RECENT ARTICLES

Vol. 14, No. 3,360 - The American Reporter - February 15, 2008



Brasch Words
CHENEY'S REFRAIN? 'I'M A BELIEVER'
by Walter Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- It's hard to believe that Vice-President Dick Cheney believes in Constitutional rights - at least after all that he and his protégé, President George W. Bush, have done to the American people in the past five years. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
MY PREFERENCES AND OPINIONS (OFF THE RECORD)
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Do I think it's wonderful to see women delivering the sports scores with the play-by-play as well? And do I love seeing the ups, downs and probabilities of the stock market announced by a cookie-cutter analyst from her desk on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange? [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
IN NEPAL, JOURNALISTS LIVE UNDER CONSTANT THREAT
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

LONDON, Oct. 30, 2005 -- Nepalese journalists have been living under heavy censorship, subject to mass arrests, threats and intimidation since the coup of King Gyanendra on Feb. 1 of this year. [MORE]

Eye On The Hurricane
MEDIA GONE MISSING; IT'S AL ROKER OR NOTHING IN SOUTH FLORIDA
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., Oct. 30, 2005 -- "After Al Roker fell down, the national story was over. It's as simple as that." [MORE]

On Media
NOVEL COVERAGE OF THE LIBBY SCANDAL FROM THE WEB
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, October 31, 2005 -- For four and a half days, it seemed like media slapstick rather than serious discussion. But then, at 2 p.m. Friday, October 28, everything changed. In what may turn out to be a historic demarcation, Patrick Fitzgerald's press conference represented the first real blow against an administration's arrogant lies. Whether it turns out to be the return of Watergate remains to be seen, but for now we have a start. [MORE]

Free Speech
ARE THE DEMOCRATS BIG ENOUGH TO WIN?
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- Mr. Chairman, today we are reading fantastic poll numbers from AOL and other places that surely ought to revive our hopes and renew our determination to take back dozens of Congressional and Senate seats this year, and the White House three years from now. [MORE]

Make My Day
NOW ISN'T THAT IRONIC?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Irony is one of those problem words that everyone thinks they know what it means, but don't. I'm not even totally clear on the concept myself, even though it's a writing tool I use all the time. [MORE]

On Native Ground
'GALBRAITH'S CURE:' HOW TO AVOID CIVIL WAR IN IRAQ
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As former Ambassador Peter W. Galbraith sees it, the United States faces a choice in Iraq. [MORE]

Momentum
THE BRAVE WIDOWS OF SOUTH FLORIDA
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- About a year and a half ago, my stepfather died at the age of 87. Ever since then, my mother has been getting old. [MORE]

American Opinion
IT'S TIME FOR MEDICAL WHISTLEBLOWERS TO COME IN FROM THE COLD
by James J. Murtagh Jr., M.D.

ATLANTA -- "The Constant Gardener" proves once again that John le Carré is the master not just of spy novels, but also of the most basic human drives - and a keen observer of the central moral problems of our times. [MORE]

Free Speech
STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT THE BIRD FLU
by Congressman Michael C. Burgess

WASHINGTON, October 26, 2005 -- Mr. BURGESS. Mr. Speaker, I just wanted to take a minute this evening to talk about something that has been in the news a lot lately, and something that this Congress is going to be dealing with more and more as the next several months go by, and that is a discussion about the avian flu, or the so-called bird flu. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A SMILE ON HIS FACE AND A SHINE ON HIS SHOES
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- His business card read W. L. (Bill) Dunn but my mother called him Len and we called him Papa. I thought I knew him well. As the youngest, he had a little more time to dote on me than on the others growing up during the earning and yearning years. [MORE]

Brasch Words
WASHINGTON INSPIRES THE SCARIEST COSTUMES YET
by Walter Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- It's almost Halloween, and some of our nation's leaders have yet to find appropriate costumes. [MORE]

Eye On The Hurricane
WAITING FOR WILMA
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Oct. 24, 2005, 1:44m EST -- The porch furniture is piled high in the living room, the refrigerator is stocked with cold cuts, the cooler is packed with ice, every appropriate container is full of fresh water, and all the flashlights and the portable radios are ready to go. Now all we need is a storm. [MORE]

On Media
AFTER JUDITH MILLER, A SECOND LOOK AT CONFIDENTIALITY
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- That reporters have some sacred right to shield the identities of their sources is one of those assertions that cries out for reevaluation. It is possible to make a case that certain classes of reportorial activities ought to be deserving of that privilege, but that others, including that of Judith Miller, probably should not. [MORE]

Andy Oram Reports
WHY THEY'RE TALKING ABOUT INTERNET GOVERNANCE
by Andy Oram

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- It's an unlikely matter for the United States and other nations to lock horns over: the administration of names and numbers used to reach Internet sites. [MORE]

Make My Day
RULES OF DATING: WILL YOU... UHH... DO YOU WANT TO...?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Believe it or not, I wasn't always the suave, sophisticated, debonair guy I am now. So it's not too surprising that I never dated much in high school. It wasn't for lack of interest or even lack of trying. Believe me, I was very interested. And I tried as much, if not more, than any normal teenage boy did at that age. [MORE]

On Native Ground
'MISS RUN AMOK' TAKES DOWN THE NEW YORK TIMES
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If you read the belated account of the Judith Miller affair in this past Sunday's New York Times, you received confirmation of the biggest problem in journalism - reporters who compromise their independence in exchange for access. [MORE]

Momentum
'MILLER TIME:' AN ANGER THAT'S HARD TO BEAR
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- With all the tragedy we've had this year, Katrina and Iraq and Pakistan and Alstead, N.H., et al, nothing has angered me more than the case of The New York Times reporter Judith Miller. [MORE]

Passings
BILL KING WORE A CROWN AMONG SPORTS BROADCASTERS
by Steve Travers

SAN FRANCISCO -- sports broadcaster Bill King was as much a part of my life as my friends and family. I grew up with him. [MORE]

American Opinion
IS IT ABOUT ILLEGALS, OR RACE?
by Patrick Osio, Jr.

LOS ANGELES -- Are there still some Americans who believe that the immigration issues on our southern border are primarily about national security? Or that statements calling for defending "national sovereignty" are due to fears we are losing our nation's independence? Fortunately, evidence indicates that those of such mind are a small minority, but are capable of attracting the most media attention. [MORE]

Market Mover
G.M. AND FORD NEED A HENRY J
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Oct. 19, 2005 -- The sarcastic joke has become reality: General Motors and Ford are large health care and pension companies which happen to make some automobiles and trucks. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WHAT DID HE SAY? WHAT DID HE MEAN?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- In 1984, I took a class at the University of Pittsburgh along with students half my age and learned to read into Presidential speeches what was meant by the words in the context of the times. [MORE]

Editorial
THE JUDITH MILLER CASE
by Joe Shea

The American Reporter took a unique approach to the Judith Miller case, in which a Federal judge in the Valerie Plame investigation ordered her jailed for refusing to testify regarding her sources, to whom she had promised anonymity. [MORE]

The Right Side
SOUTHERN CONSERVATIVES FEEL ABANDONED AS G.O.P. MOVES LEFT
by Nathan Tabor

KERNERSVILLE, N.C. -- "Daddy was a veteran, a Southern Democrat; they oughta get a rich man to vote like that." [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT ABOUT COOTCHIE-COOTCHIE COO?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- While most new parents are eager to show off their new baby, and positively beam when people coo at and marvel over their newest family member, one hospital in Halifax, Scotland is putting a stop to all that. [MORE]

Dungeons of Debt
BEST BUY AND DAIRY QUEEN ARE MISSING THE BIG SOMETHING
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- There are some companies, and some ideas, that have outlived their usefulness. Best Buy is one, Dairy Queen is another. Let me tell you why. [MORE]

Market Mover
NO NEWS IS BAD NEWS FOR SOLDIER FAMILIES
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Oct. 15, 2005 -- In reading some of the blogs of friends and families of troops in Iraq, I noticed consternation lately about the lack of phone calls from the troops in recent weeks, and paucity of news coverage outside of Baghdad. [MORE]

On Native Ground
MORE DEADLY THAN 9/11: THE COMING BIRD FLU PANDEMIC
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- For all the talk about "homeland security" in the four years since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, our nation has been woefully unprepared in many areas. Nowhere is this more evident than in the area of public health. [MORE]

Momentum
BRINGING HORSE SENSE TO POLITICS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Seeing the breathtaking "Cavalia," the Cirque-du-Soliel-type show with horses in Boston a few weeks ago, made me think somewhat wistfully about the confluence of art and politics. [MORE]

On Media
LESSONS FROM THE PAST IN 35MM
by Robert Gelfand

SACILE, Italy, Oct. 12, 2005 -- The opening weekend of the world's most prestigious silent film festival was as dated as the 20th Century and as current as the latest fight over Wal-Mart. As in other historical studies, we begin to discover things from our past that help us to better understand our own lives. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
INDOORS, THE SAME; OUTDOORS, TWO DIFFERENT WORLDS
Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It's not uncommon for one of our older children to speak of ordinary family happenings only to have one of the younger ones say, "I wasn't born yet." [MORE]

Brasch Words
'ALWAYS THERE': THE VOICE OF A GOLD STAR MOTHER
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- Laura Bush was at the Colonial Fire Hall in Hamilton, N.J., telling 700 pre-selected ticket-holding Bush faithful why they needed to vote for her husband. [MORE]

Make My Day
I KNEW THAT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- As a self-proclaimed Know-It-All, I am in the enviable position of being able to demonstrate my vast knowledge on a wide array of topics, like how Benjamin Frankton invented the kite, or how Ora and Wilfred Right were the first to fly an airplane across the Pacific Ocean to France. [MORE]

On Native Ground
TODAY'S GOP IS HOME TO CRONIES AND CORRUPTION
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Few tears are being shed for House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, who was deservedly indicted in Texas for money laundering and conspiring to violate campaign finance laws. [MORE]

Momentum
BRATTLEBORO UNDER GLASS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- That creative economy symposium a few weeks ago opened up a floodgate of discussion about the future of our area, and I've been proud to contribute a few columns of ideas - although I must say, given some of those phone calls and letters, you people might want to retire that "Hate has no home here" bumper sticker. [MORE]

Media Beat
TORTURE AND THE ARC OF INJUSTICE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Several decades ago, "controversial" subjects in news media included many issues that are now well beyond controversy. During the first half of the 1960s, fierce arguments raged in print and on the airwaves about questions like: Does a black person (a "Negro," in the language of the day) have the right to sit at a lunch counter, or stay at a hotel, the same way that a white person does? Should the federal government insist on upholding such rights all over the country? [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
HYPOTHETICALLY SPEAKING
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- And now the hype begins. Hurricane Stan is a little old tropical storm. Overnight, a tropical storm dubbed Stan made landfall in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula with 45 mph sustained winds. The ever-watchful forecasters predict it will weaken to a tropical depression as it moves in over the region. [MORE]

On Media
NO WONDER EDITORIAL WRITERS DON'T SIGN THEIR NAMES
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, October 3, 2005 -- I thought I'd seen just about everything, but then my local newspaper published an editorial rooting for Tom Delay to make a comeback. Maybe there's a reason editorials are left unsigned. [MORE]

Make My Day
WARNING: TOP SECRET COLUMN
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I wanted to be a spy when I was a kid. I wanted to drive around in cool cars, wear sharp suits, drink vodka martinis, and have beautiful women throw themselves at me, a la James Bond. After I watched my first Bond movie, I was convinced of the awesome power of suits and vodka martinis. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE MYTH OF COMPETENCE IN THE BUSH WHITE HOUSE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Do you remember how, right after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, we heard all the pundits talk about how great it was that we finally had grownups in charge of our government in a time of crisis? [MORE]

Momentum
HOW A CREATIVE ECONOMY CAN CREATE COMMUNITY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There was a time when I thought creativity was for writers, painters, musicians and other artists. And then there was business. [MORE]

American Opinion
MY L.B.J. DIVIDEND
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, N.Y. -- If you spend your life as a writer, you're always concerned about who's reading and whether they're hearing what you thought you were saying. [MORE]

Media Beat
MEDIA'S MEA CULPAS BEGIN TO WEAR THIN
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Dan Rather caused some ripples when he spoke at a law school in New York on Sept. 19 and warned that politicians have been putting effective pressure on the corporate owners of major broadcast outlets. Summarizing his remarks, the Hollywood Reporter said that the former CBS anchor contended "there is a climate of fear running through newsrooms stronger than he has ever seen in his more than four-decade career." [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
DIVERSITY IS WHO WE ARE: HEAD START AND THE FAITH-BASED INITIATIVES
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It was in Cleveland, Ohio, 1961, that our Jack climbed aboard the temple van to start "school," or so he called it. It was nursery school. To him, he became a big boy that day, going out into the world. He would be learning things, like colors and how to use them; shapes and dimensions, sounds and textures. [MORE]

On Media
THE NEW YORK TIMES DISAPPOINTS ONLINE READERS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Sept. 26, 2005 -- The New York Times shocked and outraged its fans last week by announcing a plan to charge for its internet services. The Times gladdened its critics, angered its online readers and simultaneously underscored one essential quandary facing internet businesses. [MORE]

Make My Day
YEAH? WELL, I DOUBLE DARE YOU!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I don't know what it is with teenagers these days. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE FAITH-BASED ECONOMY IS ABOUT TO MEET REALITY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We keep hearing statistics about how well the American economy is doing and how it is growing, creating new jobs and shrugging off high energy prices. [MORE]

American Opinion
THE FOX AT THE HENHOUSE: WHITE HOUSE INVESTIGATES ITS ROLE IN KATRINA
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, N.Y. -- Either President George W. Bush just doesn't get it, or he just doesn't care, or he thinks the people he serves are all gullible morons. [MORE]

Eye On The Hurricane
AS RITA ROARS IN, TRAFFIC CRAWLS OUT; 20 DIE WHEN BUS LOADED WITH ELDERLY EVACUEES EXPLODES; POLICE TURNED BACK REFUGEES FROM NEW ORLEANS AT GUNPOINT, PAPER SAYS
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Sept. 23, 2005 (8:57am EST) -- As Hurricane Rita's 140-m.p.h. winds roared closer to Houston and points east, west and north, motorists sweltering in 99-degree heat crawled out of the region in a 100-mile-long traffic jam along Interstate 10 and other highways even after Texas Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst promised on a radio talk show that all lanes would be opened in the same direction on a list of five highways, including I-10, and that gas tankers would resupply stranded motorists. [MORE]

Momentum
ARTISTS AND AFFORDABLE HOUSING
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "Affordable housing" is a jargon term that puts most people, including me, to sleep. Affordable to who? Isn't all housing affordable to somebody? [MORE]

American Opinion
AMERICAN PRESS OFFERS HIGH PRAISE, HARSH CRITICISM FOR EGYPT'S ELECTION
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, N.Y. -- Was the recent Egyptian presidential election in which voters retained President Hosni Mubarak a "shameless sham" or "a first step" to democracy and "an event to be saluted?" It depends on the American newspaper that writes about it. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
TRUTHFULLY, NOW: WHAT HAPPENED TO MAJORITY RULE?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When Congress okayed adding the words "under God" to our pledge of allegiance to the flag, at the strong urging of President Dwight David Eisenhower, they were not doing it for the "religious right" - we didn't have a "religious right," we only had us, Americans. [MORE]

On Media
IS IT THE L.A. TIMES, OR A RANSOM NOTE?
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Sept. 19, 2005 -- Media criticism tends to concentrate on message content, but visual style is also critically important in holding the reader's interest. This is where the Los Angeles Times needs to learn how to be less imaginative. [MORE]

Make My Day
I CAN EVEN USE A POWER SAW
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Ever since we moved into our house 11 years ago, I've enjoyed working on it. Building and insulating the walls, putting up drywall, and watching my wife paint. [MORE]

Media Beat
MEDIA KNOCK BUSH - AND PROP HIM UP
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- This month we've heard a lot of talk about journalists who got tough with President Bush. And it's true that he has been on the receiving end of some fiercely negative media coverage in the wake of the hurricane. But the mainstream U.S. press is ill-suited to challenging the legitimacy of the Bush administration. [MORE]

On Native Ground
CONSERVATIVES FAIL THE TEST OF GOVERNANCE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President Bush did something this week that he rarely ever does. He took responsibility for one of his many failures. [MORE]

Momentum
THE GENTRIFICATION OF BRATTLEBORO
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When I first moved here, Vermont was similar to the Third World countries I had been living in for years in South and Central America. It was cheap, difficult to survive in, and very, very beautiful. That was fine with me, because I wanted a quiet place to write and wasn't sure I'd ever make any money at it. [MORE]

An AR Special Report
'UNACCEPTABLE': THE FEDERAL RESPONSE TO HURRICANE KATRINA
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- In late afternoon of Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2005, the National Weather Service began tracking a tropical depression in the Atlantic about 175 miles southeast of the Bahamas. Moving quickly, it turned west and crossed into southern Florida two days later as a Category 1 hurricane, bringing with it almost a foot of rain. [MORE]

American Opinion
HUMAN RIGHTS 'REPORT CARD' REVEALS HIGH PRICE OF SECRECY
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, N.Y. -- During 2004, the Bush Administration issued more secret court orders, spent $148 creating new classified documents for every $1 spent releasing old ones, invoked the "state secrets" privilege in court cases more frequently than ever before, and received 25 per cent more requests for documents under the Freedom of Information Act. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
CASTING ASPERSIONS
by Constance Daley

OTTERBEIN, Ind. - Over Labor Day weekend, I started writing a letter to my unborn granddaughter due the Ninth of September. I had written such for her older sister and now it was time for Abbie Rose to have some wisdom of the ages passed along. She has my genes, we have shared DNA, so why not my philosophies, my ethics? [MORE]

On Media
WHAT KATRINA CAN TEACH US
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Sept. 12, 2005 -- Even as we study the Hurricane Katrina debacle, there are lessons that go unheeded. Mismanagement of government agencies is a serious problem which the media and the elected leadership have failed to address. It is a curiously bipartisan problem with sometimes lethal consequences. [MORE]

The American Reporter
Remembers With Deepest Sorrow
The Victims Of Sept. 11, 2001

Remembering 9/11
THE LESSONS OF SEPT. 11

by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Sept. 11, 2003 -- Editor's Note: This article was first published on the second anniversary of Sept. 11 in the Hard News café blog. [MORE]

Remembering 9/11
FOR MANY, POST-9/11 IS ERA OF MANIPULATION
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Traveling from New York City in late Sept., 2001, on a pre-scheduled book tour, author Joan Didion spoke with audiences in several cities on the West Coast. [MORE]

Remembering 9/11
THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION'S 'GONG SHOW' NEEDS ITS STAR
byRonKenner

HOLLYWOOD, Sept. 11, 2005 -- Maybe the nation at large is indeed getting a wake-up call from the media - just in case the hurricane wind chime in Louisiana didn't do it. [MORE]

Remembering 9/11
WHY DON'T WE HEAR THE WARNINGS?
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- In a flurry of speeches and appearances over the past two weeks, President George W. Bush has commemorated the Dec. 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and V-J Day with remarks that include a discussion of Sept. 11. The President noted the "surprise" element of both attacks but failed to mention the timely warnings that could have profoundly mitigated the destruction in Hawaii and New York. [MORE]

Make My Day
I'LL JUST TAKE THE BUS INSTEAD
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. - I've become quite the aficionado of GPS (Global Positioning System) devices over the past year or so. I used to look down my nose at GPS users, because I thought they were incapable of reading a real map. That all changed when I used a GPS on several long car trips. [MORE]

American Essay
IS AMERICA AT THE END OF GREATNESS?
by Ahmed Bouzid

HERNDON, Va. -- First it was Abu Ghraib; now it's Katrina. [MORE]

Eye On The Hurricane
MERCIFUL JOURNEY: OBSERVATIONS ON DISASTER
by Mark Scheinbaum

D'IBERVILLE, Miss., Sept 10, 2005 -- Some disasters are best viewed at a wide-angle, by stepping back, breathing deeply and reflecting. Some tragedies are revealed best by narrow spotlights of truth, serving as examples of the whole. Hurricane Katrina in sheer scope of devastation defies both methods. [MORE]

Dungeons Of Debt
BLOOD ON THE TRACKS: CITIGROUP PRODS CLIENTS TO BANKRUPTCY
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- When I missed two weeks of work due to visiting my brother on his deathbed and then going to his funeral a week later, I also missed paying - for the first time in three years - my ATT Universal Card payment. Even though I made $644 in payments - the amount they requested in a follow-up bill - to ATT/Citicards (Citigroup owns ATT Universal Card) before the next payment was due, they sent my account to a collection agency that has harassed me ever since. [MORE]

On Native Ground
HOW THE BUSH LEAGUE LET NEW ORLEANS DIE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President George W. Bush says he plans to investigate what went wrong with the federal government's response to the devastation in New Orleans and the Gulf Coast from Hurricane Katrina. [MORE]

Momentum
STRONG WIND
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "Strong wind, strong wind. Many dead tonight it could be you. And we are homeless, homeless. Moonlight sleeping on a midnight lake.1" [MORE]

Eye On The Hurricane
AN UNFEELING PRESIDENT SHOULD BE HELD ACCOUNTABLE
by Carla Binion

FORT WORTH, Tex. -- The novelist E. L. Doctorow once said of President George W. Bush, "He is the president who does not feel. He does not feel for the families of the dead, he does not feel for the 35 million of us who live in poverty." [MORE]

Media Beat
FIRING F.E.M.A. CHIEF IS NOT ENOUGH
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Calls for firing Michael Brown are understandable. Aptly described as "the blithering idiot in charge of FEMA" by New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd a few days ago, he's an easy and appropriate target. [MORE]

American Opinion
SECURE BORDERS, OPEN DOORS
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, N.Y. -- As Congress returns to Washington facing what promises to be a rancorous debate on how to protect U.S. borders, a leading immigration think-tank is charging that U.S. visa policies - a key tool in promoting national security - are in danger of compromising American economic competitiveness and foreign policy goals. [MORE]

Eye On The Hurricane
WILL OTHER NATIONS HELP? YES, IF BUSH LETS THEM
by Courtney Stewart

BOSTON -- Is President George W. Bush too proud to accept international charity? [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
POET FOR THE MINIONS, POET FOR THE MASSES
Constance Daley

WARWICK, N.Y. - As a nation, we have been so enamored of the words of Emma Lazarus, the 19th Century Jewish poet and literary figure, that we forget the lines themselves, engraved on a brass plaque affixed to the Statue of Liberty. We are such a warm-hearted people, we think of ourselves as kind and welcoming - but for some reason, this current generation of movers and shakers are saying enough is enough. [MORE]

