Press
WHEN JOURNALISTS REPORT FOR DUTY
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- In Time magazine's special issue about the events of Sept. 11, chilling photos evoke the horrific slaughter in Manhattan. All of the pages are deadly serious. And on the last page, under the headline "The Case for Rage and Retribution," an essay by Time regular Lance Morrow declares: "A day cannot live in infamy without the nourishment of rage. Let's have rage." [MORE]

Make My Day: WHO WANTS TO BE SMART?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Regis Philbin: Welcome back to "Who Wants To Be a Celebrity Millionaire?" the show where I engage in witty banter wit= h rich celebrities while they try to win money for their favorite charities= . [MORE]

Momentum: THE DAGGER IN OUR EYE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Many people don't know this, but during the Persian Gulf War, only a handful of newspapers in the United States had the courage to editorialize against it. One was my hometown newspaper, the Brattleboro (Vt.) Reformer. At the time, it was also my employer. [MORE]

Market Mover
STEVE LONG WAS BIN LADEN'S WORST NIGHTMARE
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla. -- Regrettably and ironically, Osama bin Laden and I now have something in common: Neither one of us will ever get to meet U.S. Army Maj. Stephen V. Long. [MORE]

Terror & The Press
THE PRESS HAS FAILED US
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A couple of days after the horror in New York and Washington, I got an e-mail from Carl Jensen, founder of the press analysis project called Project Censored. [MORE]

Terror & The Press
OUR MEDIA'S BEEN INCURIOUS ABOUT TERRORISM
by Ron Kenner

HOLLYWOOD -- Since last week's terrorist attack on America, the media has demonstrated the extraordinary skill, talent, dedication and perseverance of sleepless and caring, decent journalists. I subscribe to the Los Angeles Times and The New York Times, and both (along with many Internet publications) have offered much useful coverage. [MORE]

On Native Ground
A TIME TO THINK CLEARLY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The war drums are beating. The primal urge for revenge is rising. The flags are waving and blind patriotism is the orderof the day. And many, many more innocents will die. [MORE]

AMERICA'S LOSS OF INNOCENCE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As I write this early on Wednesday morning, all I can think is that now it's about us. [MORE]

An A.R. Editorial
CHOOSING A JUST PUNISHMENT FOR A TERRIBLE CRIME
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- No one can feel sanguine about the reprisals that are in the works against terrorists who destroyed the World Trade Center towers and scarred the Pentagon. [MORE]

TERRORISM, TV AND THE RAGE FOR VENGEANCE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- We stare at television screens and try to comprehend the s= uffering in the aftermath of terrorism. Much of what we see is ghastly and all too real: terrible anguish and sorrow. [MORE]

On Native Ground
STAR WARS REDUX: PEACE FOR A PIPE DREAM
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- During the week that marked the 10th anniversary of the failed coup in the Soviet Union - the event that led to its eventualcol= lapse -- President Bush took two steps that showed that in some cornersof W= ashington, the Cold War never ended. [MORE]

Caring: MOVING MAMA
by Cindy Hasz

SAM DIEGO -- She was 80 and I liked being with her better than wit= h most folks my own age. We just clicked, her an' me. She was from Montana where there's wide-open spaces, big mountains an' lots of lonely. The kinda= [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
SECRET RULING ON POOH RIGHTS 'DEVASTATING' TO DISNEY, PLAINTIFFS SAY
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, August 23, 2001 -- A still-secret decision on sanctions against the Burbank-based Walt Disney Co. for "willful destruction" of evidence in a long-running royalties battle is "devastating" to its claim that it owes no royalties on Winnie The Pooh videos, computer software and other commercializations of the world's most popular cartoon character, a plaintiffs' attorney familiar with the sealed opinion said Wednesday. [MORE]

DISNEY ASKS NEW AUDIT OF POOH ROYALTIES
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, August 17, 2001 -- The Walt Disney Co., apparently stung by= [MORE]

FINAL ARGUMENTS DUE ON POOH ROYALTIES
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, August 15, 2001 -- Final arguments are due today in Los Ang= eles County Superior Court after a two-day hearing on accounting methods us= ed by the Walt Disney Co. to calculate Winnie The Pooh royalties paid to th= e heirs of "Red Ryder" producer Stephen A. Slesinger. [MORE]

LEGAL TITANS CLASH OVER POOH'S HONEY
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, August 14, 2001 -- Two of the most famous lawyers in Americ= a quietly collided Monday in a California courtroom over royalty payments o= n one of the most famous and lucrative literary characters ever created, wi= th Hollywood superlawyer Bert Fields saying the owners of U.S. and Canadian= [MORE]

Editorial: THERE'S NO MORAL SIDE IN MID-EAST CONFLICT
by Joe Shea

We have watched events unfold at a quickening pace in the Middle East with a mixture of dread, anticipation and sorrow. Dread because we know that the ultimate resolution of this spiraling conflict could involve a regional war, an energy embargo or even the use of nuclear weapons; anticipation because we constantly await intervention on the side of peace -- divine, American, or multinational, or, God forbid, Iraqi, Iran= ian, Syrian, Libyan on the side of war, even as we also await the next bomb= ing, bulldozing, rocket attack or assassination in the region; and sorrow b= ecause we know it is so unnecessary. God must hate these people, I sometim= es think, because they do so many terrible things to one another in His nam= e. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE PRESS FAILS TO DO ITS DUTY?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The press heaped hosannas on Katherine Grahamupon her= [MORE]