Ode To The Drowned City
WHEN THE SAINTS COME MARCHIN' IN
by Joe Shea

SIESTA KEY, Fla., Sept. 4, 2005 -- Tonight at sunset I took a long drive after Mass down to Turtle Beach at the end of Midnight Pass Road on Siesta Key. The bright orange wafer of the Sun was just falling below the rim of the Gulf of Mexico, and as I always try to do, I looked up at the shape of the sparse few clouds in the fading blue sky and wondered whose souls they were. [MORE]

On Media
A CITY'S DESTRUCTION INTERPRETED BY MODERN SCRIBES
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Sept. 4, 2005 -- Let the recriminations begin. The destruction of New Orleans, a disaster of biblical proportions, is rightly worthy of careful analysis. The good news is that the beginnings of real thought are starting to emerge. The bad news from the media standpoint - and there is plenty of it - includes multiple failures of capability and intent. [MORE]

American Essay
WAITING FOR THE TALKING POINTS
by Ahmed Bouzid

WASHINGTON -- A deafening silence haunts the American conservative echo chamber. [MORE]

Breaking News
'FIVE OR SIX' ARMED MEN ON BRIDGE SHOT DEAD BY NEW ORLEANS POLICE
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Sept. 4, 2005, 5:08pm EDT -- The Associated Press reported minutes ago that five or six people in a group of eight men, all armed, were shot to death by police on a highway bridge over the Industrial Canal in the city, MSNBC reported. [MORE]

Make My Day
YOU THINK YOUR ROAD TRIPS ARE LONG?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- "No, we're not there yet." [MORE]

On Native Ground
EXITING IRAQ
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Thanks to Cindy Sheehan's single-handed siege of Crawford, Tex., we now have an antiwar movement. [MORE]

Momentum
ALMOST A MILLION-DOLLAR BABY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In the end, it came down to a racehorse's heart. [MORE]

American Opinion
IS ANYONE LISTENING?
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, NY -- On Sept. 11, 2001, a New York City police helicopter hovered above the World Trade Center. Two minutes earlier, the first of the Twin Towers had collapsed. It would be 21 minutes before the second tower was to collapse. [MORE]

Brasch Words
BUSH BY THE NUMBERS
by Walter Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- President George W. Bush likes numbers. A day after he received 50.7 percent of the vote in the 2004 general election, he decided he had a mandate. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A SHOCK IS A SHOCK
by Constance Daley

ST SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. - A shock is a shock. Your finger in a light socket, that's a shock. A person with a backpack blows himself up in front of your eyes, that's a shock. Are they the same? Well, in the sense that neither can be undone, they're the same. You can resolve never to put your finger in a socket again but the human being trained to sacrifice himself for a cause - and the cause is killing others, that is something you can't control with your will. [MORE]

Breaking News
BIG EASY'S IMAGE AS CESSPOOL MAY SOON BE REALIZED, EXPERTS SAY
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Aug. 28, 2005, 11pm EST -- A city known for more than a century as a place of alcoholic excess, amoral attitudes, sexual abandon and political corruption - and as the birthplace of jazz - is about to become a "vast cesspool" of toxic chemicals, floating garbage, human waste and coffins, news reports say, as Hurricane Katrina's 160 mph winds approach the city from the Gulf of Mexico as a Category 5 storm. [MORE]

On Media
DAILIES DROP THE BALL ON HURRICANE STORY
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Aug. 28, 2005 -- The fact that newspapers have lost at least one critical race with the electronic media was made crystal clear today. Neither the Los Angeles Times nor the Daily Breeze saw fit to run the Hurricane Katrina story on its front page. The Times at least managed to run a photo of motorists waiting in line to get gasoline as nervous New Orleans residents began to evacuate their city. [MORE]

Make My Day
LORD OF THE FISH
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Friday, August 12 - We made it! After a 20-hour drive from Indiana, we made it to Red Lake, Ontario for our annual fly-in fishing trip. Each summer, we spend a week up in Northwest Ontario, eating, fishing, smoking cigars, telling jokes, and enjoying the scenery and moderate weather, and maybe drinking a beer or two. Between us. All week long. I swear. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WHY NE0-CONS HATE VETERANS AND GOLD STAR MOTHERS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The easiest way to judge a person's reputation is to see who their enemies are and what they are saying. [MORE]

Campaign Florida
SEN. NELSON, IN FLA., TALKS OF 'EVENTUALLY' LEAVING IRAQ
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Aug. 24, 2005 -- U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson of Fl;orida told a town hall audience here Wednesday that the Bush Administration ought to set deadlines for "eventually" leaving Iraq and defended his vote for the war, saying "I was not told the truth" about weapons of mass destruction and Iraqi drones that war planners told him would unleash "biological warfare" over the United States. [MORE]

Momentum
A STRIP MALL BACK IN TIME
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In my area the local strip mall, called Putney Road, is a useful mess of chain fast food restaurants, car washes and curb cuts. Ugly does not begin to describe it, and everybody knows it. [MORE]

Media Beat
BLAMING THE antiwar MESSENGERS
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The surge of antiwar voices in U.S. media this month has coincided with new lows in public approval for what pollsters call President Bush's "handling" of the Iraq war. After more than two years of a military occupation that was supposed to be a breeze after a cakewalk into Baghdad, the war has become a clear PR loser. But an unpopular war can continue for a long time - and one big reason is that the military-industrial-media complex often finds ways to blunt the effectiveness of its most prominent opponents. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
POCKET-SIZED SECURITY
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When we die, we're dead, deceased. We have expired. We have breathed our last breath. We'll leave it to those checking identification on our person to communicate that news to our loved ones. Perhaps, there was a glitch in the security geared to protect our lives and limbs; or, perhaps, we are hit by the proverbial truck. But at that point, we are truly out of the picture. [MORE]

On Media
SONGS OF TREASON FILL THE AIR
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The word "treason" has been bandied about recently by both the Left and the Right. Whether considered in its literal or figurative sense, the word has seldom been so misused. [MORE]

Make My Day
YOU'VE GOT A THING HANGING ...
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Quick, check the mirror. You've got something in your teeth. [MORE]

On Native Ground
A MOTHER'S GRIEF AND A PRESIDENT'S ARROGANCE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- He's had time to go fishing, to go on a two-hour bike ride, to watch a Little League baseball game, to take naps, catch up on his reading and go to Republican fund-raisers. [MORE]

American Opinion
DIPLOMATIC ASSURANCES: WORTHLESS
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, NY -- Countries that rely on "diplomatic assurances" that other countries won't torture transferred prisoners "are either engaging in wishful thinking or using the assurances as a figleaf to cover their complicity," a new report from Human Rights Watch charges. [MORE]

Breaking News
DRAMATIC SCENES FROM GAZA AS SETTLERS BATTLE ISRAELI ARMY
by Joe Shea

THE GAZA STRIP (Reporting from Bradenton, Fla., Aug. 18, 2005, 12:14pm EST) -- The last desperate battle for Gaza between Israeli settlers and the Israeli Army is unfolding now in dramatic scenes fom the Gaza Strip on CNN. [MORE]

Momentum
COVERED IN MUD, AND LOVIN' IT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Here's a confession for you: the more dangerous the world becomes, the more I like gossip. [MORE]

American Opinion
LATEST ABU GHRAIB PHOTOS FOSTER CIVIL LIBERTIES CLASH
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, N.Y., Aug. 17, 2005 -- Civil libertarians and the Pentagon appear headed for yet another train wreck in the ongoing dispute over the so-called "second batch" of photos from Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE NIMBY FACTOR
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- For a country founded on such a wide open door policy, it seems unfaithful to that premise when we turn around and say "Not in my backyard." But, we do. And we extend our property lines on the deeds to now include the air above us and the waters around us. [MORE]

On Media
ILLEGAL PARKING MAKES HEADLINES
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Aug. 14, 2005 -- Two daily newspapers here devoted dozens of column inches to a story about an illegally-parked car yesterday. This silliness was in response to an Internet posting which alleged, without actual proof, misconduct by a public official. The overall issue is how the mainstream media sometimes are manipulated by bloggers of questionable capabilities and ethics. [MORE]

Remembering Watts: Part I
40 YEARS AGO, WATTS RIOT TOOK URBAN VIOLENCE TO NEW LEVEL
by Ron Kenner

LOS ANGELES -- Forty years ago this week, the fiery "Watts Riot" in South and South Central Los Angeles reached, as Time magazine would remember it 20 years later, a "stunning new level for civil violence... - 34 dead, 1,032 injured, 3,952 arrested, some 600 buildings ravaged, property loss about $40 million." [MORE]

Remembering Watts: Part II
WATTS WAS THE TRIGGER FOR BLACK POWER
by Ron Kenner

LOS ANGELES -- By the fifth day of that incredible week - one of the more genuine "have not" protests against the "haves" - The Watts Riots had reduced almost everything to simple black and white. [MORE]

Remembering Watts: Part III
FOR SOME, 1992 RIOTS WERE UNFINISHED BUSINESS
by Ron Kenner

LOS ANGELES -- Two decades after that first riot in Watts, the population had jumped from 30,000 to 42,000, but the growth was almost entirely in Hispanic population. Not much else had changed. [MORE]

Make My Day
HOW DOES HE FEEL ABOUT STUNT DOUBLES?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Although I know people have differing views on writers and our so-called contribution to society, I try to stay out of the fray, except to say that people who don't like writers are mouth-breathing goobers who watch too much pro wrestling. Other than that, I have no opinion. [MORE]

On Native Ground
RECOVERING THE TRUE STORY OF THE ATOMIC BOMB
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Lying and warfare go together like peanut butter and jelly. [MORE]

Momentum
AN ASSEMBLY LINE OF DEATH
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- After the fall of Jerusalem in 70 C.E., the high citadel of Masada, 190 feet above Dead Sea, was the last place of Jewish resistance. When the Roman governor decided to suppress the resisters - called Zealots - he marched his soldiers and slaves to the desert site and spent the next nine months building a ramp to the top. [MORE]

Report From Crawford
AT CAMP CASEY, CINDY SHEEHAN AND ANTIWAR ACTIVISTS AWAIT ARREST
by David Swanson

WASHINGTON, Aug. 10, 2005, 11:20pm -- (Editor's Note: Activist David Swanson, a member of the newly-formed Progressive Democrats of America, reports on the efforts of Cindy Sheehan, the mother of a young soldier killed in April 2004 in Iraq, to meet with President George W. Bush to talk about the loss of her son, Army Spc. Casey Sheehan.) I just spoke by phone from DC with Cindy Sheehan and Ann Wright at Camp Casey in Crawford, Tex. Cindy has been doing interviews non-stop for the past few days. Ann and Diane Wilson and others have been doing most of the speaking with the police about Camp Casey, the name they have given their roadside encampment there. [MORE]

On The Left
DON'T BELIEVE THE HYPE: HOWARD DEAN AND THE P.D.A.
by Joshua Frank

PORTLAND, Ore. -- After all they have been through, they still don't get it. The Democrats are as inept a political opposition as George W. Bush is at running his daddy's oil companies. Democratic National Committee Chairman Howard Dean has just finished a long 30-state trip across the country, during which he met with thousands of enthusiastic Democrats looking for some way to challenge the Republican Party. [MORE]

American Opinion
AS VOTING RIGHTS ACT EXPIRES, A LOOK BACK AT L.B.J.
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, N.Y. -- In our country, we seem to revere only a few presidential speeches - Washington's Farewell Address, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, Franklin Delano Roosevelt's First Inaugural, John F. Kennedy's "Ask Not", and a few others. [MORE]

Dungeons Of Debt
AS BANKS GET READY TO DOUBLE MIMIMUM CARD PAYMENTS, CLIENTS GET READY TO RESPOND
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON -- As a little-known consequence of the new bankruptcy legislation sponsored by congressional Republicans and recently signed by President George W. Bush, many banks and credit card companies can now double the minimum payments on credit cards, part of a move to reduce consumer dependence on credit. [MORE]

Opinion
'AUGUST STORM' OFFERS A MAJOR HISTORY LESSON IN MEDIA MYOPIA
by Ron Kenner

LOS ANGELES -- On Aug. 8, 1945, one week before Japan surrendered in World War II, the Soviet Union launched 1.5 million troops in a massive surprise attack against Japan's occupation forces in Korea and Northern China. The area, as Associated Press writer Slobodan Lekic described it recently, was the size of Western Europe. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
ANOTHER END, OF ANOTHER ERA
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. - Is it possible that a popular fashion (read that to be T-shirts and jeans) will actually be part of a "no logo" approach? Now, that to me is news. Good news. I have trouble finding quality sportswear that isn't emblazoned with some designer's name, initial, or logo. [MORE]

On Media
CULTURE WAR, OR JUST DEMOCRACY IN ACTION?
by Robert Gelfand

FRANKFURT, Germany -- The question for today is why we - Europeans and Americans alike - have trouble respecting each other's rights to make choices in movies or sandwiches or politics. The following are musings by a naive tourist as to television and music, peace and war. [MORE]

Brasch Words
THE GREAT FLIP-FLOP FLAP
by Walter Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- The media have an insatiable appetite for gobbling up even the most superficial minutiae and spitting it out as hard news. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE INCREDIBLE BLIGHT OF TV PUNDITRY
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- When super-pundit Robert Novak stormed off the set of a live CNN show Thursday - just after uttering what the New York Times delicately calls "a profanity" - it was an unusual episode of tv punditry. With rare exceptions, the slick commentators of televisionland keep their cool. But we'd be much better off if they all disappeared. [MORE]

Make My Day
GOURMET COOKING FOR GUYS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I've spent the last 12 years of my life slowly transforming myself from a Guy (with a capital G) to a mature and responsible Man. But there are at least three people who believe there is no difference between a Guy and a Man: Bruce Cameron, author of "How to Remodel a Man," Oprah Winfrey, and he head of the Lifetime Channel. [MORE]

Media Beat
MEDIA FLAGSTONES ALONG A PATH TO WAR IN IRAN
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- On Tuesday, big alarm bells went off in the national media echo chamber, and major U.S. news outlets showed that they knew the drill. Iran's nuclear activities were pernicious, most of all, because people in high places in Washington said so. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE BUSH TEAM RE-BRANDS AN UNFINISHED WAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In a classic example of rebranding, the Bush administration is changing the name of the fight against al-Qaida and other terrorist groups. [MORE]

Sept. 11 Remembered
ANNIVERSARY OF 9/11 HIJACKERS' U.S. ENTRY GOES UNNOTICED
by Ron Kenner

LOS ANGELES -- Exactly four years ago, on Aug. 4, 2001, Mohammed al-Qahtani, the supposed 20th hijacker, was rejected from entry at the international airport in Orlando, Fla., after an alert immigration official, Jose Melendez-Perez, refused to give the usual cursory glance, as he explained it, to an entrant from Saudi Arabia. [MORE]

AR OpEd
HOW CalPERS, NATION'S LARGEST PENSION FUND, MISSED KEY OPPORTUNITY
by Tom Dillon

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- I have been in the financial services industry for over 20 years. I've worked for Merrill Lynch, Bank of America, Dean Witter, Morgan Stanley and, finally, for myself. But I've never seen a financial trasnaction like one I'm going to describe at the nation's largest retirement pension fund, the California Public Employment Retirement System, known by the acronym CalPERS. [MORE]

Europe and Islam
ISLAM'S RADICAL IDENTITY IS FORGED BY POVERTY
by Semih Minareci

CORDOVA, Tenn. -- A stunning new phenomena is occurring among the European far right. Their walls are being plastered with posters which show Muslim minarets ominously rising behind the city's faded gothic cathedrals. What else we could expect after war-cry of President George W. Bush and his neo-con supporters after 9/11? [MORE]

Momentum
HOW THE REAL ESTATE BUBBLE IS BURSTING THE AMERICAN DREAM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The stories keep coming, and none of them are good. [MORE]

American Opinion
SAUDI ARABIA, NIGERIA ARE IN HUMAN RIGHTS CROSSHAIRS
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, NY. -- The internation human rights agency Human Rights Watch is calling on Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Abdullah to pardon three jailed advocates of peaceful reform and urging President Olusegun Obasanjo of Nigeria to "show the world that he is serious about pursuing justice," and "ensure that police torturers are held accountable for their crimes." [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE EYES DON'T HAVE IT
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- There's always something I used to love at Cracker Barrel, the old time, general store-styled restaurant found at most exits of all Interstates (ou can take a virtual tour at www.crackerbarrel.com). This time, John waited on line to pay the check. [MORE]

American Opinion
BILL O'REILLY IN DRAG
by William Fisher

CHATHAM, N.Y. -- Michelle Malkin, who strikes me as Bill O'Reilly in drag, opened one of her recent syndicated rants with this question: "Oh, dear. Oh, dear. Civil-liberties activists, antiwar organizers, eco-militants and animal-rights operatives are in a fright over news that the nefarious FBI is watching them. Why on earth would the government be worried about harmless liberal grannies, innocent vegetarians, unassuming rainforest lovers and other 'peaceful groups' simply exercising their First Amendment rights?" [MORE]

Make My Day
CONFESSIONS OF A BARTENDER
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Dear Patrons: This letter is a little late in coming. About 12 years too late. [MORE]

Last Word
DeFEDE'S FIRING DISGRACES THE MIAMI HERALD
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON -- The Miami Herald has gone on the defensive over its firing of political reporter Jim DeFede, the reporter who allegedly taped a crazy last-hour call from a from Arthur Teele, a former Miami-Dade County commissioner who shot himself a few minutes later in the newspaper's lobby, and has gone to the Poynter Institute in St. Petersburg, Fla., for support. [MORE]

On Native Ground
REJECTING FEAR IS THE KEY TO STOPPING TERROR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The point of terrorism is to terrorize. [MORE]

Official Humor
REP. TOM TANCREDO WANTS TO BOMB MECCA. WHAT A GUY!
by Patrick Osio, Jr.

LOS ANGELES -- What a guy! Don't you just love him? Straight talker, says what he means, means what he says. What more can Americans ask for in a President? Oh, not President Bush. I'm talking about Congressman Tom Tancredo (R-Colo.), who announced he is likely to be a candidate for president in 2008. Hey, look what he told Muslims - if you can't control your religious fanatics, we will wipe out Mecca! [MORE]

Momentum
WHEN POLITICS COUNTED IN ART
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When I was a young girl, my mother enrolled me in modern dance lessons at a professional school in New York called the New Dance Group Studios. Every Saturday morning I took the subway alone from Brooklyn to Manhattan, rode up a tiny, creaky, scary elevator in a narrow old building on West 47th Street, changed into a leotard, and, with other children, learned movement to the beat of a drum. [MORE]

Media Beat
UNLEASHING THE DEADLY DOGS OF WAR
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Midway through July, the Karl Rove scandal was dominating the national news - until the sudden announcement of a Supreme Court nominee interrupted the accelerating momentum of the Rove story. Since then, some anti-Bush groups and progressive pundits have complained that the White House manipulated the media agenda. But when it comes to deploying weapons of mass distraction, the worst is yet to come. [MORE]

American Opinion
FINALLY, A DEGREE IN PUBLIC DIPLOMACY
by William Fisher

OLD CHATAM, N.Y. -- As the U.S. faces increasingly negative attitudes around the world, the previously arcane subject of public diplomacy has become a serious issue in the Bush Administration, Congress, universities, think-tanks and with ordinary citizens. [MORE]

The Angle
IRAN-PAKISTAN-INDIA GAS PIPELINE MAY PUMP NUCLEAR TRADE-OFFS
by Angelique van Engelen

AMSTERDAM -- Pipelines across several countries are often played up to be as opportune as their locations are strategic. You wonder if international terrorists have cottoned on to that fact, because an attack on one would earn a place in any important study of how terrorists do their work. For them, an attack on a major oil or gas pipeline might be rather logical. [MORE]

The Right Side
WAR IS THE ANSWER
by Vance McDonald

AU.TIN, Texas -- In December 1941, America and the free world faced the terrible specter of total war emanating from Germany and Japan. On Sept. 11t, 2001, America and the free world had an identical experience. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE 'LESSER CRIME' OF SMOKING
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- A cocaine addict can walk into any public building, park, bar or restaurant - nose crammed full of the illegal powder - and be an acceptable member of society, albeit one who is breaking the law by having and using that substance. Acceptable, that is, until he becomes restless, irritable, and anxious, at which time he may be asked to leave. [MORE]

On Media
ARIANNA'S REINVENTION OF THE BLOG
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, July 25, 2005 -- Arianna Huffington's new internet site was barely out of the gate when critics lit into it - and into her - with a vengeance. Critics of the critics suggested that it might be fair to wait at least a day or two before going nova on her, but that didn't stop them all. [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT ABOUT 'IDEA FAUCETS?'
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- All thinking must stop! - in Ireland, at least. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WHAT THE G.O.P. DOESN'T KNOW ABOUT AMERICAN WORKERS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Republicans seem to love the slash-and-burn style of modern capitalism. However, it is not a economic model that is sustainable and there are a few smart business out there who reject it and profit from that decision. [MORE]

Momentum
YOU HAVE TO SING
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So there it was again, my summertime conundrum. How do I reconcile the lush beauty of the countryside and my rewarding life with the mayhem my country causes in the world and the danger we all face, every day, as a result of it? [MORE]

On Media
ETHICS AND THE OLD JOURNALISM
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- New ethics guidelines for the Los Angeles Times have been handed down. They are an affirmation of starchy old rules that make for honorable, old fashioned journalism even as they promise dull reading. What's missing is recognition that reasoned judgment should be a part of journalism, just as it is in every other part of life. [MORE]

Passings
JOHN S. SHEA III, A DEVOTED CATHOLIC
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., July 19, 2005 -- John S. Shea III, the son of John S. Shea, Jr. and Nina D. Shea of Rye Hill Road, Monroe, N.Y., passed away at 1:15 p.m. Tuesday, July 19, after his peaceful and accepting encounter with cancer at the Valley View Long Term Residential Health Care Facility in Goshen, N.Y., a few days before his 65th birthday. He spent winters in Bradenton since 1995, and was the oldest brother of Joe Shea, Editor-in-Chief of The American Reporter. [MORE]

Brasch Words
UNCLE SAM WANTS YOU: HOW AMERICANS ARE LOSING THEIR IDENTITY
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- The Army National Guard, faced with extended tours of duty in Iraq, didn't meet its recruitment quota in 2003. So in 2004, it began a multimillion-dollar direct-mail advertising campaign. One of those targeted was Petra Gass, a resident of rural northeastern Pennsylvania, who received a full-color 12"x17" tri-fold telling her in bold capitals that she could be "the most important weapon in the war on terrorism." [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
RUBBER TO THE ROAD
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- According to what I read in the papers, gasoline is now $2.35 a gallon but nobody seems to care. Vacations go on as planned, "Are we there yet?" is still the joke of the day and watching reports of long lines at airports gives a sense of satisfaction. [MORE]