Make My Day: THE SHARK-JUMPING MOMENT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Does anyone not remember the three-part episode of "Happy Days" where the gang went to California, had all kinds of kooky adventures, sappy love scenes, and finally the big breath-taking, daredevil, Dear-God-I-Can't-Look! scene where The Fonz actually water-ski-jumped over a shark after a bet with a smug California beach-jerk? (And did anyone notice that the entire opening paragraph was just one long run-on sentence?) [MORE]

Momentum:
FRAIL MY HEART: FOLK MUSIC AND ME (PART I) by Joyce Marcel
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In my neck of the woods, New England, last week was folk music heaven. The Falcon Ridge Folk Festival was held on the green rolling hills of Long Hill Farm in Hillsdale, N.Y., the weekend of July 27-29, followed right afterward, on the same site, by the Winterhawk Festival, dedicated to "bluegrass and beyond." [MORE]

Ink Soup: FONS ET CETERA
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- [Brown is away on assignment. Today's column is by= [MORE]

Cindy Hasz: A RELUCTANT PROPHET OF NURSING HOME REFORM
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I used to think getting fired was the end of the world= , the scarlet F; it was the equivalent of going to the brig, or getting run= [MORE]

Exclusive: OCTANE RATING SLIPS ALONG WITH GASOLINE PRICES
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- If you live in Los Angeles, take a good look at the octane rating for premium gas when you stop by to fill up your tank today. [MORE]

Momentum: THE BLACK AND WHITE OF COLOR TELEVISION
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There's a yin and a yang to everything,= [MORE]

Ink Soup: KARTOON KAMP
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I am in recovery from my first effort to teach cartoon= ing to three little boys. If only I'd thought of it in time, I would have done homage to George Herriman, creator of Krazy Kat and the greatest of Am= erican comic strip artists, by calling it the Kartoon Kamp. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: PANIC!
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- The sound of footsteps coming into the da= rkened room was no reason to stir from an early morning dream -- the best k= ind. It would be John stepping back in to say as usual, "S'long sunshine,= see ya later," before driving off to work in the hour before dawn.This morn= ing was different. Today he spoke words that stood my hair onend, sent chil= ls down my spine and my teeth on edge. [MORE]

Editorial: DAY OF THE VIRUS
by Joe Shea

In the last five days I've gotten about 40 email messages containing the= [MORE]

FMD IN WALES 'MISSED THE PRESS'
by Allan R. Andrews

ANNAPOLIS, Md. -- A week after reporting that foot and mouth disease has= [MORE]

On Native Ground: TO DIE IN GENOA
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt., July 28, 2001 -- It was inevitable, given the fear of t= he established order when faced with organized dissent, that someone would die in Genoa during the G-8 summit. Since the demonstrations at the World= [MORE]

Media Beat: THE MEDIA'S DANCE ON CARLO GIULIANI'S GRAVE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- After a police officer shot Carlo Giuliani in the head, Ti= me magazine published a requiem of sorts -- explaining that the 23-year-old= [MORE]

Momentum: A DEMONSTRATION OF EMOTION
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When I arrived at the demonstration I burst into tear= s. A few moments later, I was surprised to find myself taking shelter in a= [MORE]

In Memoriam: AN AFTERNOON WITH MISS EUDORA
by Clarence Brown

JACKSON, Miss. -- On the telephone she'd said, "Tell the driver it's the Belhaven neighborhood - he'll know where that is." Her house is across the street from Belhaven College, in northeast Jackson. She comes out onto the front step when the cab pulls into the yard of 1119 Pinehurst Street and smiles at the automobile. There is some delay while the young cabby fumbles for change and the mechanism that will unlock my door. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: PRODUCING NEW YORK
by Constance Daley

NEW YORK, N.Y. -- A three-day weekend comprising a 12-hour Saturday, full Sunday and a 12-hour Monday might appear to offer little time to enjoy everything planned for a weekend in New York. Not so. Not if you cram-jam 60 fully-rounded seconds into every minute of every hour. [MORE]

Ink Soup: THE HA-HA CURE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- At the Harborview Medical Center here there is a Laughing Club. Nurses, receptionists, orderlies, interns. They meet once a day in the morning in some park near the hospital. For 15 minutes they look at each other and ... laugh. That's it. [MORE]

An AR Analysis MOUNTAIN OF PROBLEMS AWAITS MEGAWATI
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA -- New Indonesian President Megawati Sukarnoputri is arguably the most popular leader in Indonesia, having fervent supporters in all walks of life, from movie stars to street vendors, from Muslim clerics to Christian activists in this vast archipelago of 220 million people. [MORE]

IN PEACEFUL SHIFT, INDONESIA GETS A NEW PRESIDENT
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, July 23, 2001 -- In a fast-moving and dramatic political struggle that involved many political parties, the military, the police, and the media, Indonesia's national assembly fired President Abdurrahman Wahid and today installed his deputy Megawati Sukarnoputri as president. [MORE]

WAHID GOVERNMENT NEARS COLLAPSE IN INDONESIA
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, July 23, 2001 -- Indonesia's President Abdurrahman Wahid today ordered the dissolution of parliament, "froze" the main opposition party Golkar and called for elections a year from now, but his generals and Jakarta police refused to carry out the orders as leaders of the nation's parliament gathered to oust him. [MORE]

Native Ground: LET'S GET BIG MONEY OUT OF POLITICS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- No one does absurdity quite like Congress. What other conclusion can one come to after watching them argue over the "Patients Bill of Rights" and campaign finance reform. [MORE]

Editorial: HOW MUCH SEX DOES AMERICA WANT?
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- A cartoon in the news section of the LA Weekly's July 19 edition shows a tiny fellow of indeterminate age, maybe 15 or so, masturbating in one panel as he watches tv, and then angrily stomping on his emission in the next. [MORE]

Media Beat: KATHARINE GRAHAM'S FIRST DRAFT
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Some time before he committed suicide 38 years ago, leaving the Washington Post Co. in the hands of his widow Katharine, publisher Philip Graham described journalism as "the first draft of history." [MORE]

Make My Day: LORD OF THE FISH
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Friday, July 6 -- We made it! After a 20-hour drive from Indiana, we made it to Red Lake, Ontario (that's in Canada) for our annual fly-in fishing trip. Each summer, we spend a week up in Northwest Ontario, eating, fishing, smoking cigars, telling jokes, and enjoying the scenery and moderate weather, and maybe drinking a beer or two. Between us. All week long. I swear. [MORE]

An AR Essay: THE OVERBLOWN IDIOT OF THE WORLD COMMUNITY? by Ron Kenner
by Ron Kenner

HOLLYWOOD -- I spent a lot of time this month reading overheated and self-congratulatory Fourth of July editorials celebrating our American independence. A few weeks later, the firecrackers are still going off and still scaring pets, and politicians are still proclaiming we're the most powerful nation in the world. Undoubtedly, we have the capacity to blow up anything. [MORE]

i>On Native Ground: BBC PULLS THE PLUG ON SHORTWAVE LISTENERS by Randolph T. Holhut
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In the summer of 1984, I was living in Wolfeboro Falls, N.H., near Lake Winnipesaukee. It was a dead zone for television and radio and the Boston papers just barely made it up there. [MORE]

Momentum: N.Y. TIMES AS 'NEWSPAPER OF PART OF THE RECORD'
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision for Jonathan Tasini of the National Writers Union (I am a member) over The New York Times, the 1976 U.S. Copyright Law was upheld, freelance writers' rights were reasserted, and publishers and data collectors were told to stop stealing their work. [MORE]

Media Beat: MEDIA MANIA OVER CONDIT SCANDAL GOES OVER THE TOP
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Like many other news items that have ballooned to huge national proportions in recent years, the story that made Gary Condit infamous has been largely propelled by cable television. It's the media scandal of the season. Eager to rev up their ratings, the networks are in salacious overdrive. [MORE]

Make My Day: ATTACK OF THE DISNEY SIDEKICKS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- The following is from a future episode of the Charlie Rose Show, which can be seen on your local public television station. [MORE]

Cindy Hasz: THE YATES TRAGEDY REVEALS EVILS OF PASSIVITY
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- It's been over two weeks now since Andrea Yates killed= [MORE]

MAOIST INSURGENTS KILL 41 POLICEMEN IN NEPAL
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, July 7, 2001 -- Underground Maoist rebels in thisland-locked and troubled Kingdom killed at least 41 policemen last nightin three separa= te incidents in western Nepal. It was the most deadlyattack by Maoists sin= ce the Royal Palace massacre, in which 10 peopleincluding the King, Queen, Crown Prince, and members of the royal familywere killed by the former Crow= n Prince. [MORE]

On Native Ground: THE QUARTERLIFE CRISIS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- You've heard of midlife crisis, that point when you h= it 50 and generally freak out. Now, in this accelerated age we are living i= n, there's a new malady: The quarterlife crisis. [MORE]

A.R. Special Report:
TOURISM TO BEAUTIFUL WALES HURT BY FMD EPID=
by Allan R. Andrews

FISHGUARD, Pembrokeshire, Wales -- Foot-and-mouth disease, which has mad= e eating beef in Britain a rare event, is subtly devastating the tourist tr= ade in this paradise of nature and Celtic history. [MORE]

Momentum: LOVE LETTER TO A FLEA MARKET
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Sunny Sunday mornings in summer mean only one thing t= o me -- the flea market is open. I'm out of bed and in my car as the sun is= [MORE]

Happy Birthday, America!

Editorial: LO=

by Joe Shea

As we celebrate America's birthday today, I can't resist the observation= [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: LIFE'S A BEACH
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When I first saw a T-shirt emblazoned "L= ife's a Beach," I took it the wearer was just back from vacationing at a Cl= ub Med resort with sea, sand and casinos. And, I took the words to mean: "= That's the life, to be on a beach." [MORE]

An A.R. Essay: BOOMING IN AMERICA
by Lory Medina

LONG BEACH, Calif. -- I've just relocated to California, and I'm activel= y watching things. [MORE]

On Native Ground: SAYING 'GOOD NIGHT' TO THE EVENING NEWSPAPER
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- My newspaper, the Eagle Times, ended nearly 87= [MORE]

WITH APOLOGIES TO DYLAN, ORWELL FROM THE GRAVE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- I dreamed I saw George Orwell last night. Alive as you or me. [MORE]

Momentum: ERASING 'THE FIRST DRAFT OF HISTORY'
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Remember the spoiled kid who whined that he'd take hi= s toys and go home if you didn't play the game his way? That's the way = The New York Times has been behaving since June 25, when the U.S. Supre= me Court ruled against the paper and in favor of freelancers' rights. It is= n't a pretty sight. [MORE]