The American Reporter
April 10, 1995 - April 10, 2005
10 Years Of Service

Andy Oram Reports
OPEN SOURCE: ARE THEY KILLING THE COMMONS? by Andy Oram

by Andy Oram

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - The "commons" is the part of the economy that doesn't have a business plan yet. [MORE]

American Opinion
400 DAYS AND OUT: A STRATEGY FOR EXITING IRAQ
by Carl Conetta

WASHINGTON -- The United States could safely withdraw almost all its forces from Iraq within a year or so without further destabilizing the country, according to a July 19 proposal I authored for the Project on Defense Alternatives (PDA), a Washington-based think-tank. Progress toward that end requires a significant political compromise with the Sunni community and with Iraq's neighbors, however. [MORE]

American Opinion
ABUSE? WHAT ABUSE?
by William Fisher

OLD CHATHAM, N.Y. -- The U.S. Army general widely considered the "architect" of abusive prisoner interrogation techniques at Guantanamo Bay, Abu Ghraib and in Afghanistan used "creative" and "aggressive" tactics, but did not practice torture or violate law or Pentagon policy. Despite the recommendations of military investigators, Maj. Gen. Geoffrey C. Miller will not be reprimanded - thus bringing to a close what could be the last of 15 separate investigations into detainee abuse. [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE TO PUMMEL TODAY?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. - Finally, my computer's back from the shop. Not too bad - just $600 to upgrade Old Blue. The guys at the computer shop laughed at me when I brought it in. Sure, I could have gotten a brand new one for $500, but there's nothing wrong with this one. It's still perfectly good. Sure is heavy though. [MORE]

Market Mover
IT'S TIME FOR DEALERS TO COME CLEAN WITH U.S. AUTO BUYERS
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- When it comes to cars, there are very few "elites." [MORE]

On Native Ground
THINK BETTER, WIN MORE: LET'S REVAMP U.S. FOREIGN POLICY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- George Galloway, the British MP who was last seen embarrassing the right-wing yahoos on the U.S. Senate committee investigating the so-called UN "oil-for-food" scandal, was absolutely correct when he said that "Londoners paid the price for Tony Blair's decision to go to war in Iraq and Afghanistan." [MORE]

On Media
'THE WAR ON TERROR' AND THE MEANING OF CARNAGE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- When the French government suggested a diplomatic initiative that might interfere with the White House agenda for war, the President responded by saying that the proposed scenario would "ratify terror." The date was July 24, 1964, the President was Lyndon Johnson and the war was in Vietnam. [MORE]

Momentum
A GORILLA WITH A FLASHLIGHT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Every year when the property tax bill comes in the mail, I'm forced to wonder how much longer I'll be able to keep my home. [MORE]

On Media
THE SCEPTER'D ISLE
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, July 10, 2005 - In this murderous week and on this little-noted anniversary, we are reminded of the enduring power of language and of the legacy of one man to define a civilization. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
ROUND UP THE USUAL MASTERMINDS
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. - What do you do when you have to do something? Well, the Brits stiffen their upper lips and remind themselves of the Blitz. For those of you who don't know what that is first hand, let me tell you it was what the Londoners called the intensive bombings Nazi Germany dropped over their city in 1940 and 1941. [MORE]

Make My Day
TATER TOILERS IN TIZZY OVER TERM
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- In this age of Political Correctness and perpetual victimhood, someone somewhere is always complaining about certain words or phrases. [MORE]

California Journal
IT'S THE DEMOCRATS WHO REALLY RULE CALIFORNIA
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- Think of 1958, so distant in the past that the Los Angeles Times ran front-page stories about Alaska finally being voted the forty-ninth state and Russia launching a rocket that nearly reached the Moon - "farther than any object man has sent from the Earth." [MORE]

Attack On London

BOMBS RIP LONDON BUS AND TRAINS; 33 KNOWN DEAD, 300 HURT

by Joe Shea

LONDON, 8:19am, July 7, 2005 -- Dozens of Britons may be dead this morning and 300 are injured after a series of bomb blasts ripped at least three speeding London subway trains and a double-decker bus was bombed at 9:47am during or shortly after the morning rush hour. Cellular telephone service was disrupted by its dedication to emergency services, but calm quickly returned to the city. [MORE]

Momentum
VAPOR BOY AND THE ENTITLEMENT GENERATION
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Back when I was a reporter on a daily newspaper, I remember the sports editor throwing fits about the "politically correct" crowd who wanted their kids to play in every game, even when they couldn't catch a ball with three hands and a sticky tongue. [MORE]

California Journal
ARNOLD, YOU'RE MESSING UP, BABY; WORK WITH THE DEMOCRATS - OR FAIL
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- Dear Arnold: I recently drove past that huge billboard of you as the "Terminator," that was painted on a building alongside the 101 Freeway in Los Angeles shortly before the recall election. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: LIBERTY
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- My plan was to write something patriotic this July and I started perusing books on my shelf for inspiration. The first quote that grabbed my attention was Benjamin Franklin saying: "They that can give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty or safety." [MORE]

Editorial
FREEDOM
by Joe Shea

For quite a while now, I have had something of a special gift. While it has a variety of manifestations, there it one way that it makes itself known that is very powerful. When my gift makes itself felt in this way it grabs my attention and will not let it go for weeks and even months at a time, until it is fulfilled. And then, usually, it is too late. [MORE]

On Media
HATE LITERATURE IN THE LOCAL DAILY
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, July 4, 2005 -- Last Monday, my local newspaper ran a column by Mona Charen titled, "How can liberals so hate America?" Such is the currently acceptable level of hate literature in America, remarkable only for its being printed in a supposedly decent paper such as Copley's Daily Breeze. [MORE]

Make My Day
RIOTS AT REAL ESTATE AGENCIES?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Prior to 2001, the only thing people had to worry about dyingfrom in California were earthquakes, forest fires, extreme heat, sunstroke, drought, mudslides, the LA Freeway system, and Jay Leno's chin. Apparently now rolling blackouts can kill you too. [MORE]

Brasch Words
AND A JUSTICE FOR ALL: THE LEGACY OF SANDRA DAY O'CONNOR
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- The president of the United States was adamant about how he was conducting his so-called "War on Terror." [MORE]

The Right Side
CIVILIZATION AT THE ABYSS
by Vance McDonald

AU..IN, Tex. -- "These are the times that try men's souls." These immortal words of Tom Paine have never been more appropriate than at this time in history. [MORE]

On Native Ground
ROVE'S SPIN CAN'T SAVE BUSH NOW
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Rather than being upset over Karl Rove's speech in New York last week, when he accused liberals of undermining the war effort, I prefer to see it as a hopeful sign. [MORE]

Media Beat
A MEMO TO THE WAR: THIS IS THE FIRST DAY OF THE END
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- On the propaganda front, it's been another tough week for Washington's war-makers. But for them, where there's hope, there's death. [MORE]

Momentum
A FRISKY RISKY BUSINESS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- That nice widow from Nigeria sent me another email yesterday. It seems that she is stuck with several million dollars in "unnamed accounts" from her dearly departed husband. Her government, for some unfathomable reason, doesn't want the money. So she has chosen me, a complete stranger, to help her out. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
IF IT'S NOT A RERUN, IT'S A REMAKE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Nobody forgets to give Yogi Berra credit for first uttering, "It's déja vu all over again." But, day after day, it's repeated -either in conversation, news reports or in this article itself. [MORE]

On Media
THE PORT OF L.A. WIMPS OUT
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- It was a week in which the mayor's appointed Harbor Commission president called the City Controller "unqualified and politically motivated," then questioned her education and fitness to serve. [MORE]

Make My Day
I'M SORRY - WERE YOU SAYING SOMETHING?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. - Ask anyone what the key to a successful relationship is, and they'll tell you the same thing: communication. [MORE]

On Native Ground
LIES OF THE WAR-MAKERS ARE NO LONGER IGNORED
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Is the tide finally turning? [MORE]

California Journal
THE ORPHANS & WIDOWS CANARD: HOW ARNOLD FAILED TO PREPARE FOR THE BABBLE
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Let's stipulate that California Attorney General Bill Lockyer does indeed write ballot measure descriptions designed to make the state's Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's reform ideas sound awful. Exhibit No. 1 was Lockyer's official ballot description of pension reform, which Lockyer insisted could wipe out orphan and widow death benefits for firefighters and cops. [MORE]

Momentum
ALL THINGS CONSIDERED: REASONS TO SAVE NPR
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When the first plane smashed into the World Trade Center, I was out shopping with my mother. By the time the second plane hit, we were racing home in the car. So I got my first horrified wonder, fear, anger, excitement and shock directly from the voices of the men and women who were reporting the disaster on National Public Radio. [MORE]

Media Beat
LETTER FROM TEHRAN: IN WASHINGTON'S CROSS-HAIRS
by Norman Solomon

TEHRAN -- Washington keeps condemning Iran's government and making thinly veiled threats. But in Iran, many people are in the midst of challenging the country's rulers, in the streets and at the ballot box. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE MOURNFUL NUMBERS OF A WELL-LIVED LIFE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- If you're born at a time of change in your part of the world, you will one day learn it was never on an ordinary day. What might seem ordinary - the birth of a baby girl to a woman who had already delivered eight babies - could not be ordinary on Dec. 6, 1931. This was another mouth to feed, and a frightening prospect at a time later called The Great Depression. [MORE]

On Media
THAT WIKI, WIKI, WACKY WORLD OF THE L.A. TIMES
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Proof that print publications are trying to adapt, however badly, to the Internet Age can be seen in recent editions of "The Atlantic Monthly" and the Los Angeles Times. Paradoxically, they illustrate more about the ways print journalism could be improved by better writing than they tell us about the validity of technical innovation. [MORE]

Make My Day
I'M 266 IN DOG YEARS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- It's my birthday in a couple of weeks, and I'll turn 38. I'm not complaining, because I've enjoyed my 30s so far, and am looking forward to repeating several of them. [MORE]

American Opinion
FOR IRAQI PARENTS, A SAD LESSON FROM THE CHILDREN OF TUZLA
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- It's a little more than 10 years now since that day of death in Tuzla. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WHY DO CONSERVATIVES HATE FREEDOM OF THOUGHT?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The conservative magazine Human Events recently compiled a list of what it considers the "Ten Most Harmful Books of the 19th and 20th Centuries." [MORE]

Momentum
THREE CHEERS FOR NEW ENGLAND'S GAY CULTURE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I did summer stock when I was a kid. And I'll never forget the time I stood in the wings with a group of professional actors, watching a wild musical number progressing on the stage. One actor said something about the terrible camping, and since I knew there were several summer camps in the audience, I told him not to disparage the paying customers. As the other actors roared with laughter, he explained "camp" - exaggerated comic actions and gestures with a homosexual subtext - to innocent little me. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
PETER PAN PANNED
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- If Joan Rivers had said it or Jay Leno, it might have elicited a laugh - after all, they're comedians and Jay, for one, has made comedy fodder out of Michael Jackson and his ways for a generation. His nightly take on the news surrounding the court case alleging Michael Jackson's inappropriate behavior in allowing young boys at the Neverland ranch to share his bed is Jay's idea of humor. [MORE]

Breaking News
JURY ACQUITS MICHAEL JACKSON OF MOLESTATION CHARGES, BUT HE STANDS CONVICTED BY THE PRESS
by Joe Shea

SANTA MARIA, Calif., June 13, 2005 -- The all-white Santa Barbara Co. jury that spent seven days poring over the vast minutiae of his trial on 10 child molestation charges today acquitted pop superstar Michael Jackson on all counts, prompting an immediate chorus of scathing criticism from the likes of conservative talk show host Michael Savage, who mocked each juror on the air as they spoke to the press after the verdict. [MORE]

On Media
SCIENCE WRITING IS A FINE SCIENCE
by Robert Gelfand

SAN DIEGO -- The annual meeting of the Endocrine Society over the June 4 weekend was a chance for yours truly, the amateur media critic, to consider the difficulties of presenting science to the lay audience. It was also a chance to see how well it works in practice. [MORE]

Make My Day
THE BEJEWELLED MAN
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I've never been the kind of Guy to wear jewelry, at least not on a long-term basis, and only certain kinds. I've worn the occasional class ring, a gold chain for a couple months, and a nice cameo brooch when I wanted to feel pretty. And, of course, I've worn my wedding ring every day without fail for the last eleven-and-a-half years, partly because it's a symbol of my undying love for my wife, but mostly because she'd choke the life out of me if I ever left the house without it. [MORE]

On Media
FOR MEDIA, THE MIDDLE CLASS NOW MAKES ITS OWN
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Over one recent weekend, I experienced how this new communications medium known as the internet is changing the political culture. It's not just the internet by itself, but the ways it is being manipulated by political activists that is key. Now, every little community of interest can have the equivalent of its own local newspaper, and everybody is the star reporter. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WANTED: A FEW REPORTERS WITH THE GUTS TO TAKE ON THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The frenzy over "Deep Throat" is fading. The hosannas over the brief, shining moment in history when reporters did their jobs and brought down a corrupt president are dying down. [MORE]

Momentum
SAYING GOOD-BYE TO MARTY JEZER
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I've never seen anyone more alive on his deathbed than Marty Jezer. [MORE]

Media Beat
WAR MADE EASY: FROM VIETNAM TO IRAQ
by Norman Solomon

urgent. [MORE]

Make My Day
THE CRACK OF THE BAT, THE ROAR OF THE CHILDREN
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- "Okay, everyone, we're finally here at the baseball game." [MORE]

To Our Readers
AMERICAN REPORTER IS NOW AT SONIC.NET
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, FL, June 3, 2005 -- For only the third time in our history, The American Reporter has a new World Wide Web host, the Northern California firm of Sonic.net. The transition to their hosting services is nearly complete, and we expect to resume regular publication this weekend. [MORE]

On Native Ground
COMPANIES REPLACE PENSIONS WITH BROKEN PROMISES AND LIES
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It wasn't that long ago that the American workplace operated under a simple compact - in exchange for offering your employer 20 or 30 years of your labor, your employer would pay you a living wage and give you a pension when you retired. [MORE]

Momentum
WHATEVER HAPPENED TO WATERGATE?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Back in 1882, a woman named Elizabeth Jane Cochran changed her name to Nellie Bly and invented investigative reporting. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
NEW YORK AS THEATRE
by Constance Daley

NEW YORK, N. Y. -- Everything in New York is theatre. The curtain goes up and, voila, it's dawn in the city (in this case, I turn on the television set). [MORE]

On Media
L.A.'S MAYORAL CAMPAIGN GOES DOWN TO THE WIRE
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The failure of Los Angeles-area media to explore campaign charges and countercharges was never more apparent than it has been this week, as the campaign between incumbent Mayor Jim Hahn and challenger Antonio Villaraigosa goes down to the wire, with Villaraigosa favored by most pollsters to win on Tuesday. [MORE]

On Native Ground
COL. DAVID HACKWORTH TRULY SUPPORTED OUR TROOPS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There are two groups of people who "support the troops" in Iraq and Afghanistan. [MORE]

Media Beat
POLITICAL BLUSTER AND THE FILIBUSTER
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The battle over the filibuster is now one of the country's biggest political news stories. The Bush administration seems determined to change Senate rules so a simple majority of senators, instead of three-fifths, can cut off debate and force a vote on the president's judicial nominees. Both sides claim to be arguing for procedural principles. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
GETTING OLDER IS KILLING ME
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Sometimes things happen to you before you're ready for them. Take for instance walking around in a body that's 10 pounds heavier and an inch and a half shorter. I'm not ready for that all and less ready to hear the reason for the change. [MORE]

Momentum
AS BIN LADEN LAUGHS, BUSH DANCES TO BAD MUSIC
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A friend from another country visited us recently. I haven't seen her in many years, so I was not surprised when her first question was, "George Bush?" [MORE]

On Media
RE-INVENTING THE SOLDIER-JOURNALIST
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- It's not common in this enlightened journalistic age of ours to read much about the welfare of the common soldier. Syndicated columnist Col. David Hackworth, who passed away this week, was following an old tradition in trying to reestablish that concern among our people. But before Col. Hackworth, before the embedded journalists in Iraq, more than half a century ago there was Ernie Pyle. [MORE]

The American Way
A MOTHER'S ADVICE: 'FOLLOW THE SETTING SUN'
by Boun Sandraow

BOSTON -- Born in 1972, I was forced out of my home village of Goong Mong Ghure, in the country of Laos, back in 1981 as a result of Communist infiltration. The Communists invaded my primitive village and executed many innocent villagers, including my father during their hostile takeover. [MORE]

Passings: David Hackworth
HACK STOOD ALONE
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., May 6, 2005 -- The most decorated living U.S. military veteran, known simply as "Hack," stood before the 82nd Airborne Division Assn. in Fort Lauderdale a few years ago, and taught Military History 101. [MORE]

Make My Day
TIPS FOR THE NEWLY MARRIED GUY
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- As a Guy who has been married for 11 years, I've learned a lot of tips and tricks every Guy should know about successfully living with their wife. I have embraced them fully, and try to practice them on a daily basis, despite what my wife says to the contrary. [MORE]

On Native Ground
NOT CULTURE WAR, BUT CLASS WAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A popular political theory over the past few months is that the ongoing fight over the future of Social Security is just a diversion to allow the Republicans to get away with all sorts of repugnant policies. [MORE]

Momentum
SHARK BAIT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A few years back, when the six luckiest actors in the world - the cast of "Friends" - negotiated a $1 million-an-episode contract, there was a general scratching of heads. It was a lot of money. Were they worth it? [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A SUMMONS TO DUTY
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- For the first time in my life I was responding to a summons to appear before the Superior Court of Glynn County, Ga., for jury duty. [MORE]

On Media
DEMAND FOR OIL, POPULATION GROWTH STIR FEARS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- As the world faces the decline and fall of cheap petroleum, another factor looms. The exponential growth curve of human population, once a popular subject, has become one of the more underreported stories of the current era. The problem is largely misunderstood by mathematically illiterate editorial writers, ignored by the political classes, and avoided by political activists of both the right and the left. It creates further threats to our standard of living even as it exacerbates the rate of oil depletion. [MORE]

Make My Day
RAMBLINGS OF MY TWO-YEAR-OLD SON
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Yaay, morning again! Television and breakfast and milk in a sippy cup! And I love waking up to a really good poopy. That means Mommy has to change my diaper. She makes such funny faces when I do that. [MORE]

On Native Ground
A 'RED' TALKS: ADVENTURES IN TELEVISION
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Remember Sen. Joseph McCarthy and the Red Scare of the 1950s? The days when people lost their jobs and their livelihoods over the slightest association with the Communist Party? [MORE]

Momnentum
A HARD MONTH FOR GOD
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- God was exhausted. He sat in His huge pearly chair behind the huge pearly gates wiping His huge pearly forehead with a huge pearly handkerchief. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
OBITUARY FOR THE DANDELION
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Oh, the dandelion is not really dead in spite of this obituary. Yet, all over the country these spring days, homeowners are slapping their hands together and saying, "Well, that's that." They feel they can rest easily now having followed the instructions of the Home Owners Association's hints on weed removal (couched in words suggesting the HOA might just shun a neighbor who doesn't comply.) [MORE]

On Media
IMPERIALISM CONSIDERED
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- American discussion of the Iraq war consists of little more than sniping about the alleged reasons for the invasion, balanced by a sort of wistful longing for an easy exit. But suppose that the real intent is not an exit, but rather a permanent military presence based on demonstrable economic advantage? Shouldn't political centrists be discussing this developing policy on a rational level? [MORE]

Market Mover
THE CASE FOR DOW 15,000 IN FOUR YEARS
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., April 25, 2005 -- Every few months it's good to both literally and figuratively take stock of things, and a recent review begs me to proclaim a Dow Jones Industrial Target of 15,000 or higher within the next four years. [MORE]

Make My Day
EXCUUUUSE ME!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- The news was enough to make any self-respecting, beer-swilling Guy clap his hands and squeal like a 12-year-old girl at a Britney Spears concert. [MORE]

Momentum
A FAILURE OF IMAGINATION
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When you listen to Antonin Dvorak's Symphony No. 9 ("From the New World"), which the Czech composer wrote just before he left New York in 1895, you can hear his awe at the open spaces of this grand new country - awe at our unlimited sky, endless grasslands and the energy of a people with the space to dream, think, plan and act. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A HOPE FOR THE FUTURE, A LINK TO THE PAST
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It took only seven fast decades to go from being the baby of the family to becoming the oldest functioning member of a very large clan. [MORE]

On Media
PEAK OIL AND THE FUTURE OF OUR CIVILIZATION
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The term "peak oil" is barely mentioned in the mainstream media, yet it may be the most ominous term to face our civilization since plague or H-Bomb. At the least, it means a complete reorganization of every industrial economy and the need for vastly decreased expectations about economic growth. A slightly worse scenario involves, to a large extent, the end of civilization as we know it, followed by the evolution of some new, downsized way of life. [MORE]

Make My Day
ADVENTURES IN VEGETARIAN TAXIDERMY
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- York: Hello, and welcome to Mark York Kitchen Adventures. I'm Mark York and this is my kitchen. [MORE]

On Native Ground
'FIVE-FOOT SHELF' FIGHTS FORCES OF STUPIDITY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- For the past few months I've been making my way through "Dr. Eliot's Five-Foot Shelf of Books," otherwise known as the Harvard Classics. My wife found them last summer at a flea market, 50 volumes for $5 - the literary bargain of the century. [MORE]

American Opinion
FISHING IS THE WORLD'S NEXT RESOURCE WAR
by Robert Ovetz, Ph.D.

FOREST KNOLLS, Calif. -- Until the mid-20th Century, the ocean was a key watery terrain of conflict between competing colonial powers seeking to expand their control over territories and natural resources. [MORE]

Momentum
REQUIEM FOR A REBUILDER
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I've never been confident enough to speak at funerals, and I usually regret it afterwards. So it was last Saturday, at the funeral of someone I deeply cared about, Steve VanDemark of Hinsdale, N.H., who died, way too young, at 55. [MORE]

The Right Side
HIDE! THE PATRIOT ACT IS COMING FOR YOU
by William Dipini Jr.

THE BRONX -- While I was occupied in the overcrowded men's room at school the other day, one of my eccentric friends accosted me - so boorish of him to violate my personal space - and, in a skittish voice, whispered in my ear: "The government has the right to search your home and library records, Wil, without letting you know." [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
MIKE ROYKO: A GOOD NAME TO REMEMBER
Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Mike Royko, the Chicaho newspaper columnist who died in 1997 was awarded the Pulitzer Prize three times in the course of his career for his work for the defunct Chicago Daily News, the pre-Rupert Murdoch Chicago Sun-Times and the post-Murdoch Chicago Tribune. The name Royko always guaranteed a good read and when I saw it in the news today, I paid attention. Royko is not a Smith or Jones name - I knew there would be a connection. [MORE]

Brash Words
STAR SPANGLED AMERICA
by Walter Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa.--Jose Feliciano gave it a new beat. [MORE]

On Media
DINOSAUR BITES MASTODON
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- This week, General Motors announced that it was pulling its advertising from the Los Angeles Times. The spat would be enough to make you bust a gut laughing, except for a troubling underlying reality which was simultaneously being explored in the web-log world. [MORE]

Make My Day
EXTRA! EXTRA! JOURNALISTS SOMETIMES LIE!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. - I always used to roll my eyes at people who said "you can't believe everything you read." With the exception of all supermarket tabloids and magazines, I had always believed that newspapers were - for the most part - fairly trustworthy in the news they reported. Whether I agreed with them or not, I thought the writers always tried their best to be as honest as possible. [MORE]

Media Beat
TAKING NEWS BEYOND THE LIMITS
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- I was glad to open the New York Times last Monday and see the headline: "In Steinbeck's Birthplace, a Fight to Keep the Libraries Open." After visiting Salinas, Calif., over the weekend, I was eager to find out whether the disturbing and uplifting events there would gain any significant national coverage. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE ENDURING INTELLIGENCE OF JOHN KENNETH GALBRAITH
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In the present madness, where reason has been forgotten and self-righteous wingnuts rule, it never hurts to be reminded that there was a time when intelligent people were welcomed into government service. [MORE]

Momentum
A QUIVER OF FEMALE OPINION ARROWS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A few weeks ago, I got a phone call from a colleague who was furious about a local political issue - one that touched on gender. I had to write about it, she insisted, because I was a female columnist. [MORE]

Opinion
55 YEARS WORLD WAR'S END, JAPAN'S MEDIA STILL IN DENIAL
by Adam Gamble and Takesato Watanabe

TOKYO -- Recently, the Bush administration sent Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice on a tour to meet with Asian leaders in an attempt to revitalize ties with Japan. But just like he did with Russia, President George W. Bush must demand a legitimate free-press system in Japan that is not constrained by its government. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
FOR POPE JOHN PAUL II'S LIFE, 'A JOYFUL NOISE'
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- There are really mixed emotions all over the world concerning the death of Pope John Paul II; emotions like sadness, love, reverence, and wonderment as mourners question why this man's death is having such a profound effect on them. [MORE]

The Right Side
WHY LEFTISTS OPPOSE THE REAL I.D. ACT
by William Dipini Jr.

THE BRONX -- The loony leftists have been expending an inordinate amount of energy towards distorting facts about the Real ID Act. With a plethora of information afloat regarding how effortless it was for 9/11 hijackers to acquire driver licenses, and how illegal aliens have been abusing our system, one would think that the insipid leftist mantra would cease. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE LONG WAY HOME
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When Robert Frost wrote "The Road Not Taken" he was writing about making a choice between two roads of equal merit. He chose the one less traveled. [MORE]

On Media
PETTY THIEVES, POLITICIANS AND 'GOTCHA' JOURNALISM
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- A few weeks ago, a local television station decided to investigate reports that parking attendants were stealing from customers' automobiles. They outfitted test cars with hidden cameras, handed the cars off to unsuspecting valet parking crews and secretly watched as the attendants rifled through glove boxes. They recorded on videotape as the attendants pocketed stolen money. One of the thieves took something in excess of a hundred dollars from a center console and stuffed it down his left sock. [MORE]

On Native Ground
R.I.P: THE HYDROCARBON ECONOMY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - The modern world runs on hydrocarbons. The global economy is based on cheap, limitless supplies of oil, natural gas and coal. [MORE]

Make My Day
DON'T BOGART THE POINTY ROCKS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- It's always important, in any business, to appeal to the greatest number of people in your market or audience. Newspapers and magazines write to the average reading level, which is the 6th grade, while radio stations play music that will numb the sensibilities of most people. In some cases, it's smart marketing. In others, it's just dumbing it down to appeal to the lowest common denominator. [MORE]

A QUARTERLY REPORT FROM BUSH-CHENEY MEDIA ENTERPRISES
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The first quarter of 2005 brought significant media dividends for the Bush-Cheney limited liability corporation. [MORE]

Momentum
WHY I DON'T CARE ABOUT TERRI SCHIAVO
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In ghoulish anticipation, the whole world wakes up each morning and asks, "Is she dead yet?" I think it's disgusting. [MORE]

The Right Side
THE CASE AGAINST GODZILLA
by William Dipini Jr.

THE BRONX, N.Y. -- While Members of Congress lead the fracas over the Schiavo case, China is working diligently and hastily towards becoming the next economic and military superpower - a potential threat to the future of the United States. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE PINK BACKLASH
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Mass was especially crowded this Easter Sunday morning - this is an island where tourists congregate for Spring break, and families come to visit grandparents from their own homes all over America. [MORE]

On Media
TELL ME AGAIN HOW MUCH FUN THIS TRAFFIC IS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Anyone who watches American television will discover that we are a nation of devil-may-care adventurers who drive shiny new cars at high speeds and pilot our SUVs through places full of scenic grandeur. It's never a boring day in the land of auto advertising. [MORE]

Make My Day
LOVE LETTER MARKETING 101
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- One day last summer, I was lying in my hammock, drinking a beer and relaxing. I was starting to nod off, when I heard a quiet "ahem." [MORE]

Media Beat
WHERE'S THE REPORTING ON HIGH-LEVEL PARANOIA?
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Journalists often refer to the Bush administration's foreign policy as "unilateral" and "preemptive." Liberal pundits like to complain that a "go-it-alone" approach has isolated the United States from former allies. But the standard American media lexicon has steered clear of a word that would be an apt description of the Bush world view. [MORE]

On Native Ground
JOURNALISM SHOULD NOT BE AN EXCLUSIVE CLUB
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Who is a journalist? [MORE]

Momentum
TWO RED SHOES
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Glitter. Thick stage makeup. Eighty-year-old dancers with great legs. Women (and some men) in fancy gowns. Big egos and small talents lip-synching to popular songs. Usually, when the Lauderdale West Theater Group of Plantation, Fla., puts on a show, that's what it's all about. [MORE]

The Right Side
DEMOCRACY, NOT IMPERIALISM
by William Dipini, Jr.

THE BRONX, N.Y. -- Is the war on terrorism really about global hegemony? Is it really about power? Even if it was about power, should America use that power when it is in our nation's interest to do so? Should we stand reserv ed in the periphery of an active dangerous system and wait for a state to emerge as a superpower to test our powers for us? [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE LURE OF THE INNOCENT
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- In a silent world, like a fish approaching the lure, a child is led away - without a cry, nor even a sound, trusting the grownup leading her from her secure bed toward the unknown. In her innocence, she is unafraid, but within hours her silence reverberates around the nation. [MORE]

On Media
WHY BUSH REALLY WON
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The learned scribes and pundits who portray President George W. Bush as ignorant, irresponsible and reckless somehow have managed to miss the salient point - that is the reason Americans elected him. These unstatesmanlike qualities are considered virtues by certain voter, and that has been the least understood phenomenon of the last election. [MORE]

Make My Day
GUY INJURIES: FACT OR FICTION?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- As a Guy, I've always done typical Guy things. I know how to build houses, cook large slabs of meat with fire, and play several different high-impact sports. And like a typical Guy, I've smashed my thumbs, burned my hands, twisted my ankles, and even broken a finger playing football. [MORE]

On Native Ground
DEMOCRACY IN THE MIDDLE EAST? NOT YET
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Now that the spread of democracy has replaced the elimination of what proved to be non-existent weapons of mass destruction as the rationale for the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, we're supposed to believe that freedom is busting out all over the Middle East. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
DESPERATE TIMES AND ACTS OF DESPERATION
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This wasn't the first time Brian Nichols was in the same courtroom facing these same charges. His girlfriend of eight years accused him of assault and rape; he was brought to trial but the jury couldn't reach a decision, forcing the judge to declare a hung jury. No verdict! [MORE]

Blue Money
TO THE BABEL FISH OF THE BANKRUPTCY BILL, LISTEN CLOSELY
by Paul Petillo

PORTLAND -- Ford Perfect wasted no time inserting the small yellow fish into Authur Dent's aural tract. thus allowing him the use of, as "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" describes it, the oddest thing in the universe. [MORE]

On Media
LESSONS FROM THE LATEST L.A. ELECTIONS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The mayoral primary election is over, and after all the mud and mendacity, it may be useful to think about what we have learned from the experience. The most striking observation is that at least in this giant metropolis, the people seem to be figuring out that the political system is seriously bent, even if it isn't completely broken. [MORE]

Brasch Words
THEY'RE SHOOTING HORSES (AND BURROS) AGAIN, AREN'T THEY?
by Walter Brasch

OATMAN, Ariz. -- Almost every day, a dozen or so wild burros come down from the foothills of the Black Mountains of northwestern Arizona onto the main street of Oatman, a revitalized high desert mining town about 15 miles from where California, Nevada, and Arizona meet. [MORE]

THERE'S NO FUNCTIONING DEMOCRACY WITH NO FUNCTIONING PRESS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It took a whiff of gay sex and the fear of bloggers gone wild to get the corporate press somewhat interested in the story of James "Jeff Gannon" Guckert, the phony reporter who somehow spent nearly two years infiltrating the White House press corps at the behest of the Republican Party. [MORE]

Opinion
SIGNS OF HOPE IN THE MIDDLE EAST
by Parvez Ahmed

WASHINGTON -- President George W. Bush's grand idea of transforming the Middle East is looking better by the day. Whether the Bush administration deserves all the credit for the winds of change is a matter of another debate. [MORE]

Make My Day
NO, I'M NOT GOING TO SAY THAT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Over the last seven years, I've become quite a coffee connoisseur. But until I was 30, I hated coffee with a steamy hot, dark-roasted passion. I blame my wife for my indoctrination. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
IT'S THE SAME OLD SHILLELAGH
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It was one of those conversations where someone is speaking to me directly but as I listen my mind is simultaneously saying wow, wonderful, then asking myself how does this slip by the Madelyn Murray O'Hare's of the country and the ACLU? [MORE]

Momentum
CHARLES AND CAMELIA: AS TIME GOES BY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- For the past few years I've been a fan of a gentle British situation comedy called "As Time Goes By." It originated with the BBC in 1992 and ran in England for eight or nine seasons. Now it plays in repertory on most American PBS stations; it's not hard to find. [MORE]

Media Beat
WHEN JUNK TV INTERRUPTS JUNK TV
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Once in a while, mass media outlets give a fair hearing to radical ideas that make sense. But those ideas have little chance to take hold - mainly because followup is scant. Instead of bouncing around the national media echo chamber, the offending concept falls like a tossed rock. [MORE]

Blue Money
SAVING LABOR
by Paul Petillo

PORTLAND -- Drew told me how he had staged his own personal lobbying effort cornering Senator Ron Wyden (OR-D) with his solution for changing poor attitudes among service workers. This employee believed that morale in the grocery check stand, a union protected position in Portland, Oregon, could be fixed with tip jars. [MORE]

Opinion
CONTROVERSIAL INDIAN POLITICIAN MUST BE DENIED ENTRY TO U.S.
by Parvez Ahmed

WASHINGTON -- Indian politician Narendra Modi must be prevented from entering the United States for his "campaign of extremism." Section 604 of the International Religious Freedom Act allows the State Department to bar the entry of any foreign official who has engaged in "particularly severe violations of religious freedom." Modi will be a good test case for this law. [MORE]

On Media
A FREE AND UNAGGRESSIVE PRESS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- A few days before the city's primary election, the Los Angeles Times ran a devastating expose of the corruption endemic to our system, then buried most of it in the back pages. It is a record of terrific reporting but simultaneously represents a failure of nerve on the part of the paper as a whole. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
WHACKING THE RAILROAD BARONS
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- In the early 20th Century, corrupt railroad barons controlled the Sacramento statehouse, and even wrote the laws. Voters got so sick of it they ushered in reforms including the ballot initiative and recall process. [MORE]

On Native Ground
VERMONTERS TAKE UP IRAQ QUESTION AT TOWN MEETINGS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President George W. Bush may think he had his "accountability moment" regarding the invasion of Iraq by narrowly winning a second term. [MORE]

Make My Day
EDUCATION OF A CONSTRUCTION KLUTZ
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- As I've gotten older, I've discovered there aren't as many handy people around as I thought. When I was a kid, everyone I knew could fix things, remodel entire rooms in a weekend, and build a small shed with an axe and three mature pine trees. [MORE]

Momentum
AT THE GATES
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- My first thought was, "Where are the monks?" I'm told a lot of New Yorkers first thought, "They've turned Central Park into a big car wash." [MORE]

Jill Stewart
CALIFORNIA'S UGLY SKIN GAME
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- It should be a ripping good show in Sacramento in 2005, since the only place more torn by debilitating race, gender and cultural tension than the California State Assembly and California State Senate might be a high-school cafeteria seething with rival gangs. [MORE]

Hominy & GHash
MICHAEL JACKSON, DENNIS RADER AND JUDGMENT DAY
Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Is it merely a coincidence, or could it be divine intervention forcing us to reserve judgment in cases where looking weird does not make you guilty of child molestation, and looking normal does not automatically give you a free pass on accusations of heinous, detestable, murders by torture. [MORE]

Media Beat
EX-PRESIDENTS, AS PITCHMEN, TOUT GOOD DEEDS
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- An Associated Press dispatch from a Thai fishing village summed up the media spin a few days ago: "Former President Bill Clinton's voice trembled with emotion as he and George H.W. Bush put aside their once-bitter political rivalry... ." [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE GONZO LEGACY OF HUNTER S. THOMPSON
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- You had to figure that sooner or later, Hunter S. Thompson would take the Hemingway path. [MORE]

Blue Money
THE GROWING THREAT OF A DECLINING DOLLAR
by Paul Petillo

PORTLAND -- Wen Jiabo is not impressed. The prime minister of China, one of the largest customers of United States Treasuries said it best when he asked, "shouldn't the relevant authorities be doing something about this?" He was speaking to the decline of the dollar, a perilous three year slip that has cost Jiabo's government billions in lost profits on their currency investments while adding billions to their surpluses. [MORE]

On Media
$7 MILLION DOLLARS WORTH OF FLUFF
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The March 8 mayoral primary election is approaching and with it, the 15 and 30 second spots that fill every available commercial moment on local television. It is a collection of little intellectual merit but considerable interest as a snapshot of the current level of manipulative psychology and technology. These ads merit examination for what they tell us about two seemingly unrelated topics, the current obsessions in politics and the status of the low-cost digital methods that are now available to pursue those obsessions. [MORE]

American Opinion
WHY LIBERALS DON'T TOLERATE CAMPUS CONSERVATIVES
by John T. Plecnik

LINCOLNTON, N.C. -- Regardless of age, we have all heard the phrase, "First Amendment Rights," bandied about. Free speech has been the rallying cry of the liberal elite since the '60s, and every time violent protesters are beaten back by police or cordoned off from a rally, the ACLU comes a-calling. [MORE]

Reporting: Algeria
ALGERIANS READY SUMMIT THAT COULD REOPEN BORDERS
by Kaci Racelma

ALGIERS -- Extensive security precautions will be taken in Algiers to protect public buildings against terrorist attacks at the opening of the two-day Arab Summit on March 22 here, a high level security source told The American Reporter. [MORE]

Momentum
THIS BRAVE LITTLE STATE OF VERMONT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It may sound corny, but every time I get off the highway at Montpelier and turn towards the Statehouse, my eyes get misty. [MORE]

Media Beat
GREAT MEDIA CRITICS: INTREPID FOR JOURNALISM AND LABOR RIGHTS
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO - When I think of newspaper journalists who became authors and had enormous impacts on media criticism in the United States, two names come to mind. [MORE]

Reporting: Algeria
AFRICA, TOO, FACES IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS
by Kaci Racelma

ALGIERS, Algeria -- For a long time, they have been people who were forced to flee their homes due to starvation, dire poverty and war, searching out other, more clement areas as a salve for their misfortune. [MORE]

Blue Money
THE FOUR HORSEMAN OF THE ECONOMY
by Paul Petillo

PORTLAND -- Their fearsome riders and invincible steeds gallop across the darkened landscape, their hooves sparking flames everywhere they go. Here come the Four Horsemen of the Economy: higher interest rates, inflation, a weak dollar and slower growth. [MORE]

On Media
THE SONIC ASSAULT ON PUBLIC LIFE
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- At two international sporting events at the Home Depot Center in nearby Carson, Calof., the soccer and rugby were great, but once again I came eardrum-to-amplifier with that recent nemesis of our sporting life, the sound track. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
THE LEFT'S DEFICIT PLAN FOR LATINOS
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO - When test scores came out recently showing that Latino immigrant kids are getting much better at reading and writing English, California superintendent of schools Jack O'Connell urged schools to find ways to move them out of special English and into mainstream classes. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE BUSH STYLE OF CRISIS MANAGEMENT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Disingenuousness is the stock in trade of the Bush White House, but there are times when it gets to be just a bit much. [MORE]

Make My Day
PUNCTUATION STICKLERS UNITE
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Punctuation miscreants, beware. There's a new punctuation book in town, called "Eats Shoots and Leaves," by British punctuation stickler, Lynn Truss. She condemns the illiterate, stupid, and greengrocers of the world, who misuse and abuse proper punctuation. [MORE]

Momentum
SOMETIMES, DEMOCRACY IS THE LAST REFUGE OF A SCOUNDREL
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Times have changed since Dr. Samuel Johnson said that patriotism is the last refuge of a scoundrel. Democracy is the last refuge now. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
HE LOVES ME; HE LOVES ME NOT
Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- You can pluck the slender white petals from a daisy until the nubs of your fingers turn yellow and you still won't know if he loves you or loves you not. For that, you need a rose, preferably a dozen of them - American Beauties if your dreams are your reality. Flowers do have a language, and there is no question that when a man sends his love red roses he is quietly saying, "I love you." [MORE]

Blue Money
HOW SAVINGS CAN CHANGE AMERICA
by Paul Petillo

PORTLAND -- The late Ernst Mayr once said: "Every politician, clergyman, educator, or physician, in short, anyone dealing with human individuals, is bound to make grave mistakes if he ignores these two great truths of population zoology: (1) no two individuals are alike, and (2) both environment and genetic endowment make a contribution to nearly every trait." [MORE]

On Media
THE MAYORAL CIRCUS PARADE COMES TO TOWN
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The slogan for this year's mayoral primary election might as well be "What elephant - What bedroom?" Actually, it's more like a small herd. The candidates are pretending there are no such pachyderms and the press are seemingly oblivious to the backlot odor. [MORE]

Make My Day
DIARY OF A FLU
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- 6:00 am - Stupid alarm clock. I really - oh jeez, I feel awful! Body aches and I think I'm going to faint. Where is snooze button? [MORE]

On Native Ground
DEAN'S A GOOD START, BUT DEMOCRATS MUST DO MORE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Barring a last minute catastrophe, former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean will be the new Democratic National Committee chairman. [MORE]

Momentum
A VALENTINE TO LONG-LASTING MARRIAGE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The house in south Florida was low and white, with green trim and a tile roof. A huge rubber tree took up half of the front yard. I was walking past it last week when I happened to look inside. I saw a small, frail woman, alone in a large space, drifting over to close the curtains. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
AFTER THE TSUNAMI, ACEH ORPHANS STRUGGLE TO SURVIVE
by Andreas Harsono

LILIB BUKTI VILLAGE, Indonesia -- About two dozen boys sat down on the wooden floor inside a stilted hut, joking and cheering, sometimes even hitting one another, just like most boys do. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A 'MILLION DOLLAR' MORAL DILEMMA
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- The credits rolled but no one got up to leave, at least not until their tears dried; and they were not the tears of a sob story or chick flick that flow while we laugh at ourselves for being so sentimental. We remained in our seats, in sobering thought. [MORE]

Blue Money
THROW MOMMA FROM THE TRAIN
by Paul Petillo

PORTLAND --While the State of the Union speech delivered by President George W. Bush last Wednesday brought the usual measures of partisan support and disdain, it proved one thing beyond any doubt: this man can get the country talking. Mr. Bush has the uncanny ability to divide the country even when he talks about something in which residents of both the Blue and Red states have an equally vested interest. [MORE]

On Media
SPORTS, MILITARISM AND FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- On this, the anniversary of the invention of the term "wardrobe malfunction," it seems appropriate to consider the history of politics in the sporting media. An interesting story comes out of Florida which suggests that times really have changed. Along the way, we will consider a recent story from Tokyo along with historical visits to Pasadena and Mexico City. [MORE]

Media Beat
STENOGRAPHY, NOT CURIOSITY, MARKS IRAQ COVERAGE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Curiosity may occasionally kill a cat. But lack of curiosity is apt to terminate journalism with extreme prejudice. [MORE]

On Native Ground
'OWNERSHIP SOCIETY': NEW WORDS FOR SAME OLD SHELL GAME
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Running beneath the Bush administration's talk of creating an "Ownership Society" is something that they won't come right out and say openly - that they are crafting a long-term strategy to render the Democratic Party impotent for decades to come. [MORE]

Make My Day
WILL THERE BE A 'LORD OF THE DANCE' RIDE?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- As a journalist, I am often privy to insider information on a lot of different topics, finding the best and most secret information about important current events, especially if I make it up. [MORE]

Blue Money
RESHAPING THE FUTURE OF OWNERSHIP
by Paul Petillo

PORTLAND -- The term "Ownership Society" has resurfaced, recently wrapped in the President's talk of Social Security reform. The approach so far has been familiar as he portends a looming crisis in the future of this New Deal program. While his numbers may be suspect, the immediate need for change debatable, and the timing wrong, expect Mr. Bush to push his agenda forward in what could be the only year of his second term that he might have a chance at significant reform. [MORE]

On Media
L.A.'S GREAT DEBATE FOLLIES, ACT III: THE COURTROOM
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The exclusion of several candidates from two February mayoral debates has predictably spawned a lawsuit. The debates, sponsored by an organization that calls itself the Citywide Alliance of Neighborhood Councils, are to be run under rules which contrive to exclude the one decently-funded Republican candidate. [MORE]

Blue Money
THE DILEMMA IN DAVOS
by Paul Petillo

The World Economic Forum convened in Davos this week to discuss how the wealthiest nations should conduct themselves in the coming year, what problems to focus on, and more importantly, how to save their smaller, financially troubled neighbors. The United States, which in the past was represented by the likes of Vice President Dick Cheney and Secretary of State Colin Powell, sent no high-level official from the administration to represent our position on issues like poverty and the ills of globalization.. [MORE]

On Native Ground
IS IT TOO LATE TO DECLARE VICTORY AND GET OUT?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President Bush talked incessantly about freedom in his second Inaugural Address. He did this as security personnel dragged away protesters and our nation's capital was transformed into a garrison bristling with thousands of soldiers, cops and Secret Service agents. [MORE]

Momentum
JOHNNY CARSON AND OUR OWN MORTALITY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The death on Sunday of Johnny Carson raises some thoughts about entertainment and mortality. [MORE]

Our Warmest Congratulations to AR Humor Writer Erik Deckers!