American Essay: EX-PROSECUTOR WARNS AGAINST NEW WAR CRIMES LAW
by Benjamin B. Ferencz

NEW ROCHELLE, N.Y. -- A misguided trap is being set by right-wingconserv= atives. It threatens our national security interests and endangersour milit= ary personnel. [MORE]

Ink Soup: GOING HOME
by Clarence Brown

ON THE ROAD, U.S.A. -- I do not feel well in my soul. This protracted e= ve of the drive across the country, from Seattle to the coast of South Caro= lina, has begun to weigh on me. I'd feel better, I think, if I got up one m= orning and decided to drive to DeBordieu and -- left. Pillaging and lootin= g the locals for my needs along the way. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: CARROLL O'CONNOR WAS PART OF THE FAMILY
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- I didn't know him and yet I knew him so w= ell. Carroll O'Connor, born in the Bronx as my husband was -- raised in Qu= eens as I was -- pursued a career we would follow for just those reasons. [MORE]

7.9 QUAKE KILLS AT LEAST 47, INJURES HUNDREDS IN PERU
by Joe Shea

AREQUIPA, Peru, June 24, 2001 -- One of the most powerful earthquakes ev= er to hit the Western Hemisphere struck the "white city" of Arequipa, Peru,= [MORE]

On Native Ground: EUROPEANS AREN'T ANTI-AMERICAN, JUST ANTI-BUSH
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's been amusing to read how the conservative chattering class has reacted to President Bush's recent trip to Europe. [MORE]

THE FUTURE IS STREAMING
by Joe Shea

LONG BEACH, Calif. -- In 1980, I dreamed that streaming particles of lig= ht came flowing through my room in waves that passed with equal ease throug= h flesh and plaster. Later, as I began to hear about theorized faster-than= -light particles called tachyons, I wrote a short story called "The Eyes of= [MORE]

Momentum: CENSORING THE INTERNET IN THE NAME OF KIDS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What is the biggest threat to children on the Interne= t? Of the more than 39,000 Netscape users who voted on that question on We= dnesday, 45 percent said the biggest threat by far was sexual predators. Po= rn was considered a bigger threat by 26 percent, hate sites by16 percent, v= iolence by 7 percent, and "other" by 6 percent. [MORE]

'LATE FEE' RIP-OFFS HIT CONSUMERS, COLLEGE KIDS HARD
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- Don't even be a day late with your $12 Pep Boys payment, if you're a basic user of its charge card -- it will cost you $29. Be cert= ain to get your $5 Macy's payment in on time -- the company charges $25 if it's late. [MORE]

An AR Special Report
CROWN PRINCE SAID RESPONSIBLE FOR ROYAL MAS=
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, June 17, 2001 -- The great dramatist Shakespeare in King Richard III writes, "And my large kingdom for a little grave, an= [MORE]

Editorial: THE DEATH AND LIFE OF JOURNALISM
by Joe Shea

"Fatigue makes cowards of us all. It also makes it tough to sound coher= ent," the lettter from an old newspaper pal back East begins. After a long= [MORE]

On Native Ground: BUSH, GOP PLAY THE TAX CUT SHELL GAME
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So, what are you going to do with your rebate? The $600 that my wife and I are likely to get from President Bush's tax cuts ar= e enough to pay for the five cords of firewood we burn each year to heat th= e house. It might cover the next brake job I need on my 1997 Geo Metro, may= be with enough over for a set of tires. Or it could pay for replacing the r= otting parts of our back deck. [MORE]

Media Beat: PRAISE FOR PENTAGON PAPERS RINGS HOLLOW
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- When they challenged the power of the White House by= claiming the right to publish the Pentagon Papers, the nation's two most in= fluential newspapers took a laudable stand. During the three decades since then, praise for their journalistic courage has become a time-honored ritua= l in the media world. [MORE]

Make My Day: WILL YOU GO WITH ME?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Editor's Note: Because of a death in Erik'= s family, we are reprinting an earlier column. [MORE]

Momentum: THOU SHALT NOT KILL
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So, are you "healed" now? Have you found "closure"? Can you get back to your "normal life" now that Timothy McVeigh no longer walks (or sits in a jail cell) among us? Doesn't it feel good to= punish? Isn't revenge great? [MORE]

Ink Soup: 2 MP'S, ASAP
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Dr. Soup wishes to make two modest proposals to improv= e the quality of life. Historical note: The term modest proposal (MP to t= he trade) willrecall to literate readers the title of Jonathan Swift's essa= y suggestingthat hunger in his native Ireland be relieved by eating superfl= uouschildren. Note for the irony-challenged: He didn't mean it.[MORE]

O O O

An AR Exclusive: INDONESIA ARRESTS LEFT-LEANING SCHOLARS
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, June 12, 2001 1:25am (PDT) -- On a hot and humid afternoon last Friday, June 8, Giles Ji Ungpakorn sat inside a conference room and listened to a Japanese scholar speaking about the economic crisis and macroeconomic policies in Japan. A big, green rectangular table with some 80 people around it dominated the meeting room at a well-known resort in suburban Jakarta. [MORE]

An American Reporter Special Report
"Tim McVeigh's Day of Reckoning"

McVEIGH STAYS SILENT TO THE END

by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, June 11, 2001 -- Timothy McVeigh went to his death Monday= [MORE]

Media Beat: IN MEDIALAND, IT WAS TIME TO KILL
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Minutes after a federal judge ruled that the execution of Timothy McVeigh should proceed on June 11 as scheduled, CNN was airing live= [MORE]