Make My Day
A COLUMNIST'S MILESTONE

by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I've achieved a major milestone: This is my 500th column for The American Reporter. For nine years, eight months, and one week, I have published a humor column every Thursday night. If I were a baseball player, I would be 21st on the all-time home run leader list, behind Ken Griffey, Jr., who has 501 - home runs, not columns. Ken Griffey, Jr. can't tell a joke to save his life. [MORE]

Market Mover
AFTER THE TRUMP WEDDING, YOUR MUST-DO LIST
by Mark Scheinbaum

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.. Jan. 24, 3005 -- Okay, so you got the hottest invite of the year, the Trump nuptials across the Intracoastal in Palm Beach. You're shaking off the hangover. Now what? [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE 'GOOD GRINGO:' THE STORY OF PAUL BARDWELL
by Randolph T. Holhut

HATFIELD, Mass. -- At a time when most of the world views the United States with a mixture of fear and disgust, it is necessary to remember that not every American is ugly, and many people out there are working to promote the best values of our country. [MORE]

Market Maker
BUYER ALERT: TERM LIFE INSURANCE PREMIUMS ARE GOING UP
by Mark Scheinbaum

CORAL GABLES, Fla., Jan. 21, 2005 -- One of the last great financial planning bargains is about to go up in price, or in some cases it already has: level premium term insurance. [MORE]

Momentum
WE WANT OUR REVOLUTION NOW
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Where are the tumbrels when we need them? Dust off the guillotine. We need a new revolution. [MORE]

Media Beat
A SHAKY MEDIA TABOO: WITHDRAWAL FROM IRAQ
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The latest polls show that most Americans are critical of the war in Iraq. But the option of swiftly withdrawing all U.S. troops from that country gets little media attention. [MORE]

On Media
THE NEXT MAYORAL DEBATE SCAM
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES - The L.A. mayoral debates continue and once again, reform loses. This time it is the misleadingly named Citywide Alliance of Neighborhood Councils that intends to restrict participation in its debates. Only the big fundraisers get to play. [MORE]

Media Beat
FAR FROM MEDIA SPOTLIGHTS, THE SHADOWS OF 'LOSERS'
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- A system glorifies its winners. The mass media and the rest of corporate America are enthralled with professionals scaling career ladders to new heights. Meanwhile, the people hanging onto bottom rungs are scarcely blips on screens. [MORE]

Make My Day
YOU KNOW, IT'S JUST ... 'IT'
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Erik is out of the office this week, hiding from the new season of "American Idol." To commemorate this event, we are reprinting a column from 2003 commemorating these purveyors of pop, these connoisseurs of crap, these sultans of snot... . [MORE]

On Native Ground
AND THEY CALL IT DEMOCRACY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Democracy is more than voting. [MORE]

Momentum
SOCIAL SECURITY DISTORTIONS ARE ONLY USE'S LATEST
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There he goes again. Our President, the one who most notably brought us invisible Iraqi weapons of mass destruction, who recently claimed to have a sparkling clean bill of health as the press buzzed about his new defibrillator, who claimed he was a "uniter instead of a divider" and a "compassionate conservative" and then bombed innocent Iraqis while half of the world took to the streets against him, is at it once more. [MORE]

On Media
BLOGGING DOWN A TRADITIONAL PATH
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- It was in a stack of used books being sold for two dollars apiece outside a dusty museum of hollywood memorabilia. The book, Humor from Harper's (1961) held a brief essay by William H Whyte Jr. which, though satirizing a literary trend of the 1950s, seems to resonate in terms of that current fad or phenomenon known as the "blog." [MORE]

On Native Ground
ARE WE NOT TOO LATE, OR TRULY DOOMED?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The Canadian journalist Gwynne Dyer, in an upcoming revised edition of his landmark 1985 book, "War," tells a story about the Forest Troop of baboons in Kenya. [MORE]

Make My Day
FREEZE! THIS IS A HOAGIE!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- It seems cheese sandwiches have been in the news a lot during the last few months. But not always in a good way. [MORE]

Momentum
FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Even as the death toll climbed, the bodies washed ashore, and the horror of it began to sink in, there was just one thought running through my mind: how can it be made any clearer that we are all one world, we are one world, we are one? [MORE]

Brasch Words
PRESIDENT USE'S 'APPROPRIATE' RESPONSE
by Walter Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa., Jan. 5, 2005 -- On Sunday, Dec. 26, an earthquake-triggered tsunami with devastating effects 1,000 miles from its epicenter in the Indian Ocean near Sumatra hit 12 countries. Within hours, numerous countries and private social service agencies had begun massive relief operations. President George W. Bush, vacationing on his ranch in Crawford, Texas, made no public statements. [MORE]

Media Beat
MEDIA SENSE AND SENSIBILITIES
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- At a pair of British daily newspapers - the Independent and the Guardian - plus the Observer on Sunday, journalists are far more willing than their U.S. counterparts to repeatedly take on powerful interests. Tough questions get pursued at length and in depth. News coverage is often factually devastating. And commentaries don't mince words. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
FOREIGN CONVICTS COST CALIFORNIA $4 BILLION A YEAR
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- Forgive me if I missed the media coverage of the international dustup between California State Senator Gloria Romero of Los Angeles and the Mexican government the other day. The media downplays stories it perceives as "blaming the victim," particularly on the hands-off topic of illegal immigration. [MORE]

On Media
JOURNALISTIC OBJECTIVITY RECONSIDERED
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Things creep up on you. Hardly anybody has noticed that we are now precisely halfway through the "oughts" - that is, the years '00 - '09. And if we think about what has been happening, we will notice that peculiar things have been creeping into our media and - without our always paying attention - are solidifying. At the same time, as we shall see, there are things that may need changing that have stayed the same. [MORE]

Make My Day
ARE YOU A CHRISTMAS CLOTHES GEEK?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- It's a tradition that's been handed down from generation to generation, and one that I've largely ignored for my entire life. I never wear the clothes I received for Christmas right after Christmas. [MORE]

On Native Ground
A DISINFORMATION CAMPAIGN CREATED THE SOCIAL SECURITY 'CRISIS'
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I look at how the Bush administration is trying to manufacture a Social Security "crisis," and it looks much like what was done to manufacture the rationale for invading Iraq. [MORE]

Media Beat
TAILGATING THE NEW MEDIA TECHNOLOGY
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The last few days of every year bring a heightened sense of time passing, never to return. "Not always so," the end of a calendar reminds us. [MORE]

Andy Oram Reports
'SOCIAL WEB' HAS FAR TO GO, BUT MUCH PROMISE
Andy Oram

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Two ideas, diametrically opposed in philosophy and approach, have seized the attention of Internet companies and technologists over the first few years of this century. Given that the century will be so long and we have barely started yet, it's hard to say which will turn out to be most important. One stresses classification, the other community. These two ideas are attracting both money and attention, but neither has yet borne fruit. [MORE]

On Media
L.A.'S MAYORAL DEBATES NOTABLE FOR MAN WHO ISN'T THERE
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES - So far, there have been two televised debates for L.A.'s 2005 mayoral election. In each, the supposedly reform-minded sponsors took the path of expediency by inviting only professional politicians. For all the talk among liberals and reformers about demanding that free air time be provided to candidates, when push came to shove the League of Women Voters and the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters excluded all the unfunded and underfunded candidates from their debates. [MORE]

Passings
BILL JOHNSON INSPIRED MANY, AND SAVED ONE
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Dec. 25, 2003 -- This has been about the saddest Christmas ever. First my oldest brother, Johnny, told me about a month ago he'd come down with bladder cancer. On Dec. 21, my wife's second husband, a commandante of the National Police in Cuzco, died when his bus plunged off a cliff in Peru, where she's from. Then, two nights ago, I got a note from the grandson of Bill Johnson, the American Reporter Correspondent whose stories from the scene of the Oklahoma City bombing on April 19, 1995 - just nine days after we began publishing - put on the map, He died peacefully late at night on October 26 at Baptist Hospital in Oklahoma City, several days after heart surgery to replace a failing mitral valve. [MORE]

Brasch Words
A FAILURE TO SUPPORT OUR TROOPS
by Walter Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- As usual, Donald Rumsfeld was in control. At a "town hall" meeting with almost 2,000 American combat soldiers in northern Kuwait, the Secretary of Defense and his PR machine were going to give a "pep rally" to troops about to go into combat. He would prove he cared about the individual troops, that the Bush administration supported them, and that God and country, at least 51 percent of the mortal voters, were patriots who supported President George W. Bush and, thus, the war. [MORE]

Momentum
AMERICA AIN'T SINGING
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I've just heard America and it ain't singing, baby. Instead, the sound our country makes is more like rampaging engines at the start of some low-rent demolition derby. [MORE]

Market Mover
TOP BUSINESS STORIES OF '04 LOOK FAMILIAR
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Dec. 22, 2004 -- In return for getting up before dawn each day for a live, ad-lib radio business commentary, Doug Stephan, host of the syndicated "Good Day" radio show, asks me to pick the top business stories each year. My work is easy this time around, since the list is strikingly similar to last year's offering, except for the 2004 Presidential Election results. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE LONESOME DEATH OF GARY WEBB
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's the loneliest feeling in journalism. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
HOW TO STAMP OUT CHRISTMAS
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- On cue, California jumped into the yearly fray over why Christmas symbols and carols get banned from schools and other public places, when that well-known religious radical, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, ignited a controversy by pointedly calling the state's official "holiday" tree its "Christmas" tree instead. [MORE]

On Media
HAS NEW HAMPSHIRE'S PRIMARY OUTLIVED ITS USEFULNESS?
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The Democrats may be rethinking the primary system - that strange process where Iowa and New Hampshire get to tell the rest of the country who the presidential candidates are going to be - and the Des Moines Register is sounding nervous. [MORE]

American Essay
A WALK DOWN CHICKEN STREET
by Chris Verrill

PACIFICA, Calif. -- "Kabul suicide attack: 7 injured," reads the headline today. The news story says, "A suicide grenade attack in the center of the Afghan capital of Kabul Saturday injured seven people, including three international peacekeepers. Three blasts shook a shopping area in downtown Kabul." [MORE]

Opinion
WANTED: AN HONEST BROKER FOR THE MIDDLE EAST
by Sam Bahour

WEST BANK, Palestinian Authority -- The steady flow of international dignitaries to Israel and Palestine following the confirmation of the new transitional Palestinian leadership has been rather impressive. Outgoing American Secretary of State Colin Powell, outgoing UN envoy for the Middle East Terje Roed-Larsen, British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer, among others, swooped down on the region as if the historic moment of Yasir Arafat's passing was the moment the region had been waiting for. Unfortunately, not one of these diplomats, or anyone in the Palestinian leadership for that matter, has proposed anything beyond brushing the dust off already failed initiatives and placing the burden for progress on the results of the upcoming Palestinian elections. [MORE]

Opinion
KEY ABORTION DECISIONS HAVE LOST THE PLAINTIFFS
by Steve Casey

STONEWALL, La. -- Recently, while in Washington D.C., I met and talked with two ladies who were used in changing the face of American society in the 20th Century. The two ladies were Norma McCorvey and Sandra Cano. [MORE]

On Native Ground
JESUS CHRIST AND THE GOP
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What does the term "moral values" really mean? [MORE]

Make My Day
HAVE YOU EVER TRIED A PLUNGER?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Some days I hate being a writer. Days like today. Not one of those "oh crap it's two hours before deadline, and I don't have a topic" day. That's the story of my nearly-ten year writing career. It's also how I got through college. [MORE]

Market Mover
RADIO? ARE YOU SIRIUS?
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla. --In two days, two octogenarian clients wanted to buy stock in Sirius, the satellite radio company. One wanted to buy 100 shares at $9, the other just "two hundred dollars worth of stock." [MORE]

Ink Soup
A SHOT OF CANADIAN
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- "Victoria Clipper" is the name for four vessels that ply the route from Seattle to Victoria, British Columbia - a trip that, on a good day, takes two and a half hours. [MORE]

Momentum
THE BATTLE OF THE BULGE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- My uncle, Bernard Kampler, a kind young man much loved by his family, a high school swim star, newly married, died 60 years ago this week in the Battle of the Bulge under unimaginably harsh and terrifying conditions. In my family, the repercussions of his death are still flowing outward, like rings from a stone dropped into a deathly still pool of water. [MORE]

On Media
ECONOMIC APOCALYPSE IS 'TALK OF THE TOWN'
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- The dollar has been falling like a stone even as economic forecasters are predicting further turmoil. Rather than ask why this is happening, we should probably be asking why it hasn't happened sooner and why it hasn't been even worse. And, later, I have my own hypothesis. [MORE]

On Native Ground
HOW FUNDAMENTALISM FAILS AMERICA
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Can a country where more people believe in the Devil than in evolution maintain its leadership in the sciences? [MORE]

Market Mover
MISSING THE CHARITY TARGET
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- Sometime around Turkey Day, the management of Target Stores must have believed the cynic's adage, "No good deed goes unpunished." [MORE]

Momentum
ROCKING THE LITTLE MAN IN THE BOAT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Is it just me or is there an air of sexual repression wafting through our country? [MORE]

Make My Day
SHOPPING DAYCARE FOR GUYS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- You know, sometimes you just have to envy England. Not only are they famous for their warm, sunny climate - oh wait, sorry... Not only are they renowned for their superb gourmet food like black pudding or - um, sorry. Let me try again... . Not only are they known for their exciting spectator sports like cricket and lawn bowling - dang it! [MORE]

Ink Soup
BLOGOUT
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- What is a blog? Oh, I know that the word is a coinage made from the last b of web and the word log. But even if its pre-cute form is web log, I'd still like to know what is it? [MORE]

On Media
A WAKE-UP CALL TO LIBERALS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- In the aftermath of electoral defeat, the anti-Bush coalition has been in the process of reevaluating its tactics. While most of it comes across as wishful whining, Marc Cooper of the L.A. Weekly and Peter Beinart, editor of The New Republic, have fired a couple of shots across leftist bows that are generating a flurry of comments. [MORE]

On Native Ground
ECONOMIC ARMAGEDDON? IT MAY COME SOONER THAN YOU THINK
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There will be many chickens coming home to roost in President Bush's second term. Perhaps the biggest one of all will be the true state of the American economy. [MORE]

Momentum
ACT THE ANGEL, BE THE BRUTE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Many of our mortally wounded are not coming back wrapped in body bags or bandages. [MORE]

Make My Day
ANIMAL INTERSPECIES DATING: SIN OR CIVIL RIGHT?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Just when we thought we would get a much-needed rest from moral politics, a new emotion-charged controversy has reached a fevered pitch in Provo, Utah. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE UNVANISHED
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- When I awoke from troubled dreams this morning it seemed to me that two topics would force themselves into this Ink Soup: the full moon on the day after Thanksgiving, and what I took to be the not unrelated but totally unprecedented vanishing of our cat Huck. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE HOUSE BY THE SIDE OF THE ROAD
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When Joseph Conrad quoted Edmond Spenser's line "Sleep after toyle, port after stormie seas, Ease after war, death after life, does greatly please," I sensed he was taken with the warmth of those suggested feelings. So taken was he with the little verse, it is engraved on his tombstone where, I suggest. he was laid to rest in Canterbury with a contented smile on his face. [MORE]

On Media
IT'S TIME FOR INTERNET II
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Imagine a highway system where people make their own license plates and change them as often as they want. Thieves abound. Hit and run goes unpunished. Few get caught because it is hard to trace them. That's what the Internet is like nowadays. Somehow the Digital Superhighway has become the Devil's Driveway, more like some post-nuclear holocaust novel than that idealistic portrait of educational opportunity the visionaries hoped we would all experience. [MORE]

Media Beat
MEDIA JITTERS IN THE NUCLEAR AGE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Top officials in Washington are now promoting jitters about Iran's nuclear activities, while media outlets amplify the message. A confrontation with Tehran is on the second-term Bush agenda. So, we're encouraged to obliquely think about the unthinkable. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER AND THE 'SAFE SEAT' SCAM
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- To the embittered liberals who say Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's fundraising of $73,000 a day proves he's owned by special interests, my response is: Dear Guv, please keep raking in far more dough than Gray Davis. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE POLITICS OF DIVISION CAN BE OVERCOME
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The hysteria over same-sex marriage has been credited by some pundits as the key issue that gave President Bush a second term. [MORE]

Momentum
PRESIDENT BUSH 'OUT OF TOUCH' WITH REALITY, HERSH SAYS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As the election recedes, there's good news and bad news. And we're not going to like any of it. [MORE]

On Media
THE CONTROLLER AND THE TIMES NAIL L.A.'s MAYOR
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Nov. 22 -- In exposing a government scandal, it sure helps when a zealous public official and a big-city newspaper manage to find each other. Such is now the case in Los Angeles, where the Los Angeles Times and City Controller Laura Chick have been playing tag-team against Mayor James Hahn. [MORE]

On Native Ground
BEYOND THE RED AND BLUE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We know the map by heart now, the sea of red with the blotches of blue on the edges - the visual representation of President Bush's alleged mandate. [MORE]

Momentum
SUCH A LONG WAY, BABY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's the best of times, it's the worst of times. Condoleezza Rice, the Cold Warrior Woman, will be America's second female Secretary of State. What can feminists make of this? [MORE]

Jill Stewart
A SOUTHERN DEMOCRAT IN 2008? DON'T MAKE ME LAUGH
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- All the caterwauling by talking heads who insist the Democrats can win the presidency in 2008 with a religious Southerner has me laughing - well, chuckling painfully, anyway. [MORE]

Ink Soup
OUTRIGHT
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- A few years ago, sitting on a bench in Palmer Square with a colleague whom I knew only slightly, I had an experience totally without precedent for me at the time. He came out to me. [MORE]

On Media
HOUSE RULES COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN SURVIVES TALK SHOW'S 'HUMAN SACRIFICE'
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- It was a populist dream come true. The effort pf two talk show hosts to unseat Rep. David Dreier (R-Calif.) was presented to the voters of his district as a chance to rise up and defeat a comfortably entrenched politician who had strayed from the fold. The plan ultimately failed, but the margin was surprisingly narrow, considering the district and the candidate's previous track record. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
INDONESIAN CHINESE FACE ECONOMIC DISCRIMINATION
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, Nov. 10, 2004 -- Many Chinese-descent Indonesians are worried about the new Indonesian government's economic policy, fearing they may become victims of discrimination advocated by Vice President Jusuf Kalla. [MORE]

Media Beat
TRANSFORMING FOUR MORE YEARS
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Right-wing trumpets are making a horrific racket across a ravaged political landscape. For now, hope is barely audible. Progressives seem like fledglings without feathers, weakly tapping from inside thick shells. Four more years sound like hell. [MORE]

On Native Ground
MANDATE? WHAT MANDATE?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Now that we lefties have all had a few days to digest the election results and what they mean, it's time to start thinking about how we're going to play defense for the next four years. [MORE]

American Essay
WHEN THE BODY BAGS COME HOME
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., Nov. 13, 2004 -- "When they come to the door, you know there is only one reason. I asked them when did he die and they told me." [MORE]

Momentum
ANGRY IN VERMONT: 11 WAYS TO FIX THE WORLD
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A gloom has descended over the place where I live - the most progressive county in progressive Vermont. We're still reeling from the election results. [MORE]

Reporting: Philadelphia
G.O.P. HIRED MEN TO SUPPRESS PHILADELPHIA VOTING, LAWYER SAYS
by Margie Burns

PHILADELPHIA -- In Philadelphia, the Republican Party hired local people - apparently including at least one knife-waving drug addict - as neighborhood poll watchers, paid them watchers to challenge their neighbors' votes, and sent visiting teams of burly workers in vans in a mixed strategy of intimidation and misinformation to try to suppress voting on November 2, according to a Brooklyn law student who worked as a poll monitor. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
EMBEDDED WITH THE MOB
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It goes without saying, for the most part, that mothers are loved. (Perhaps Lizzie Borden's was an exception.) And my mother was loved to the point of reverence by all nine of us. If any one of us knew how to go about it, we would have submitted her name and life story to the Committee to Consider Canonization to Sainthood - if there were such a body. Surely, she is a saint in Heaven just as she was a saint on Earth. [MORE]

Make My Day
I KNOW BILL CLINTON, TOO
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- As someone who follows politics the way sports fans follow baseball, I was excited about my recent trip to Washington, D.C., home of the White House, Capitol Hill, and the National Bead Museum (official motto: Yes, there's a museum for those!). [MORE]

Brasch Words
A BONE OF CONTENTION
by Rosemary R. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- I heard it. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WE TRIED. WE FAILED. WE MUST TRY ONCE AGAIN.
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's now official. We are no longer a reality-based country. [MORE]

Momentum
THE DAY-AFTER-ELECTION-DAY BLUES
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As I write, Sen. John Kerry has just conceded the extremely close presidential election to President George W. . But the damage has been done - with a record turnout, the results mean that half the voters in the United States are fools. [MORE]

On Media
IT'S BUSH'S WAR NOW
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- President Bush's reelection signifies a seriously weakened United States, both politically and militarily. This should be painfully evident, yet it is curious how few of our learned commentators have been willing to make that point openly. [MORE]

Campaign Trail
A BLAZE OF HUMANITY AMID THE MACHINES
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- We were at the end of 5:30 p.m. Mass at St. Martha's Roman Catholic Church in Sarasota, a few miles from home, when the sound of squealing brakes and a distinct thump! shocked the congregation to silence. Just seconds later a man ran into the crowded church, calling for someone to dial 911. "A woman has been hit crossing the street!" he shouted. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE DIVINE MADNESS OF PRESIDENT BUSH
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The Bush presidency has been hard on the souls of every person who has a brain and believes in rationalism, humanism and liberalism. [MORE]

Brasch Words
THE VANISHING TRUTH ABOUT IRAQ
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- The CIA said there was no connection. The 9/11 Commission said there was "no credible evidence." Counter-terrorism expert Richard Clarke, advisor to four presidents, said there was no link. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) said, "We made serious mistakes." Even Donald Rumsfeld grudgingly said there probably wasn't "any strong, hard evidence." [MORE]