Editorial: UPON THE DEATH OF TIMOTHY McVEIGH
by Joe Shea

As I write this morning, a blind man is speaking to the media in Oklahom= a City after the execution of Timothy McVeigh for the bombing of the Alfred= [MORE]

On Native Ground: WHO'S THE REAL ROGUE NATION?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We are the last remaining superpower. We dominate the= [MORE]

McVEIGH ENDS APPEALS PROCESS, PREPARES TO DIE
by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, June 7, 2001 -- A federal appeals court rejected Timothy McVeigh's bid for a stay of execution Thursday and the Oklahoma City bomber= [MORE]

Make My Day: MAYBE HE SHOULD HAVE SENT FLOWERS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Leave it to the British. With the exception of a few soccer hooligans and punk rockers, the British are well-known for their= [MORE]

Momentum: DEATH OF A JAZZMAN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It was December of 1997, I was sitting at a diner, I was waiting to interview jazz guitar master Attila Zoller, and I was nervou= s. Attila's lifelong dream -- a permanent home for his beloved Vermont Jaz= z Center, was coming true after 27 years. But I also knew that he was dyin= g. I'd seen him only a few months before, at a Sonny Rollins concert (he played with Rollins in the '50s), and he looked fine -- broad shoulders, bi= g grin, black captain's hat pulled low over his eyes. [MORE]

McVEIGH TRIAL JUDGE LETS EXECUTION DATE STAND
by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, June 6, 2001 -- The judge who heard Timothy McVeigh's bom= bing case said Wednesday it was "shocking" that the FBI had failed to turn over all evidence to the defendant, but he said there was nothing in thousa= nds of additional pages that were withheld that would keep McVeigh from dyi= ng as scheduled next Monday. [MORE]

Election 2001: L.A.
HAHN TIDE SWEEPS AWAY HOPE OF LATINO MAYOR FOR L.A.
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, July 6, 2001, 6:00am (PST) -- Many, many months ago, when the election that concluded today for Mayor of Los Angeles was still two years ahead, the smart money and the inside people at City Hall East - the modern building where city government has waited out a $350 million rehab of L.A.'s famed City Hall, just across Spring St. - put their money on tall, affable City Attorney James Hahn, the scion of a political dynasty that has enjoyed popular support in this city for half a century. This morning, two years and $13 million later, Hahn is Mayor-elect. [MORE]

On Native Ground: REP. MOAKLEY'S LAST MISSION WAS CLOSING THE 'SCHOOL OF ASSASSINS'
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- On the first of June, they buried Congressman Joe Moakley in his beloved hometown of South Boston. [MORE]

Editorial: MIKE WOO FOR CITY COUNCIL
by Joe Shea

The race for Hollywood's Los Angeles City Council seat has come down to two exceptional young men, former City Councilman Mike Woo and challenger Eric Garcetti, a prominent leader of Amnesty International and the son of former Los Angeles County District Atty. Gil Garcetti. [MORE]

Make My Day: FROM MMD THEATER, IT'S THE BARB AND JENNA SHOW
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind., June 1, 2001 -- {Editor's Note: In comments yesterday, the White House press office advised media to "think over very c= arefully" our treatment of what was termed a "private family matter" concer= ning the adventures of First Twins Barbara and Jenna Bush. Having given the= [MORE]

Editorial: VILLARAIGOSA FOR MAYOR OF LOS ANGELES
by Joe Shea

In this city of dreams, none burns brighter than that of AntonioVillarai= gosa. [MORE]

Media Beat: AT COMMENCEMENT, JOURNALISM HAS A HAZY FUTURE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Today, departing from an institution steeped in modernity,= [MORE]

Momentum: THE WIT AND WISDOM OF FRED EAGLESMITH
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If there was anyone left in Nashville with a brain, F= red Eaglesmith would be selling CDs by the millions. [MORE]

Ink Soup: WITH APOLOGIES TO EMILY
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- There are times when I consider Whitman to be the grea= test American poet. But then there are other days, and today is one of them= , when I am absolutely sure that it is Emily Dickinson. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: FOR GRADS, A BITE OF WIT, A TASTE OF WISDOM
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Row after row of graduates, dressed alik= e but not complaining about the dress code, assemble for the last time. Ea= ch waits in joyful -- almost giddy -- anticipation for the commencement cer= emony to get under way. [MORE]

In Solemn Memory
of

Richard Marsh, Paul Roberts and Phil Ruminski
and
All Our Honored Dead

Editorial
I AM NOT A HERO

by Joe Shea

When the time came to fight the Vietnam War and I was called up, I could not allow myself to be sworn into the armed services for the simplest of reasons: I could not kill another human being. [MORE]

On Native Ground: JAMES JEFFORDS AND THE VERMONT TRADITION OF INDEPE=
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Vermont Sen. James Jeffords has long had areputation for being a low-profile politician who rarely strays from themiddle of the road on most issues. [MORE]

Media Beat: SIMULATING DEMOCRACY CAN BE A VIRTUAL BREEZE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Few media eyebrows went up when the World Bank recently ca= nceled a global meeting set for Barcelona in late June -- and shifted it to= [MORE]

Make My Day: I ORDER YOU TO BE QUIET
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Regular readers of this column may not realize my= [MORE]