Campaign 2004
NADER'S TWO-TIME RUNNING MATE BACKS JOHN KERRY
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Oct. 16, 2004 -- Presidential candidate Ralph Nader's 1996 and 2000 vice-presidential running mate, Native American activist Winona LaDuke, has dealt the 2004 Nader presidential campaign a cruel blow: LaDuke is endorsing Nader's rival, Democratic presidential candidate Sen. John F. Kerry, she said Wednesday in Indian Country Today, the nation's top news magazine for Native Americans. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE NAKED PRESIDENT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Less than three weeks away from the election, the truth is now staring us in the face and only the willfully blind cannot see it. [MORE]

Make My Day
LIKE SUPERMAN AND LEX LUTHOR
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Everyone had a nemesis growing up. Someone who was there to bother, harass, and torment them, and generally try to make life unpleasant. Abel had Caine, Julius Caesar had Brutus, and everyone who likes music has Britney Spears. [MORE]

Momentum
LEAVING IRAQ: IT'S ALL SMOKE AND MIRRORS NOW
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The words I most want to hear from both presidential candidates are these: "We're pulling out of Iraq, starting today." [MORE]

Ink Soup

DROPPING EAVES

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Did Yogi Berra say that you can hear a lot by listening? No? Well, he will say it once he reads it here. Anyway, here are some things I've heard by listening. [MORE]

America at War
SCHISM, DEPARTITION AND OTHER NEW IDEAS FOR THE MIDDLE EAST
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- Are there new ideas and new approaches that might reduce tensions in the Middle East, or lead to a clear-cut victory over Islamic funamentalist terrorism? Maybe, but they are not being heard. [MORE]

Reporting: Costa Rica
JUDGE ISSUES ARREST WARRANT FOR O.A.S. SECRETARY-GENERAL
by Saray Ramírez Vindas

SAN JOSÉ, Costa Rica, Oct. 8, 2004 — A Costa Rican judge has issued an international arrest warrant for former president Miguel Ángel Rodriguez, who until he resigned this afternoon was Secretary-General of the Organization of American States (OAS). The warrant came after prosecutors alleged that Rodriguez, who as OAS head was one of the most influential figures in the Western Hemisphere, conspired to receive illicit payoffs from the French telecommunications giant Alcatel and others. [MORE]

Debate Review
BUSH RIGHTS HIS SHIP, KERRY SAILS ON
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Oct. 9, 2004 -- President George W. Bush showed himself a vastly improved debater Friday night in the second of three face-to-face meetings, while his opponent, Sen. John F. Kerry of Massachussetts, not only held the ground he won in their first debate but improved his standing among uncommitted voters in battleground states that could hold the key to victory Nov. 2. [MORE]

On Native Ground
JOHN KERRY AND THE POLITICS OF FLEXIBILITY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Two years ago this week, Sen. John Kerry gave a speech on the floor of the Senate explaining why he was voting in favor of giving President George W. Bush the authority to invade Iraq. [MORE]

Make My Day
JUST DON'T HIT IT THERE!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Over the past few years, I've avoided golf because of one particular incident from my past. It has haunted me well into adulthood and has prevented me from picking up a golf club for over 28 years. [MORE]

Momentum
THE LONELINESS OF THE LONG-DISTANCE DAUGHTER
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's funny how quaint it seems now, the idea of retiring to Florida (or even having enough money to retire at all). But thirty years ago it was the dream of millions of hard-working Americans, many of whom actually pulled up their northern roots and moved south. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE BIRDMAN OF SHILSHOLE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- As a birder, I am strictly an amateur, and never roam about in search of them. But when they come to me, as they incessantly do so long as I remember to fill the feeder on the back deck, I like to know who they are. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
POLL SEASON, SCHMOLL SEASON: WHY MEDIA CAN'T SEE THE CALIFORNIA RIGHT
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- It's a presidential election year, a Sacramento legislative battle year and a ballot measure year. That means it's poll season. For me, dazed and confused in recent years by contradictory polls and the unpredictable political mutts known as California voters, I say "poll season, schmoll season." [MORE]

Brasch Words
APPLAUDING ONLY THE 'RIGHT' ENTERTAINERS
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. - They call themselves Patriotic Americans Boycotting Anti-American Hollywood, or PABAAH for short. If it was anything but an acronym, PABAAH would be on the Homeland Security "no-fly" list. They believe Sean Penn and Janeane Garofalo are traitors. They want John Ashcroft, defender of some of the Bill of Rights, to charge Michael Moore with treason. [MORE]

Reporting: Costa Rica
PRESSURE MOUNTS ON O.A.S. SECRETARY-GENERAL TO RESIGN
by Jay Brodell

SAN JOSÉ, Costa Rica, Oct. 3, 2004 —- Pressure is growing here for former Costa Rican president Miguel Ángel Rodríguez, a leading economist and now the Secretary-General of the influential Organization of American States, to resign from post at the O.A.S., a hemispheric counterpart of the United Nations. [MORE]

On Media
ADJECTIVES AND ELEPHANTS DEFINED FIRST DEBATE
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES - The first presidential debate had its own giant elephant in the bedroom, and it is an Asian elephant. Meanwhile, the Bush-Cheney reelection campaign has been concentrating its fire on the interpretation of adjectives. It would be funny if it weren't so serious. Perhaps tragicomedy is the right term that describes the week of Sept. 30, 2004. [MORE]

First Person
AMERICA'S BEST HOSPITAL WAS THEIR WORST NIGHTMARE
by Dan Walter

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - I have been reading recent stories about malpractice problems at Johns Hopkins Hospital with great interest. I took my wife there for a relatively low-risk procedure two years ago and through a series of astonishing mishaps, she almost died. Since then, I've spent a lot of time trying to figure out how such things can happen in one of the best medical facilities in the world. [MORE]

Make My Day
KIDS SAY THE SCARIEST THINGS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- My kids and I have a special relationship. They are free to bring up certain topics of discussion. I am free to make nasty faces and freak out at near-hysterical levels. They know which buttons to push, and will push them just to watch me have an apoplectic fit at the things they say. But most of the time, they do it without knowing they're pushing any buttons. [MORE]

The 2003 Debates
LIKE THE PHOENIX, KERRY SOARS IN POST-DEBATE POLLS
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Oct. 1, 2004 -- Here in the Gulf Coast hinterlands of Florida where Republicans hold virtually every public office in this and the neighboring counties, the crew at a local Post Office was upbeat this afternoon. "He's gong to win. "He better win." "I think he"ll win," said three different postmen as they talked with a customer they knew to be a Kerry. One even presented him with three candid photos of Vice President Al Gore during a year 2000 campaign stop in nearby Sarasota and a book of matchesd from Air Force Two, the Vice-President's plane. [MORE]

On Native Ground
DEBATES WILL REVEAL THE 'INTELLIGENCE GAP'
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There will be many contrasts between U.S. Senator John F. Kerry and President George W. Bush that will be seen in Thursday's first presidential debate. [MORE]

Reporting: Costa Rica
OAS CHIEF SAYS HE GOT $140,000 LOAN
By Jay Brodell

SAN JOSÉ, Costa Rica -- The secretary general of the Organization of American States said Thursday that he had received $140,000 from a French telecommunications firm to advance his candidacy for the job he now holds. [MORE]

Momentum
SERMON FROM A DIFFERENT, FAR BETTER MOUNT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Watch President George W. Bush on the campaign trail. Notice how he gives a quick, manly, forward hunch of his shoulders just before he gives a speech. Then he swaggers forward just a step and his hands settle briefly around his belt. No matter how compassionate the speech that follows, the hunch and the settle say something different to the Republican elect. They say that John Wayne is back. [MORE]

The 2004 Debates
WHO DOES GOD WANT?
by Mister Thorne

SAN FRANCISCO -- It was the 13th of December, 1999; it was Des Moines, Iowa. George W. Bush was debating the other candidates hoping to be the GOP's nominee for president. Near the start of the debate, Bush responded to a question from Tom Brokaw about "an evolving culture of violence and rage in America." [MORE]

American Essay
BEFORE TWO FLAGS: THE FAITH AND POLICY OF DOUGLAS FEITH
by Tom Barry

DALLAS -- {Editor's Note: Earlier editions of AR published this article under the name of a person who had plagiarized the article. The American Reporter regrets and apologizes to the actual author, Tom Barry.] With no end in sight to the ever-worsening situation in Iraq, what is sorely needed in Washington to turn the situation around is the de-linking of its foreign policy from the agenda and priorities of Israel, and a re-linking of America's Iraq policy with the broader Arab-Israeli conflict. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
DESPITE BIG CHANGES IN JAKARTA, DOUBTS OVER INDONESIAN UNITY PERSIST
by Andreas Harsono

TOMOHON, Indonesia, Sept. 28, 2004 -- Jakarta may have made enormous progress by organizing the first direct presidential elections in Indonesian history, but skepticism about its Javanese-dominated governments remains high in this Christian-dominated town in northern Sulawesi where distrust is deeply rooted. [MORE]

The A.R. Interview
EX-D.I.A. OFFICER QUESTIONS 9/11 REPORT, FAULTS HUMAN INTELLIGENCE LACK
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON -- Ted Pahle has retired after 34 years of experience in intelligence matters with the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Office of Naval Intelligence, and U.S. Army Intelligence. Now it's his turn to speak up, and he has. [MORE]

On Media
EDUCATION IS NOT THE PANACEA
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The governor of California signed a bill this week to give special privileges to hybrid cars which get better than 45 miles to the gallon. The president of the Ford Motor Company objected. Apparently Ford can't build that car, while the Japanese can. [MORE]

On Native Ground
BUSH FLOUTED U.N. CHARTER WHEN HE INVADED IRAQ
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President George W. Bush went before the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday to defend his administration's decision to invade Iraq. [MORE]

Momentum
PROUD TO BE A DEAD ARMADILLO
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "There's nothing in the middle of the road but a yellow line and dead armadillos," the Texas humorist and political writer Jim Hightower once famously said. In this election cycle, though, he's off by a mile. In the middle of the road today huddle liberals, progressives, old-fashioned conservative Republicans and most Democrats, and they're all scared out of their freaking minds. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
DESPITE NEW PRESS FREEDOM, EDITOR GOES TO JAIL
by Andreas Harsono

MIANGAS ISLAND, Indonesia, Sept. 18, 2004 - A Jakarta court decision to sentence an Indonesian editor to a year in prison for allegedly libeling a business tycoon may create a trend in this emerging democracy, whose criminal code offers plenty of opportunities for those who are not happy with the media to throw sloppy journalists in jail. [MORE]

Ink Soup
REAL HEDS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The headlines (or "heds," as we call 'em in the J biz) below are all genuine. [MORE]

On Media
2004 ELECTIONS ARE RIPE FOR HUMOR
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- It may well be that comedy will determine the 2004 election. In a culture where popular entertainment reaches more people than all the learned political journals do in a lifetime, this is not an entirely facetious observation. The only question is whether the decisive "killer joke" will come from the mouth of Jay Leno, David Letterman. Jon Stewart or the Web pages of CNN.com. [MORE]

On Native Ground
HOW SOON IS NOW?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Will someone please tell Sen. John Kerry and President Bush what year it is? [MORE]

Make My Day
LOVE AND POLITICS: STRANGE BEDFELLOWS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. - Hello, I'm Claire Townsend, and I'm running for U.S. Representative. I'll fight for the citizens of this state, and I won't take money from special interest lobbyists whose goal is to line their pockets and take away your rights. [MORE]

Momentum
BEING THANKFUL FOR SMALL FAVORS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In a time of despair like these, with an election season marked by lies, fears, and hatred, with hatred of America growing around the world, and with a lost war on terror that is also a lost war in Iraq, I try to look for small signs of good. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
CALIFORNIA'S LEGISLATURE STILL UNMOORED FROM REALITY
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Sept. 16, 2004 -- The mound of bad bills now sitting on Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's desk is testament to government dysfunction, written in black and white. The big difference this year is that Arnold may veto many stinkers, while Gray Davis tended to buckle. [MORE]

Ink Soup
TOENAILS AND KEROSENE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The children are back, thanks be to God. I don't mean my children-I mean those who go to the school that is just across a wide playing field directly behind my house. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
IN POLITICS, IT ALL COMES DOWN TO 'SO WHAT?!'
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. - George Washington chopped down a cherry tree and lied about it. Not a very honorable thing to do; yet, 30 or so years later he served this nation admirably becoming not only the first President of the United States but forever more known as the "Father of our Country." [MORE]

Market Mover
IS AMERICA POISED FOR A 'GREAT BULL RUN'?
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla.. Sept. 13, 2004 -- We are in the final stage of a 17-year bear market, and there are lots of reasons to believe we are poised for a bull rush, similar to the one which started back in 1987. [MORE]

Special Report
POSSIBLE A-TEST REPORTED IN NORTH KOREA
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Sept. 12, 2004 (5:20am EDT) -- Amid reports by the South Korean news agency Yonhap that a large "mushroom cloud" as much as 2.5 miles in diameter was seen near a northern military base in North Korea on Sept. 9, The Associated Press is reporting this morning that a vast explosion occurred at 11 a.m. Thursday in that nation's Yanggang province. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
INDONESIAN LEADERS STILL IN DENIAL AFTER EMBASSY BLAST
by Andreas Harsono

MAKASSAR, Indonesia, Sept. 11, 2004 -- Indonesia's number one man on terrorism, police chief Da'i Bachtiar, was having a meeting with a parliamentary commission Thursday morning, briefing them about his attempt to arrest master bombers Azahari Husin and Noordin Mohammad Top, when an aide approached him and whispered something into his ear. [MORE]

Reporting: Bangladesh
IN BANGLADESH, GARMENT WORKERS' PAYDAY NOT A SURE THING
by Syful Islam

DHAKA, Bangladesh, Sept. 11, 2004 -- The garment workers of Bangladesh may be the most deprived labor force in the world. Most of are paid only U.S.$14 to U.S.$16 per month, the lowest salary in the world, said Amirul Haq Amin, Coordinator of the Bangladesh Garment Workers Unity Council (BGWUC) on Thursday. [MORE]

On Native Ground
A CURE FOR REPUBLICAN LIES: ROOSEVELT'S IDEALS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- My antidote to the lies spewed out by Republicans at their convention last week was the words of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE BRAVE POSTURING OF ARMCHAIR WARRIORS
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- Soon after the American death toll in Iraq passed the 1,000 mark, I thought of Saadoun Hammadi and some oratory he provided two years ago when I spoke to him in Baghdad. [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT ABOUT 'EUROPEAN CARRYALL?'
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- If you fail to learn from history, you're doomed to repeat it. [MORE]

Momentum
YOU'VE COME A LONG WAY, BABY KILLER
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As a feminist I'm all for equal opportunity, but the idea of female suicide death squads makes me shiver. [MORE]

Ink Soup
ICH-I-RO!
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Being a Mariners fan for the last couple of years has been a matter of feeling sorry for the fans of all other baseball teams. Fans heavily invested in the fate of the M's could then walk about trying not to seem all that superior to the ordinary run of humanity. [MORE]

Hurricane Journal
INSIDE FRANCES: NO GAS, FREE ICE AND COLD, COLD CUTS
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Sept. 7, 2004 -- (Editor's Note: AR Correspondent Mark Scheinbaum weathered Hurricane Frances at his home in Lake Worth, Fla., near some of the hardest-hit coastal communities. Here is his piquant report). [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
A NATION WEEPS FOR INNOCENTS DEAD IN IRAQ
by Chiranjobi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, Sept. 7, 2004 -- An old Nepali saying, that "Tragedy never comes alone, it comes in a battalion," has never seemed more true in Nepal, where tragedy after tragedy has become the destiny of the nation. [MORE]

On Media
OLD FICTIONS AND NEW REALITIES
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- It was a week when the Longshoremen's union pulled 3,000 postcards from barrels containing 300,000 entries, the lucky winners getting entry level jobs on the docks. In Hollywood, movie buffs gathered for the annual Cinecon film festival. There is a linkage between the two items, subtle but significant, and it even bears on our upcoming election. [MORE]

Hurricane Journal
FRANCES FILLS THE SCREEN
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Sept. 5, 2004 (3:50am EDT) -- Unless things change pretty drastically between now and about 11 a.m. this morning, the small city where I live will be largely spared any devastation by Hurricane Frances. [MORE]

On Native Ground
HATS OFF TO THE PROTESTERS IN NEW YORK
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- For all the people that fretted about what would happen if hundreds of thousands of people came to New York to protest the Bush administration, Sunday's march through midtown Manhattan was a repudiation of those fears. [MORE]

Media Beat
ROVE'S BRAIN AND MEDIA MANIPULATION
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO - I just saw a horror movie - "Bush's Brain" - the new documentary based on a book with the same name by journalists James Moore and Wayne Slater. The book's subtitle is "How Karl Rove Made George W. Bush Presidential." I'll spare you the grim details. What matters most now is that Rove's long record of shady and vicious media operations is not just in the past. [MORE]

Make My Day
DO THEY GIVE GOLD MEDALS FOR COMPLAINING?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Every four years - called an Olympiad by us Olympic enthusiasts - I make a new resolution that I will start exercising more, and become a competitive athlete. Unfortunately, like every other resolution I make, this usually only lasts for three days after the Games end, and the new tv season starts up again. [MORE]

Momentum
ANDY WARHOL MEETS SMALL TOWN AMERICAN VALUES
by Joyce Marcel

BRATTLEBORO, Vt. -- One has to wonder. [MORE]

Ink Soup
HELP! THAT MAGAZINE IS FOLLOWING ME!
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE. Wash. -- It's in my blood, I suppose. A number of my ancestors were academics of one kind or another. One of my most treasured books, Leusden's Greek and Latin Testament (Philadelphia: Lippincott, 1858), belonged to Wm. D. McCorkle, who must have bequeathed to me the gene that caused me to major in Greek at Duke. [MORE]

On Media
PRINT VS. RADIO: A BATTLE IN THE HEARTLAND
by Robert Gelfand

DAYTON, Ohio -- As we taxi through Dayton International Airport, the pilot points out Air force One parked nearby. This is ground zero for the presidential campaign - if President George W. Bush loses Ohio, he can probably kiss the election goodbye. If Sen, John Kerry loses Ohio, he has that much more to make up in other states. Today, President Bush is visiting the Dayton suburb of Troy, Ohio. John Kerry has been all over the state the whole month. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE GOP STRATEGY: ATTACK, DISTORT, LIE, REPEAT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Here's the new definition of chutzpah. [MORE]


AN OPEN MIND, OR EMPTY HEAD?
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Perhaps it's unfair to compare the work of an intern at a small-town newspaper to that of best selling author Dan Brown (he of the Da Vinci Code fame) but compare I shall, because there is a deeper lesson involved. [MORE]

Make My Day
OLYMPICS, OLYMPICS, NEENER NEENER NEENER
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- We're winding down the final days of the Olympics, and while I don't think the 2004 games have carried the same emotional intensity as 1996 and 2000, there have still been some interesting stories over the past two weeks. [MORE]

Momentum
GOING FOR GOLD
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The Olympics have turned out to be the perfect antidote to the toxic pop culture in which we live today. [MORE]

Reporting: Dhaka
21 BOMBINGS IN BANGLADESH, BUT STILL NO SUSPECTS
by Syful Islam

DHAKA, Bangladesh, Aug. 25, 2004 -- This beleaguered is now unsafe for local people and foreigners. A six-year series of bombings have left hundreds dead, and police apparently no closer now than six years ago to catching the terrorists who have struck fear into the very heart of this young democracy. [MORE]

Ink Soup
IOTA OKRA
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- My late Aunt Helen (RIP) gave me her recipe for what in fact she did - avoiding Alzheimer's. Do crossword puzzles, she said. "You never find me sitting here doing nothing." She was also addicted to any game show on tv, especially those involving word play. I once telephoned her in the hospital during her last illness, and she cut me short: "Get to the point, honey-my program is on." [MORE]

Reporting: Los Angeles
MUSLIMS HONOR ALEC BALDWIN'S 'COURAGE AND CONSCIENCE'
by Ron Kenner

LOS ANGELES, Aug. 22, 2004 -- Actor and outspoken activist Alec Baldwin was hailed here Saturday night as one of the "voices of courage and conscience" who speak up for the right to criticize government without being impugned as unpatriotic. Baldwin was honored by the Muslim Public Affairs Council (MPAC) as the national organization's 13th annual Media Awards winner at the regal Biltmore Hotel in downtown Los Angeles. [MORE]

Market Mover

TALE OF THE TAPE TIPS A KERRY VICTORY

by Mark Scheinbaum

TAOS, N.M., Aug. 23, 2004 -- Highly-paid pundits say the presidential race is too close to call, but applying the old "Tale of the Tape" as boxing writers do, the election could produce a Kerry knockout and national Democratic win. [MORE]

On Native Ground
BOOTS AND FLAGS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Driving down Avenue A, the main drag in the Massachusetts village of Turners Falls, it's hard to miss the flags. [MORE]

Media Beat
HOW TO STOP WORRYING AND LEARN TO LOVE RUMSFELD
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The nation's top dog of war is frisky again. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld has returned to high visibility - after a couple of months in the media doghouse following revelations about torture at the Abu Ghraib prison - and is now openly romancing the journalistic pack with his inimitable style of "tough love" as he growls and romps across tv screens. [MORE]

Momentum
IF YOU ARE IN LABOR, PRESS 1
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Since my stepfather's death in Florida a few weeks ago, I've realized that it's much easier to die in America than it is to live. [MORE]

Make My Day
ANOTHER REASON NOT TO ORDER PEA SOUP
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- If I had to give one important piece of advice today, it would be this: Tip your waitstaff. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
TODAY IS NOW; LIFE IS WHAT'S NEXT
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Okay, so what is today? Today is the day we got a dog. BoPeep is the fourth Old English sheepdog we've had since 1958. Because she had blue eyes, we named the first one, "Lady Limehouse Blues" on her AKC "papers" but we called her "Limey." The next in line was BoPeep, then BoPeep, Jr., and now BoPeep III. [MORE]

On Media
HOW THE YALE MEN FLUNKED SCIENCE
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Well, President George W. Bush said something Thursday we ought to agree with, even if it wins the prize for the best ironic self-parody in an election year: "We need to keep facts, not politics, at the center of the debate." [MORE]

Hurricane Journal
CHARLEY BEARS DOWN, FLORIDA BEARS UP
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Aug. 13, 2004, 2:27amEST -- As Hurricane Charley grinds across the Cuban countryside and moves closer to the warm Gulf Of Mexico, where it is likely to pick up speed and may become a Category 3, about 350 miles north my condominium building in the middle of a resort golf course here is nearly empty. We are under a mandatory evacuation order that I am reluctant to obey, while my wife would like to flee to Georgia. My daughter, meanwhile, is convinced nothing will happen. [MORE]

On Native Ground
IT'S THE POST-INDUSTRIAL ECONOMY, STUPID!
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So now, even journalists aren't immune from the outsourcing juggernaut. [MORE]

On Media
HE WAS DIFFERENT THAN I EXPECTED
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The Democratic convention is over now and the John Kerry I saw is nothing like the portrait the media have been trying to sell me. Whether you support him or oppose him, you have to admit that he showed something powerful in his acceptance speech. [MORE]

Media Beat
FROM ATTICA TO ABU GHRAIB - AND A PRISON NEAR YOU
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- A recent obituary in the New York Times told about Frank Smith, "who as an inmate leader at Attica prison was tortured by officers in the aftermath of the prisoner uprising of 1971 and then spent a quarter century successfully fighting for legal damages." Working as a paralegal after his release, Smith was a pivotal force behind a 26-year civil action lawsuit that won a $12 million settlement. [MORE]

Momentum
AN UNCONVENTIONAL WEEK
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- My convention may have been different from yours. [MORE]

On Native Ground
TO WIN, DEMOCRATS MUST BE BOLD AND THINK BIG
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "Sometimes, from the point of the activist, the perfect becomes the enemy of the good." [MORE]

Market Mover
THE PREZ WHO CRIED "WOLF?"
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, FL (3 Aug 04)--The Washington Post, New York Times, and some of my old colleagues from the loose knit UPI alumni club, are wondering whether the latest elections season "terror alert" is a case of a President or an administration who cried "Wolf." [MORE]

American Sports
U.S.C., NOTRE DAME DOMINATE COLLEGE FOOTBALL, SPORTS HISTORY
by Steven Travers

LOS ANGELES -- The 2004 college football season starts this month, and all indications are that Pete Carroll and his University of Southern California Trojans are poised to become the greatest collegiate team of all time. [MORE]

On Native Ground

WHEN WILL A REAL DEMOCRAT RUN FOR PRESIDENT?

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In talking to people around where I live, there's a distinct lack of enthusiasm for John Kerry. [MORE]

Make My Day
STICKS AND STONES MAY BREAK MY BONES
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- It takes a lot to get politicians in an uproar. They're generally pretty easy going, level-headed, and not prone to immature outbursts about silly issues. [MORE]

John Kerry tonight: "The future doesn't belong to fear. It belongs to freedom."

On the Campaign Trail
FOR A BETTER VANTAGE POINT, STAY HOME

by Joe Shea

BOSTON, July 28, 2004 -- The Rev. Al Sharpton has just wound up a long, passionate and eloquent speech that brought thousands of delegates to the Democratic National Convention here at the Fleet Center to their feet waving arms and signs and and cheering their lungs out, and now Sen. Bob Graham of Florida has taken Sharpton's place. Graham is not an evangelist but a very good speaker. The problem, though, is this: How many speeches, regardless of their quality, can you listen to in four days? [MORE]

On The Campaign Trail
BY AND FOR A NEW WORLD
by Joe Shea

BOSTON, July 27, 2004 -- American history has come to a stage at which the nation must make critical choices about its future. Thus, Sen. Hillary Clinton of New York told thousands of cheering delegates here last night, U.S. Sen. John Kerry "is a serious man ... for a serious time." [MORE]

On The Campaign Trail
BOSTON IS A MOVEABLE FEAST
by Joe Shea

BOSTON, July 26, 2004 -- Besides nominating John Kerry for President, beating the hated Yankees with their own scrappy style of hardball and breaking all records for torn-up streets, Bostonians and the delegates to the Democratic National Convention here are busting a lot of Atkins-hardened dieter's hearts. [MORE]

On Media
A TWIN CITIES EXPERIMENT IN E-POLITICS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Looking back to the moment in 1996 when Bob Dole hastily recited a Website address in a presidential debate, then forward to the Dean campaign, it is clear that Internet usage is developing into a significant part of our political system. We might consider an experiment begun ten years ago in Minnesota as the prototype for use of the Internet in politics. The results are worthy of examination. [MORE]

On Native Ground
'OUTFOXED' AND THE MYTH OF THE LIBERAL MEDIA
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Along with about 100 other people, I crammed myself into a small, stuffy room on the campus of the School for International Training in Brattleboro, Vt., on Sunday night to see a screening of "Outfoxed," Robert Greenwald's documentary about the Fox News Channel. [MORE]

Momentum
AT WAR WITH SUMMER
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Honeysuckle, climbing roses, day lilies, bee balm, lavender, flowering clematis, black-eyed Susans, cosmos, pansies and petunias. [MORE]

Ink Soup
WASTE PAPER
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Pasted to the mirror in my bathroom is a strip of paper with the typed words: "Object in mirror is exactly as far away as he seems." One of the things that make him seem less far, at least to himself, is his journal. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WHAT MAKES A HERO?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- On May 6, 1954, a little over 50 years ago, we learned that Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile. That record still holds more interest than any other for runners of the race. He was first; Chris Brasher was ahead early on, but Roger won the race. Chris who? That's right. Second place in the same event did not create a household name. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WANT TO BE PRESIDENT? GO TO RICHMOND, QUICKLY
by Joe Shea

RICHMOND, Va., July 18, 2004 -- If Sen. John Kerry wants to be elected President of the United States, he'd better hurry down to the Sidewalk café on Main St. here and talk to Jeff McCarthy, the bartender. "I'm not going to make up my mind until two minutes before I go into the polling booth," he said. It's Jeff McCarthy - and millions like him around the country - who holds the key to the 2004 presidential election. He's the one that everyone is after. [MORE]

On Media
IT'S TIME FOR SOME PAYBACK
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Whoopi Goldberg did a few jokes about the President and within days she got fired. Once again the Right taught us an important lesson that the left and center still refuse to learn. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE ANTEBANG
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- What was there before the Big Bang? This question has tormented such great thinkers as our President ("I'll tell you what there was. There was the terrorist conspiracy to commit the Big Bang. But fortunately we got word of it in time, thanks to our incomparable intelligence agencies and like that. So it never happened.") [MORE]

Media Beat
TRIAL BALLOONS, TERROR, AND THE ELECTION
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Tom Ridge, the federal official in charge of defending the United States against terrorism, was on message when he told a July 14 news conference: "We don't do politics at Homeland Security." Such high-level claims of patriotic purity have been routine since 9/11. But in this election year, they're more ludicrous than ever. [MORE]

On Native Ground
PANTS ON FIRE AT THE MINISTRY OF FEAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's funny how many times over the past three years that "terrorist" threats have popped up whenever the Bush administration either wants something or is trying to distract people from its problems. [MORE]

Thought: Iran may have been behind 9/11 all along.

On The Campaign Trail
SLURS AND SPEED TRAPS: THE 'OLD SOUTH' REARS ITS UGLY HEAD

by Joe Shea

WINDER, Ga., July 17, 2004 -- The McDonald's at the corner of Hwy. 11 in Winder, Ga., seems an unlikely place to re-encounter the Old South. But here, on the inside of the men's room stall in the tiny bathroom, is evidence in the form of messages scratched into the formica some time ago. F*CK U NIGGERS, says one; F*CK WHITE TRASH MOTHER F*KERS, says another; here and there are the familiar initials KKK; in between and around those are several swastikas. Equal opportunity hate is appraently alive and well in Winder. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A TRIGGERING OF THE IMAGINATION
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Imagine! That word usually sends me off into the netherworld of fairy dust and the wee people. Not tonight. Tonight my imagination has been triggered through a televised preview announcing "4400," an upcoming program about the return of 4,400 people who disappeared 60 years ago and returned all at once ... not having aged a day. They left; they returned, in this science fiction world of story-telling. [MORE]

On Media

THE 'CREDIBILITY GAP' RETURNS

by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- When it comes to homeland security, the media might consider dusting off a term that was used during the Lyndon Johnson administration: "the credibility gap." How else to explain the almost comically skeptical reaction to warnings from the Attorney General about impending catastrophes, or to changes in the national stoplight from yellow to orange? [MORE]

Media Beat
KERRY-EDWARDS' STANCE FOR U.S. JOBS IRKS THE PRESS - BUT WHY?
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The morning after Sen. John Kerry announced that North Carolina Sen. John Edwards will be his running mate, powerful newspapers fired warning shots across the bow of the Kerry-Edwards campaign. [MORE]

BANGLADESHI FIRM MISUSED TRADE CREDITS, U.S., E.U. CHARGE
by Syful Islam

DHAKA, Bangladesh -- A number of Bangladeshi exporters are allegedly involved in misuse of Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) facilities that grants duty-free export to some developed countries, including the U.S. and the European Union, official sources said. [MORE]

An American Reporter Special Report
The Triumph of Michael Moore

Moore's Triumph
MOORE'S FILM CAPTURES WHAT BIG MEDIA MISS

by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- Much of the establishment press has been especially critical of Michael Moore. In the past few days, it has questioned every line in his third documentary, "Fahrenheit 9/11." His film attacks President George W. Bush, the Bush Administration, corporate America, and the media. It has been called propaganda and manipulative; Moore has been called obnoxious, arrogant, and detestable. His film is expected to top the $100 million mark in box-office sales, an all-time record for a documentary. [MORE]

Moore's Triumph
WE NEED 'M0ORE' SUBJECTIVITY IN JOURNALISM
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I went to see Michael Moore's "Fahrenheit 9/11" over the July 4 weekend. [MORE]

Moore's Triumph
MORE THOUGHTS ON MICHAEL MOORE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Say what you want about Michael Moore and his "Fahrenheit 9/11," but he certainly makes you think. [MORE]

Moore's Triumph
TWO OTHER POLITICAL FILMS WE OUGHT TO SEE
by Maggie Burns

HOUSTON -- A lot can ride on political movies, aside from Michael Moore's work. On July 20, PBS stations will air a new documentary, "Last Man Standing: Politics Texas Style," shown for obvious reasons at the Texas state Democratic convention in Houston, June 2004. This amusing film is a good lesson in national politics at the local level, with Lyndon Baines Johnson's old hometown as part of the microcosm, or anyway the setting. [MORE]

American Essay
TOWARDS A NEW AMERICAN SPACE AGE
by Rick Tumlinson

LOS ANGELES -- The June 21 flight of Burt Rutan's SpaceShipOne signals the true beginning of a new American space age. As NASA tries to rcover from the loss of Columbia, a small white rocketship rose into the darkness of space above the California desert. Not quite crossing into the realm of orbital space, yet truly in space, where the stars shine in daytime and the freedom of weightlessness begins, Burt Rutan's SpaceShipOne made history and changed the future. [MORE]

Make My Day
MAKING TECHNOLOGY EASY
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I used to be a technology whiz when I was younger. I could explain the difference between digital and analog stereo systems. I could explore the inner workings of my Macintosh computer. And I even knew how to program my VCR -- no mean feat 15 years ago. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
FOR REMOTE INDONESIAN VILLAGE, PRESIDENTIAL RECOUNT IS ONE MORE PROBLEM
by Andreas Harsono

TETEWANG VILLAGE, Halmahera, Indonesia, July 7, 2004 -- When Johny Punene began to shout out the presidential vote tally in front of his fellow villagers on Monday morning, neither Punene nor his audience, mostly fishermen and clove farmers, were expecting a recount. [MORE]

Reporting: Bangladesh
UNDER U.S. PRESSURE, BANGLADESH MULLS UNION RULES
by Syful Islam

DHAKA, Bangladesh-- The government of Bangladesh has introduced a bill in parliament seeking limited rights to trade unionism in exclusive industrial zones after faced pressure from from American labor unions to adopt them or lose trade concessions. The bill is to be reported out of a parliamentary committee tomorrow, sources said. [MORE]

Ink Soup
WHO WHOM?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Are you irritated by mistakes in English? So am I, though I constantly remind myself that, if there had never been any "mistakes" in English, then we would be speaking the language of Chaucer, to go only that far back. [MORE]

On Media
REGULATORY ALPHABET SOUP IS HEALTH FOOD
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The July 4 crowd at Cabrillo Beach in San Pedro was in the thousands. I wondered how many of them ever heard the terms NPDES or SUSMP? Yet these obscure acronyms, almost never reported in the local press, are vitally important to the quality of the water that beachgoers splash in so naively. [MORE]

On Native Ground

IRAQIS WANT REAL GOVERNMENT, NOT PUPPET SHOWS

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So, now the Iraqis have sovereignty.* [MORE]

Reporting: Bangladesh

BANGLADESH MOVES TO RESTRICT CHEMICAL WEAPONS

by Syful Islam

DHAKA, Bangladesh -- Bangladesh is now preparing to enact a law to regulate the proliferation of chemical weapons. The draft of the bill to control the proliferation of chemical weapons is now at a final stage, informed sources told The American Reporter this week. [MORE]

Make My Day
TRAVEL TRIPS FOR THE 'NEW TRAVELER'
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Dear fellow traveler: You may not remember me from this morning. I'm the guy you cut off both in the parking lot and again at the airport. You took my parking space, and then ran to get in front of me at the ticket line. You also rolled your suitcase over my foot and didn't even apologize. [MORE]

Momentum
WHEN MADMEN RULE THE ASYLUM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Like all people of good faith - and surely this means Muslims as well as Christians, Jews, Buddhists and atheists - the recent beheadings of hostages in the Middle East have left me outraged and repelled. [MORE]

Reporting: Bangladesh
U.S. ROLE IS CRITICIZED IN BANGLADESH
by Syful Islam

DHAKA, Bangladesh -- Speakers at an international conference on Tuesday criticized the rich countries, especially the United States, saying that the scenario of implementation of "poor and rich country partnership" to achieve the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) has frustrated the poor countries. [MORE]

On Media
SCIENTIFIC IGNORANCE SHOULD NOT BE A VIRTUE
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- John Allen Paulos wrote a book called Innumeracy and became a best-selling author. There ought to be a book about scientific illiteracy with a similarly clever title. [MORE]

On Native Ground
POLITICS IS NOT A SPECTATOR SPORT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "People often say, with pride, 'I'm not interested in politics.' They might as well say, 'I'm not interested in my standard of living, my health, my job, my rights, my freedoms, my future or any future.' Politics is the business of being governed and nobody can escape being governed, for better or worse. ... If we mean to keep any control over our world and lives, we must be interested in politics." [MORE]

Momentum
I KNOW WHY THE CAGED CAT PURRS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- No one knows why cats purr. No one knows how cats purr. But most of us know how to make a cat purr. [MORE]

Make My Day
HOW TO WRITE
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Despite my complaints that I don't have many readers or get enough feedback from them, I actually have some great readers who write to me on a regular basis. [MORE]

Ink Soup
NOW THIS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The Mariners have runners at first and third with one out. The score at the top of the fifth is M's 2, Pirates 0. This news is brought to you by Bud Lite, whoever he is. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WHEN IS A PROSTITUTE NOT A PROSTITUTE?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. - The answer to that question is easy; when the prostitute is addressed as Mr. President. There is an analogy here and I won't keep you waiting for it to show up. Instead, I'll tell you the old story that reveals this sage truth. [MORE]

On Media
A SITE THAT DOES SOME HEAVY LIFTING
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- If you still think that Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Bill O'Reilly and their imitators are credible sources of information, I invite you to look at Media Matters for America. This new Website (http://mediamatters.org) will prove to be a treasure trove for journalists and liberal partisans even if it fails to make anybody's top-ten list for readability. [MORE]

On Native Ground
ON TORTURE, IS BUSH ABOVE THE LAW?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Now that the funeral of President Ronald Reagan is over, we can turn our attention to other matters, such as how many members of the Bush administration will be facing war crimes charges. [MORE]

Momentum
WORLD PEACE, ONE FRIENDSHIP AT A TIME
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When I read that John A. Wallace died last Friday at the age of 88, it brought back many memories. Not of him, but of the institution he founded which changed my life, the School for International Training, a part of World Learning, Inc. in Brattleboro, Vt. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE BUG THAT SAVED SEATTLE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I am out on the deck, gazing at the vast tranquillity that is the Puget Sound and at the Olympics, the travel agent's dream of a snowy mountain range, just beyond. [MORE]

On Media
A POLITICAL RORSCHACH TEST FOR THE A.C.L.U.
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The ink blot test named after Hermann Rorschach has become controversial among psychologists in recent decades, but I think the underlying idea has some validity as applied to politics. How else should we view the recent brouhaha over the Los Angeles County Seal? [MORE]

Brasch Words
CALIFORNIA DREAMIN': AN ENCOUNTER WITH RONALD REAGAN
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- I never voted for Ronald Reagan. Not the first time he ran for governor in 1966, nor for his re-election in 1970. I didn't vote for him for president in 1980 or 1984. But, it was Mr. Reagan who was responsible for me becoming involved in my first political race. [MORE]

Passings: Ronald Reagan
A DOVE AND A SONNET
by Joe Shea

I wonder if there isn't someone out there watching the endless procession of mourners filing past President Ronald Reagan's coffin as it lies in state in the Capitol Rotunda saying over and over to themselves, as each new tear-streaked face is caught for a moment by the C-Span camera, "Fools! Fools! Fools!" It is the irony of ironies that this wise soul will have to say those words a hundred million times. [MORE]

Momentum
I LOVE A PARADE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Something about a parade makes me cry and I don't know why. [MORE]

American Essay
WHY NADER'S WRONG TO RUN
by John Pearce

MILL VALLEY, Valif. -- The most urgent political question facing any progressive this year is whom we should work for and vote for in the presidential election. Ralph Nader offers positions on the issues far closer to the hearts of most of us. But this year, for nearly all progressives, one issue supersedes all others: beating President George Bush. [MORE]

On Native Ground
RONALD REAGAN WITHOUT TEARS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The treacle being spewed out by the press about the death of former President Ronald Reagan has been hard to take. [MORE]

On Media
WHO OWNS YOUR E-MAIL ADDRESS?
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Sometimes it seems that spam-email has joined death and taxes on the list of inevitables. Who controls the use of your email address? A struggle in the small Los Angeles suburb of Mar Vista is exposing some of the issues. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
ROADS OF MEMORY, TAKEN ONCE AGAIN
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Everybody looks back at one time or another; when my children gaze into their rear-view mirror, they see scenes of their lives and their world in the seventies, eighties, nineties, and the few years since the millennium. [MORE]

JOURNEY TO TAJ MAHAL EVOKES THOUGHTS ON WOMEN OF OLD & NEW INDIA
by Larry Bridwell

NEW DELHI -- When an evening drive to the Taj Mahal - a monument to a 16th-century Mughal Empress - turned into a foggy overnight and early morning adventure, I was introduced to the spiritual tranquility of the historic India. But a visit to an extraordinary new college that is changing the lives of traditional Indian women, whom religion and need sometimes conspire to suppress, showed how modern India is slowly making amends. [MORE]

On Native Ground
HOW AHMED CHALABI CONNED THE NEO-CONS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's a question almost too heartbreaking to contemplate. Was this whole sorry mess that America finds itself in in Iraq the product of a massive mind game by the Iranians? [MORE]

Make My Day
THAT'S NOT A BAT, THIS IS A BAT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Teaching is a noble profession, one that should attract the best and brightest to a rewarding career. Schools are filled with people who became teachers with the dream of shaping young minds and encouraging lifelong learning. [MORE]

American Travel
KEY WEST A WARM WINTER'S TALE FOR WRITERS
by Larry Bridwell

NEW YORK -- Key West first came to my attention in a 1984 Wall Street Journal article about the Key West Literary Seminar. The story described the seminar's exquisite intellectual stimulation in a setting of outdoor cocktails and glorious island sunsets. [MORE]

Momentum
THE UNBEARABLE LIGHTNESS OF DAFFODILS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Daffodils can break your heart in so many lovely ways. [MORE]

Ink Soup
LIFE, TOP OF THE EIGHTH
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The fingers typing this 998th Ink Soup came into the world exactly 75 years ago today, 31 May 1929. [MORE]

Make My Day
NOW THAT I HAVE YOUR ATTENTION
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. - What are you thinking of right at this moment? [MORE]

Editorial
PROUD, BLOODY AND UNBOWED
by Joe Shea

As I prayed for them at Mass Sunday evening, my cousin Paul Michael Roberts and my friends Phil Ruminski and Richard Marsh came out of the ether happy to see me, their arms linked as mine reached into their world, joining us in a happy moment of remembrance that inspires me tonight. Paul was my gentle and happy cousin, Phil a genuinely talented young artist, and Richard a young person of great integrity. Each taught me a lesson in life, and each has become a special part of me in death. I wish I visited more often. [MORE]

On Native Ground
EARTH TO BUSH: FACE REALITY, END THE OCCUPATION
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The Bush White House has begun yet another public relations campaign to convince Americans that the invasion and occupation of Iraq is a just cause. [MORE]

Momentum
WHO DO YOU LOVE? HOW DO YOU LOVE?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Here's a rock-solid truth that our culture tries to deny: we don't choose the people we love. [MORE]

Market Mover
LESSONS LEARNED FROM BOCA TO RATON
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., May 26,2004 -- Some day I'll write a book and call it "From Boca to Raton." [MORE]

On Media
AN EFFECTIVE VOICE FOR LIBERALS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- It's probably the most influential magazine that nobody's ever heard of. About the size and weight of your average comic book, its contributors include James Fallows, Jonathan Alter, Tom Bethell and Gregg Easterbrook. Its alumni have gone on to distinguished careers at mainstream magazines and journals while contributing influential books of their own along the way. [MORE]

On Native Ground
SEARCHING FOR SCAPEGOATS AT ABU GHRAIB
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse scandal is heading down a well-trod path. [MORE]

Momentum
A FAILURE OF JOURNALISM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When I was working in daily journalism, I continually irritated the night editors with my frantic calls begging them to change a word in a story or make a sentence clearer. And I would often wake up in the middle of the night, panicked that I had misattributed a quote or gotten a tax figure wrong. [MORE]

On Media
MICHAEL MOORE TURNS THE TABLES
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- It's hard to say which was more striking, the Disney hypocrisy or Michael Moore's shameless publicity mongering. Either way, its a laugh riot all the way to Cannes. [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT A WAY TO MAKE A LIVING
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Now that I've started a new job, I find myself getting up earlier, well before the crack of noon. [MORE]

Ink Soup
UFF DA!
Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Confession time: my dateline is a lie forced upon me by the post office. Where I actually live is Ballard, one of the many neighborhoods of Seattle with a strong sense of its own identity. [MORE]

On Native Ground
TORTURE IN IRAQ: A FAILURE OF LEADERSHIP
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I have only a modicum of experience as a soldier, but I remember one piece of advice I got from a first sergeant in one of the infantry companies I served with: "It's the private's job to f**k up. It's the sergeant's job not to let him." [MORE]