An AR Exclusive: PACHECO MADE ILLEGAL $10,000 LOAN TO PHONE BANK=
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, May 24, 2001 10:21am PDT -- Using campaign funds, Los Angel= es City Councilman Nick Pacheco made an illegal, interest-free, short-term $10,000 loan with no due date in February 2000 to La Colectiva, the politic= al phone bank operation that later made controversial phone calls attacking= [MORE]

Momentum: HEY, FRAT BOY! MEET THE GROUPIES
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As I was driving on a recent Spring weekend through H= anover, N.H., the home of Dartmouth College, I noticed that several of the fraternities were having outdoor parties. Crowds of young men and women mi= ngled happily on lawns with paper cups in their hands. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: THE HOME STRETCH
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Our own personal comfort zone isbuilt more by our associations than by anything we do to create it. [MORE]

On Native Ground: CONSERVATION IS SANE RESPONSE TO ENERGY SHORTAG=
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The first load of our wood supply for next winter arr= ived a few days ago. Our wood guy said he sold nearly 1,000 cords of wood l= ast winter, and could have sold double that if he had it. Because we're lon= g-time customers, he made sure we got our supply ahead of the folks who are= [MORE]

Make My Day: SOMETIMES LIFE JUST AIN'T FAIR, EH?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Earlier this week, I had a chance to spend a few days in Canada on business in Guelph, Ontario. I had a great time, and deci= ded that Canada is an excellent place to visit. The people are very friendl= y, the scenery is beautiful, and the towns are very clean and pretty safe. Oh, by the way, Guelph is pronounced "Gwelf," not"Goo-elf," as I found out.= [MORE]

Media Beat: FROM ITALY, HERE COMES 'MEDIA' DEMOCRACY
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Now that Italy's voters have given the job of prime minister to media magnate Silvio Berlusconi, others may wish to follow his example on this side of the Atlantic. [MORE]

Opinion: POLYGAMY TRIAL RAISES RIGHTS ISSUES
by Godfrey D. Lehman

SAN FRANCISCO -- Way down at the tag end of the Constitution in Article VI (the next to last) is a declaration just as clear -- and indisputable --= [MORE]

Momentum: THE UTTERLY DISPOSABLE FEMALE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Here's a riddle for you: What may be the most worthl= ess thing on the planet? The answer: An old woman -- unless it's a young gi= rl. And I'm sorry if you're been offended, but that's the unhappy conclusi= on I've drawn from a number of recent news stories. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: CLOSURE, FOR LACK OF A BETTER WORD
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Whether it's a school shooting, the Oklah= oma bombing, a suicide or a Volkswagen hitting and killing my teenaged son,= [MORE]

Ink Soup: THE TUNA DIALOGUES
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- My cat Huck has now reached, and even exceeded, the ag= e of discretion, and is, like all cats, naturally fond of philosophicaldisc= ussion. Too fond, as will appear below. [MORE]

AS INDONESIA AWAITS HER RISE, MEGAWATI'S RULE IS STUDIED
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, May 14, 2001 -- In late 1996, Megawati Sukarnoputri was a real loner, although perhaps not by choice. The authoritarian regime of President Suharto organized a bogus party congress and supported her opposition inside the Indonesian Democratic Party to topple her from its leadership. [MORE]

The American Reporter Wishes
Every Mom A

Happy Mother's Day!

Cindy Hasz: JONATHAN'S STORY

by Cindy Hasz

Blood clots like berries stuck in your hair. [MORE]

Happy Mother's Day!
Momentum: HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY, MOM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Although the mother-daughter relationship is grounded= [MORE]

REPORTS OF BREAK IN MUMIA CASE NOT BORNE OUT
American Reporter Staff

PHILADELPHIA, May 14, 2001 -- Reports circulating in Philadelphia, San F= rancisco and elsewhere that a major break is imminent in the case against b= lack journalist Abu-Mumia Jamal of Philadelphia, charged with the Dec. 9, 1= 981, murder of city policeman Daniel Faulkner, cannot be confirmed. [MORE]

On Native Ground: DECONSTRUCTING THE KENTUCKY DERBY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Maybe I think this because I love newspapers but it's= [MORE]

McVEIGH EXECUTION POSPONED DUE TO FBI SLIP-UP
by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, May 11, 2001 -- Timothy McVeigh, who had rejected any fur= ther appeals of his death penalty for the federal building bombing, was giv= en a 30-day stay of execution Thursday after the FBI revealed it had withhe= ld some evidence at his trial. [MORE]

FBI SAYS McVEIGH EVIDENCE WITHHELD
by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, May 10, 2001 -- The FBI informed a federal judge and Timo= thy McVeigh's defense attorneys Thursday it had found a quantity of evidenc= e in the Oklahoma City federal building bombing case that had never been re= vealed to McVeigh's lawyers. [MORE]

Make My Day: I'LL SELL YOU A BIG HOLE IN ARIZONA
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- How much does a hole in the ground cost? G= enerally they're free. When I was about nine years old, FreddieWalker, Mick= ey and Bobby Workman and I spent a week that summer digginga hole in Mickey= [MORE]

Media Beat
EXECUTING McVEIGH: THE MEDIA RITES OF RETRIBUTION
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON, May 10, 2001 -- For half a century, we've been watching ritu= als of retribution. Countless entertainment shows on TV have presented cert= ain vengeance as dramatic justice. In time for the last commercial, the des= ignated bad guys got what was coming to them. [MORE]

Ink Soup: PRAYER 101
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I am a week or two shy of the age of 72 -- patriarchal= [MORE]

An A.R. Special Report
"FIGHTING FMD"

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, May 5, 2001 -- A 1999 study by the University of California= [MORE]

Fighting FMD
THE FOOT & MOUTH DISEASE THREAT TO AMERICA: A R=
by Dr. Jack Woodall

RIO DE JANEIRO -- [Editor's Note: The author, founder of the acclaimed ProMED-mail tropical disease mailing list, may well be the world's foremost= [MORE]

Fighting FMD
EXPERTS DISAGREE ON BEST APPROACH TO OUTBREAK
American Reporter Staff

LOS ANGELES, May 5, 2001 -- Editor's Note: Responses to Jack Wood= all's proposal have varied from supportive to critical. Here are two respo= nses from state agriculture officials in North Carolina and Texas. [MORE]

On Native Ground: PUBLIC RADIO WAITS FOR A GREAT LEAP FORWARD =
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- At a time when newspapers, news magazines and tv news= [MORE]

Editorial: GET READY FOR 'PORN BARS'
by Joe Shea

A California liquor agency rule that prohibits bars from showingnon-obsc= ene porn films and photos is about to be repealed; now,neighborhoods across= [MORE]

Make My Day: I'VE GOT ALL MY TOES, TOO
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- For those of you who know me (and care), my wife,= [MORE]

Media Beat: APPARITIONS OF INNOCENCE IN VIETNAM
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Media commentators are split about Bob Kerrey and what hap= pened 32 years ago in the Vietnamese village of Thanh Phong. Some journalis= ts seem eager to exonerate the former senator. Others appear inclined to tu= rn him into a lightning rod for national guilt. [MORE]

Momentum: PICASSO'S PORN by Joyce Ma=
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What do performer Jennifer Lopez's nipples haveto do with Pablo Picasso? Give me a few minutes and I'll tell you. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: IF I WANT A POLICEMAN, I'LL DIAL 9-1-1
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- There are more policemen around than you= [MORE]

Opinion: WE HAVE MET THE ENEMY'S STOCK PORTFOLIO, AND IT IS OURS
by Jim Trageser

ESCONDIDO, Calif. -- It's weeks like those just past that we realiz= e what we may have missed in not electing Ralph Nader or Pat Buchanan to th= e White House. [MORE]

Ink Soup: 170 AND COUNTING
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- In two weeks from today, on May 16, we are going to k= ill Timothy J. McVeigh as a punishment for his having killed 169 people in the 1995 bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City. I say "we," fo= r whether you are opposed to capital punishment, as I am, or for it, it is we together who are going to take his life, sincethe executioner will be ou= r own federal government. [MORE]

KERREY & KERRY: TWO FACES OF VIETNAM
by Joe Shea

Former U.S. Sen. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska and Massachussetts U.S. Sen. Joh= n F. Kerry are two very different men despite their identical-sounding name= s, distinguished war records, honored Senate careers, famous ex-girlfriends= [MORE]

On Native Ground: LOOKING FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Are you as sick of hearing Ari Fleischer's voice as I= [MORE]

Media Beat: MEDIA SCRUTINY OF THE 'WHITE BLOC' IS OVERDUE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- As police fired rubber bullets through tear gas in Q= uebec City, many reporters echoed the claim that "free trade" promotes demo= cracy. Meanwhile, protesters struggled to shed light on a key fact: The pro= posed hemispheric trade pact would give large corporations even more power to override laws that have been enacted -- democratically -- to protect the= [MORE]

Make My Day: HOW DOES HE FEEL ABOUT STUNT DOUBLES?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Although I know people have differing views onwri= ters and our so-called contribution to society, I try to stay out ofthe fra= y, except to say that people who don't like writers aremouth-breathing goob= ers who watch too much pro wrestling. Other thanthat, I have no opinion. = But all that has changed thanks to an April 20 opinion column inthe online edition of The Globe & Mail, a big Canadian newspaper based inToronto (you can read it athttp://www.globeandmail.ca/gam/Film/20010420/RVSTRI8.html) = In an editorial whine-fest about the pending Hollywood strike bythe Writers= [MORE]

Momentum: LOVE ON A SMALL BOAT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- She was English, and her name was Clarice, which she pronounced "Claris," so that it sounded like the name of someone who was ve= ry clear on things. And Clarice was very clear on things. She was a pros= perous, intelligent, well-traveled woman of 87, who, although stooped, frai= l, and walking with a cane, expressed the strongest of opinions. [MORE]

LOS ANGELES MURDER RATE SHOOTS UP 100%? NOT!
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- An email news briefing distributed Wednesday by the Los A= ngeles Police Commission may have left some people thinking the City of Ang= els is becoming a city of carnage with a murder rate that has climbed 100 p= ercent in a single year. [MORE]

Ink Soup: RANDY THE BUILDER
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- We have been somehow adopted by a carpenter, a young f= ellow whose family origin, Texas, and last name, Walker, testify to his kin= ship to the current occupant of the White House. Since his father is somet= hing or other in local Democratic politics, the connection is not a thing t= hey willingly talk about, though, to his credit, he is not ashamed of it. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: FROM CORONA A PLACE TO CORONA A BEER: A BRIEF HISTORY=
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- At 12, we would snicker, "I wish I were= [MORE]

Editorial: CURING THE CHECHEN MADNESS
by Joe Shea

The internationalization of the Chechen conflict was dramatically brough= t home again Sunday when Chechen gunmen seized a Swiss-owned luxury hotel i= n Istanbul; after tense hours of standoff, 13 Chechen "soldiers" were taken= [MORE]

TV-TURNOFF WEEK TURNS ME ON
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- It's been nearly 35 years now since I left my parents' home= [MORE]

INSTEAD OF BLAMING NADER, DEMOCRATS SHOULD HEED HIM
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The first 100 days of the George W. Bushadministratio= n have certainly been no surprise, unless you actuallybelieved all that "co= mpassionate conservative" nonsense that he wasspouting on the campaign trai= l. [MORE]

Media Beat: BIAS AND FEAR TILT COVERAGE OF ISRAEL
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- When the New York Times finally printed the name of= [MORE]

TITLE INFLATION
Walter M. Brasch

HARRISBURG, Pa. -- It took two directors, two executive producers, three= [MORE]

Ink Soup: ICHIRO, KAZU, AND I
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The Mariners baseball team boasts not one but two open= ly Japanese players, both of whom have captured the hearts of all fans,incl= uding this one, and compensated to a degree for the defection of A-Rod (Mr. Alex Rodriguez to his household staff), who has elected, onhis agent's advi= ce, to join some team in Arlington, Texas, wherever thatis. Judging by th= e litter-strewn field on which they disgrace the national pastime, it would= [MORE]

On Native Ground: A SECRET TRADE PACT EVEN WORSE THAN NAFTA
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If you thought the North American Free Trade Agreemen= t (NAFTA) was a disaster, its sequel -- the Free Trade Agreement of the Ame= ricas (FTAA) -- promises to be even worse. [MORE]

Media Beat: IF THE E-3 AFFAIR HAPPENED HERE
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- One of the ways to test for media slant is to put th= e shoe on the other foot. A big story this month provides an opportunity fo= r inquiry in the world of intense media spin. [MORE]

On Native Ground: IS IT TOO LATE TO STOP GLOBAL WARMING? =
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As I write this, in the first week of April,it's hard= [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: HIGH PROFILE CASES SHINE A LIGHT, CAST SHADOWS =
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This isn't about voting, right and wrong -- al= though at the time that was the big story. It's about what we knownow beca= use we listened then. [MORE]

Monentum: 'FRIENDS' MAY BE OUR ENEMY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Selling out used to be something to be ashamed of. No= w, if you don't sell out, it just means that no one wants to buy what you h= ave. [MORE]

DIVIDING AMOEBAE GET A HELPING HAND - OR FOOT
by Mark Perew

SANATA ANA, Calif., March 22, 2001 -- Beatles aren't the only critters who can sing, "I get by with a little help from my friends." An amoeba in the act of dividing into two amoebae can get stuck, too. [MORE]

SHEA HAILED BY L.A.P.D. CHIEF FOR 'COMMITMENT TO LEADERSHIP' American Reporter Staff
American Reporter Staff

LOS ANGELES, March 20, 2001 -- In rare praise for any political candidate, the Los Angeles Police Dept. today officially commended American Reporter Editor-in-Chief Joe Shea, a candidate for Mayor of Los Angeles in the city's April 10 primary election, for his "commitment to leadership" in calling for other mayoral candidates to leave any decision on thefuture of Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks out of their political comments. [MORE]

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

Hominy & Hash: GR=

by Constance Dunn Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Imagine! After over sixdecades of being p= roud I was born Irish in America, I discover I don't know a tinker's damn a= bout being Irish at all, and yet I can't imagine a life as anything but Iri= sh. [MORE]

On Native Ground: THE DEMOCRATS: DEAD PARTY WALKING
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The Republican rout is on. [MORE]

Make My Day: WHOSE FINGER IS THAT?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- People who know me know that I have an interest i= n things related to construction and woodworking. I enjoy learning about ne= w advances in those areas, and I'm willing to try just about anything as lo= ng as the end result isn't an electrical shock or explosion. [MORE]

Media Beat: BAD NEWS BEARS CHANGE TONE OF MEDIA SCRIPT
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- When the Ameritrade company launched a $200 millionmarke= ting drive to explain the joys of online trading in autumn 1999, abarrage o= f TV commercials invited viewers to join in the fun. The news wasbullish, a= nd the firm's motto -- "Believe in yourself" -- provided anupbeat message. Tech stocks led advances in self-affirmation. [MORE]

LEIGH STEINBERG HAS A TAKE...ON EVERYTHING
by Steven Travers

SAN FRANCISCO -- Editor's Note: Steven Travers has workedwit= h superagent Leigh Steinberg to help develop the Sports Movie Channel. Rec= ently, Travers and Steinberg talked about sports, Hollywood, theInternet, a= nd how the 21st Century will be connected by all of them. [MORE]

American Sports
PRINCE RICHARD COULD SNAP THE CURVE BALL
by Steven Travers

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- He grew up next to Steve Lavin in Marin, h= as worked the craft of acting all over the world, and now he is aheartthrob= [MORE]

AN A.R. CORRESPONDENT GOES BEFORE THE U.S. SUPREME COURT
by Thomas S. Kerrigan

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 28, 2001 -- Bundled up in a scarf and overcoat as I walked along Capitol Hill early Monday morning from my hotel -- Washington, D.C. is cold in February; there had been snow on the ground the day I arrived -- I went over my notes once more in my mind and wondered whether all the weeks of study and research had prepared for mefor the appearance that was only a few hours away, an appearance that was becoming more and more momentous in my mind. [MORE]

Copyright 2007 Joe Shea The American Reporter. All Rights Reserved.

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