Momentum
WHICH SIDE ARE YOU ON?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Say it's 1770 in the Colonies. Tempers are starting to boil over land ownership, taxes and debt-collecting. Yet many are thriving under the rule of the English king, George III. It's treason and heresy to publicly damn him. Are you a Whig or a Tory? Which side are you on? [MORE]

Media Beat
THE COMING BACKLASH AGAINST IRAQ TORTURE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Looking at visual images from U.S.-run prisons in Iraq, news watchers now find themselves in the midst of a jolting experience that roughly resembles a process described by Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld: "It is the photographs that gives one the vivid realization of what actually took place. Words don't do it. ... You see the photographs, and you get a sense of it, and you cannot help but be outraged." [MORE]

Make My Day
MY ROD AND REEL, THEY COMFORT ME
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- As spring gets warmer, and the days grow longer, that can only mean one thing: Fishing! [MORE]

Editorial
TO MOM, ON HER 90TH BIRTHDAY
by Joe Shea

Today my mother achieves a summit of 90 years. It must give her a certain feeling of pride to have seen so much of humanity's sprawling genius exercise itself on her watch, to have watched her child, her 20th Century, the cornucopia of endless riches, spill so much treasure before her, like her five children spilling so much milk on so many childhood tables, in her simple passage of a single life. [MORE]

Ink Soup
OF TREES AND THE TREE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I had every intention, as the intentionless always say, of writing a column full of fury against the conditions in the prison where we have finally shown Saddam Hussein who is who, when I was saved by timely echoes from Princeton. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
SPINNING OUT OF CONTROL
Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Every day it's something else. Today I woke to the news that cicadas are coming. I remember those pesky large beetle-like insects that have a way of climbing all over your house and yard while the male vibrates membranes on his belly and the drum-roaring sound wakes every sleeping thing all night long. I thought they were gone for good with the advent of DDT and Raid but I discovered they are not seasonal - unless you count 17 years between plagues a season. [MORE]

On Media
WHAT DID HE KNOW, AND WHEN DID HE KNOW IT?
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- By now the Abu Ghraib Prison scandal is old news, but it may signify something of importance back home - the awakening of the long dormant American press. All that remains is the ritual incantation, "What did the president know, and when did he know it?" [MORE]

Brasch Words
BUSH IS RUNNING THE SHIP OF STATE AGROUND
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa., May 7, 2004 -- Let's pretend it's wartime, and the nation's largest aircraft carrier has just run aground. [MORE]

On Native Ground
FAITH MEETS REALITY, AND REALITY LOSES
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So, this is what we've got to look forward to. [MORE]

Guest Commentary
FALLUJAH: HIGH TIDE OF EMPIRE?
by Pat Buchanan

WASHINGTON -- At Versailles, 1919, Lloyd George, having seized oil-rich Iraq for the empire, offered Woodrow Wilson mandates over Armenia and Constantinople. "When you cease to be President we will make you Grand Turk," laughed Clemenceau. [MORE]

Momentum
THE GRIN THAT DESTROYS THE WORLD
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "Men heap together all the mistakes of their lives and create a monster called Destiny," Oliver Wendell Holmes once wrote, and now Destiny has arrived at the door of the United States. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
SHAME ON THEM; SHAME ON US
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This is not a news story. Readers can find the facts as they spin out of control in the media. What you'll read here is a full measure of disgust and outrage spewing forth as my fingers speed across this keyboard. [MORE]

Commentary
'SYSTEMIC' IRAQ ABUSE EXTENDS TO THE TRUTH
by John Janney

MOBILE, Ala. -- While prisoner abuse by coalition forces have been reported since the invasion of Afghanistan and well into the invasion of Iraq, it took photographs of American and British soldiers and mercenaries gleefully torturing and humiliating Iraqi prisoners before anyone took these reports seriously. [MORE]

Ink Soup
ADVICE TO AUTHORS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- On the wall next to this computer is a small memo to myself:
ODYSSEUS, March
STALIN, April
GOD, May
. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
SHAME ON THEM; SHAME ON U.S.
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This is not a news story. Readers can find the facts as they spin out of control in the media. What you'll read here is a full measure of disgust and outrage spewing forth as my fingers speed across this keyboard. [MORE]

Market Mover
AND NOW PLAYING IN PANAMA: TORRIJOS II
by Mark Scheinbaum

MIAMI. May 3, 2004 -- Unofficial returns show that Martin Torrijos, son of the late Panamanian strongman Gen. Omar Torrijos has trounced three major opponents to win the presidency of the Central American nation. [MORE]

On Media
25 WAYS TO DISTORT THE TRUTH
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The Bush campaign has come up with a new twist on how to distort and deceive. As evidence, let us consider an ad from Bush-Cheney '04, Inc. called "Tell the Truth." [MORE]

Make My Day
QUIET BACK THERE!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- "Hey, quiet down back there!" [MORE]

On Native Ground
LIFTING THE SHROUD OF SECRECY ON BUSH'S WAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - President George W. Bush didn't have a problem with using a photograph of a flag-draped body bag being carried from the ruins of the World Trade Center in New York City for his first commercial of the campaign season. [MORE]

Momentum
HER BEAUTIFUL MIND
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What could be behind the Bush Administration's decision to censor the photographs of flag-draped coffins returning from Iraq? Could it really be, as the government says, to respect "the privacy of the families?" Or is it to hide the realities of war for political reasons? Or is it to protect the delicate sensitivities of the ruling class as Americans die to build them an empire? [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A MOTE IN THE EYE OF THE G-8 STORM
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. - The calm before the storm is filled with foreboding as you watch and wait, feeling your way around for some picture of what is to come - and there's none. [MORE]

Ink Soup
A TALE MURDER IN NASSAU HALL
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- First, a declaration of interest. I am well acquainted with Ann Waldron, the author of this book, and it was in fact she who sent it to me - though without (as if this were a guarantee of my impartiality) an inscription. [MORE]

On Media
FREEDOM TO DO WHAT?
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- A series of recent cases inspires this question regarding freedom of the press: What is it the freedom to do, exactly? These cases involve the clash of fundamental rights as judges, lawyers and the media fight for competing interests. [MORE]

On Native Ground
MAKING THE MONSTER
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So many mistakes have been by the Bush administration in Iraq and Afghanistan that it's hard to know where to begin. [MORE]

Media Beat
THAT'S COUNTRY JOE, SO THIS MUST BE VIETNAM
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -Taking the stage at a community center in the small Northern California town of Bolinas, a group of four musicians quickly showed themselves to be returning as a vibrant creative force centered very much in the present. [MORE]

Make My Day
IT'S NATIONAL APRIL MONTH!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Most people think April is one of the more boring months of the year. After all, we only get April Fool's Day, and sometimes Easter, plus it rains for 28 of the 30 days. However, most people don't realize April is filled with all kinds of holidays, festivals, and celebrations that allow us to celebrate each of April's 30 days. [MORE]

Momentum
THE GOLDEN MEAN IS GONE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Did Barry Goldwater mean to kick Aristotle in the seat of his pants when he accepted the Republican Party's presidential nomination in 1964 by saying, "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice and moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue?" [MORE]

Editorial
THE KIDS THE PRESIDENT LEFT BEHIND ON SEPT. 11
by Joe Shea

SARASOTA, Fla., April 21, 2004 -- Nobody has thought very much about the children who got a reading lesson from President George Bush the day Al-Qaeda attacked the United States. But results of Florida's much-despised FCAT statewide third-grade reading tests suggests that the President didn't inspire his students on that day to become better readers. [MORE]

Ink Soup
PERHAPS EVEN THIS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Forsan et haec olim meminisse iuvabit. (One day it might be pleasant to recall even these things). This line from Virgil, quoted in a recent New York Times profile of my old Princeton colleague and friend Bob Fagles, is the motto for today's Soup. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A HEART FULL OF IRONY
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga., April 20, 2004 - McDonald Corporation's Chairman and CEO Jim Cantalupo died yesterday in Orlando, Florida. The news reports were all about the sudden death from apparent heart attack, not mentioning what was being served at this bi-annual franchisee meeting of the fast food pioneer. Nor did anyone offer Cantalupo's health history. His death came "out of nowhere," those at the meeting said, many of them crying. [MORE]

On Media
NOT MUCH 'PRESS' IN THIS CONFERENCE
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Why presidential press conferences are not viewed as a national embarrassment, I am at a loss to explain. The abject performance by the world press at the April 13, 2004, presidential news conference can be favorably compared only to the disingenuous collection of cliches, excuses and denials made by the President. [MORE]

Lionel Rolfe
RELIGION, POLITICS AND BUSH'S 'GANG OF FOUR'
by Lionel Rolfe

LOS ANGELES -- They're the most unappetizing gang of hypocrites and liars ever, these spawn of the "Reagan Revolution." We're talking about Rush Limbaugh, Newt Gingrich, Jerry Fallwell and Rep. Henry Hyde. [MORE]

On Native Ground
BUSH MUST CONFRONT HIS MESS IN IRAQ
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Last year, we heard the gloating. [MORE]

Momentum
AMERICA REAPS THE WHIRLWIND
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- For his Christmas card last year, Vice President Dick Cheney used a quote by Benjamin Franklin: "And if a sparrow cannot fall to the ground without His notice, is it probable that an empire can rise without His aid?" [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
NEPALESE DEMOCRACY IN PERIL AS SITUATION DETERIORATES
by Chiranjobi audyal

Kathmandu, April 12, 2004 -- The political situation in Nepal is deteriorating day by day due to the growing rift between the nation's democratic parties and its King as it faces the problem of Maoists guerrillas fighting to establish a republic state and replace its fragile parliamentary democracy. [MORE]

Ink Soup
HAPPY EASTER?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- Encouraged by the universal acclaim that has greeted the presidential candidacy of Ralph Nader, Dr. Soup has just announced his own campaign for the White House. [MORE]

On Media
TRADING OUR WAY TO RUIN
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif -- Each day I look out my window and watch the trade imbalance accumulate. From a hillside overlooking Los Angeles Harbor, I can see freighters loaded down with cargo containers coming in from across the Pacific. Container ships also leave here headed for the Asian ports. What most people don't realize is that more than half of the containers they carry are going back empty. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE PROVERBIAL BOTTOM LINE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- The bottom line - the proverbial bottom line - is that even if we knew what we're trying to get National Security Advisor Condoleeza Rice to tell us she knew, we would not have believed it. I would not have believed those young men described as looking like dentists on a holiday could be so confident in their plans that they would carry them out without a hitch. [MORE]

Market Mover
BILL OF RIGHTS: IMBEDDED, INDEBTED, REGRETTED?
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- Critics of radio trash mouth Howard Stern might want to put a cork in it for a few minutes - and the champagne, too. [MORE]

The American Reporter
April 10, 1995 - April 10, 2004
"Making A Place for Independent Journalism"

Editorial
CELEBRATING OUR NINTH ANNIVERSARY

by Joe Shea

The American Reporter today celebrates the ninth anniversary of its founding and begins its tenth year of progress. There were many who said when we started in 1995 that we would not last more than a few weeks, a few months, a few years; we have outlasted all of those. [MORE]

On Native Ground
MERCENARIES IN IRAQ: OUTSOURCING A CORPORATE WAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The murder and mutilation of four employees of Blackwater Security Consulting in Fallujah on March 31 brought to light something that the Bush administration would rather you didn't know about - that it is outsourcing more and more of the occupation of Iraq to mercenaries. [MORE]

Make My Day
HOW ABOUT "LOOK, WE NEED TO TALK ... ?"
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- How badly do you have to dislike someone that the only way to dump them is with a bomb threat? I mean, it's one thing to stand someone up for a date, but it's an entirely different matter to call an airport, not once, but seven times, and say "There's a bomb in the airport." [MORE]

Media Beat
AMERICA'S MONOPOLY ON STRATEGIC VIOLENCE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- With warfare escalating in Iraq, syndicated columnist George Will has just explained the logic of the occupation. "In the war against the militias," he wrote, "every door American troops crash through, every civilian bystander shot - there will be many - will make matters worse, for a while. Nevertheless, the first task of the occupation remains the first task of government: to establish a monopoly on violence." [MORE]

Momentum
IN IRAQ, OUR HAND IS IN THE FIRE NOW
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As Iraq burns, how can I not ask: if I knew way back then, why didn't they? [MORE]

Breaking News
VOTERS SHUT DOWN WAL-MART PLOY
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., April 7, 2004 -- With about 15 percent of the vote counted in Inglewood, Calif., voters there have overwhelmingly rejected the construction of a Wal-Mart at a site near the Hollywood Park racetrack and the Forum. [MORE]

Ink Soup
AND ANOTHER THING
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The high temperature in Seattle yesterday was 78. Today it is in the upper fifties, I would guess. It is an adorable climate, Seattle's. It doesn't want to hurt anyone, just to keep people amused and satisfied, within limits. It reminds me of some kid about whom ugly rumors have circulated, so he goes out of his way to be nice to everyone, especially old people. I am seriously thinking of mentioning Seattle's weather in my will. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
IN DALEY HOUSEHOLD, ACRONYMS 'R' US
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- "WAC" was the first acronym I remember but I'm sure they are not new to my generation - and for the benefit of those who call women in the military service "soldiers" instead of WAC's, for Women's Army Corps, I'll spell it out. The acronym WAF was for women in the air force and Wave's were women in the Navy, not an acronym here but an obvious choice for women serving on the high seas. [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
AFTER NEPAL CLASH, TEARS, TERROR AND MANY DEAD
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

BENI, Nepal, April 5, 2004 -- The decomposing bodies of Maoists, soldiers and local people - some still not yet consigned to the graves hurriedly dug for them l;ast week - around the small town of Beni, are a constant reminder to villagers here of the fierce fighting between security forces and the Maoist guerrillas that erupted suddenly on the night of March 20 and continued into the next day. [MORE]

On Media
LIBERAL RADIO IS FINALLY ON THE AIR
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Is it the triumphant revival of a robust liberalism or will it be another political disaster? Air America Radio is that long awaited invention, a national radio network designed to oppose the power of conservative talk radio epitomized by Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity and Bill O'Reilly. [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
U.S. MICROWAVE WEAPON GOING TO IRAQ, EXPERT SAYS
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., April 1, 2004 -- The United States has decided to deploy a $40-million, futuristic non-lethal microwave weapons system that can burn but not blind crowds and combatants at several hundred yards, according to official notice given to retired U.S. Army Col. John Alexander, a consultant to U.S. military forces who is credited with developing the modern concept of non-lethal defense, The American Reporter has learned. [MORE]

On Native Ground
HOW KERRY CAN BEAT THE BUSH SLIME MACHINE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's one of the most important axioms of modern politics: define yourself before your opponent defines you. [MORE]

Media Beat
A MEDIA STRATEGY MEMO TO THE WHITE HOUS
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Some of the most closely guarded documents in the White House are sure to be the ones written by the president's top media strategist. [MORE]

Momentum
A REDUNDANT, ABUNDANT AMERICA
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Ah, those amber fields of grain, those purple mountains' majesty, those fruited plains! How can we not love America, even when we get so mad at her we want to scream? [MORE]

Reporting: California
EFFIE'S STORY: A TALE OF BUSH'S TIMES
by Lionel Rolfe

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- Effie - her name is actually Afthemia Patsalos - loves her three kids a lot, but there's no doubt that having two children with certifiable mental and physical disabilities can complicate your life immensely. Especially when you deal with the kind of people they wrote anti-discrimination laws for. Like, for instance, her former landlord. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE PURLOINED PURSE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Saturday, 13 March, was for us enough of a calamity to satisfy the most superstitious. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
KEEP IN TOUCH
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- We don't often hear "keep in touch" anymore; people are never out of touch. Whether you drive by, walk by, or look out the window - you're bound to see or hear someone on a cellphone. [MORE]

On Media
THE TIMES TELLS IT STRAIGHT
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, March 28, 2004 -- If the mass media are evolving into an oligarchy of corporate self-interest, somebody forgot to tell the Los Angeles Times this week, as it exposed misconduct by Ford Motor Co. and by major drug manufacturers. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
ISLAMIC PARTIES MAY BE BIG LOSERS IN INDONESIAN ELECTIONS
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, Indonesia, March 27, 2004 -- Indonesia has seen the Bali bombing, the defeat of an Islamic party in neighboring Malaysia and the rise of Islamic militancy across southeast Asia, but voters in this world's largest Muslim country are very unlikely to give much SUPPORT to Islamic parties in next week's parliamentary elections. [MORE]

On Native Ground
U.S. SLOW TO LEARN TRUTH OF SEPT. 11
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The Bush administration, the most tightly disciplined and secretive White House in memory, has worked for the last 2 1/2 years to obscure the true story of the events surrounding the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE MEDIA POLITICS OF 9/11
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO, March 25, 2004 - For 30 months, 9/11 was a huge political blessing for President George W. Bush. This week, the media halo fell off. [MORE]


SLAPPIN' TO THE OLDIES
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Whew, that was a close one. We almost lost Richard Simmons. [MORE]

Brasch Words
FDA'S EPHEDRA BAN A PROBLEM FOR MANY
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- Outside, on dry-erase boards hung on corner windows of the Dynamic Health Center on the main street of Bloomsburg, a small rural town in northeastern Pennsylvania, are two signs. On one, in scrawled letters, is the warning: "Less than 60 Days to Buy Epehedra Pre-Paid While Supplies Last." On the other, customers are advised to "Stock Up. April 12th is Last day to Buy Ephedra. Taking Pre-Paid Orders Now While Supplies Last." [MORE]

Ink Soup
BRIEFLY NOTED
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Cheney: the Mouth. The topic of this unusual and most unfair book is the mouth of the Vice President of the U.S.. The author supposes that she has the answer. Told as a teenager to "wipe that smile off your face," the ever-obedient Richy did so, forgetting that he was holding a box cutter in his hand at the time. [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
SHIFT IN GOVERNMENT MAY BE NEAR AS 500 MAOISTS ARE SLAIN IN BLOODIEST NEPAL FIGHTING YET
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, March 21, 2004 -- In the most terrible fighting in the history of the Himalayan Kingdom, Nepalese security forces gunned down over 500 Maoists rebels who have been fighting to establish a communist-style republican state for the last eight years. The fighting took place in Beni, the district headquarters of Myagdi, about 300 kilometer west of Kathmandu, the Nepalese army said here today. [MORE]

On Media
THE ARTS IN PERIL IN LOS ANGELES
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- This month, the administration of the city of Los Angeles threatened to close its own Cultural Affairs Department in order to save money, despite the fact that the entire CAD budget is less than three-tenths of 1 percent of the total. Artists, CAD bureaucrats and other sympathizers promptly raised a spirited defense and this week, the mayor capitulated. CAD is not to be demolished, at least for now. [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
AFTER U.S. ABANDONS IT, TIBETAN RESISTANCE STRUGGLES ON ALONE AGAINST CHINA
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, March 20, 2004 -- The Khampas, the staunch followers of the Tibetan spiritual leader known as the Dalai Lama, who is now living in exile in India, once fought in Nepal against the Chinese army, and are now once again heroes in Nepal. [MORE]

On Native Ground
AMERICAN VOTERS TAKE HEED: SPAIN SPEAKS TO YOU
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The March 11 terrorist bombing in Madrid and the outcome of the Spanish parliamentary elections three days later showed a fundamental difference between the American political system and that of other industrialized democracies. [MORE]

Media Beat
SPINNING THE PAST, THREATENING THE FUTURE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO - Political aphorisms don't get any more cogent: "Who controls the past controls the future; who controls the present controls the past." [MORE]

Commentary
A NEW CHALLENGE TO INDONESIA'S PRESIDENT MEGAWATI
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, Indonesia, March 17, 2004 -- When Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, a top security minister in Indonesia's cabinet, decided to tender his resignation to President Megawati Sukarnoputri last Thursday, many of his closest advisors applauded and welcomed that decision. They assumed that Susilo would soon start to fight for his own political party and to run in the 2004 presidential election in July. [MORE]

Campaign Trail
JOHN KERRY CLINCHES DEMOCRATIC NOMINATION
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., March 11, 2004 -- U.S. Senator John Forbes Kerry has clinched the Democratic Party's 2004 presidential nomination by winning a total of 2,162 delegates, the number needed for nomination, CNN reported late this morning. [MORE]

Momentum
A TOWN MEETING MEA CULPA
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I hardly recognized myself at Town Meeting this year. Time after time, I found myself voting against things that, in the ordinary course of events, I would wholeheartedly support. [MORE]

On Native Ground
KUCINICH SHOULD STAY IN THE RACE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- An AOL Website called presidentialmatch.com offers voters an interesting compatibility test. [MORE]

Ink Soup
TOP DOWN
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- After watching the Oscars, it occurs to me that we ought to have Billy Crystal emcee our national life. The material for his style of comedy is lying around asking to be used. Used, not believed. [MORE]

On Native Ground
GREENSPAN HANDS DEMOCRATS THE PERFECT ISSUE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I hope the Democrats write a thank you note to Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan in gratitude for handing the party a perfect and nearly foolproof campaign issue to bludgeon President Bush. [MORE]

Make My Day
WHY NOT A PULITZER FOR HUMOR?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- People often ask me what it's like to be a humor writer. It's very simple. So simple, in fact, that ... uhh, I mean no, it's extremely difficult. It's hard, hard work. So hard, in fact, that only extremely intelligent, highly-qualified people with special skills should attempt humor writing. [MORE]

Momentum
THE WONDERFUL WOMEN OF FILM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When I think about women in film, I first think of Charlize Theron and Nicole Kidman, tall and impossibly gorgeous blonde women in tasteful couture gowns winning Oscars for making themselves ugly. [MORE]

Campaign Trail
KERRY'S SUPER TUESDAY WAS 'TRULY SUPER'
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., March 3, 2004 -- John Kerry came of age last night. At the end of a long string of strong primary victories that made him heir to the mantle of Jefferson, Roosevelt and Kennedy as the presumptive presidential nominee of the Democratic Party, he spoke to America from the Old Post Office Pavilion in downtown Washington, surrounded by friends and fasmily and staff members focused on nine laptops that showed returns from everywhere but Vermont. [MORE]

Ink Soup
A MIXED BAG OF MAD COMPLAINTS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Herewith is Ink Soup's opinion on various burning topics of the day: The most depressing thing I've seen so far in this primary season (if you don't count the sign in a neighbor's yard backing Kucinich) is the entry of Ralph Nader, this time not as a Green but as an Independent. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A MEDITATION ON THE GIFT OF LENT
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Normally, when I write anything spiritual, I unleash some latent poetic talents and express myself privately, or perhaps in an article designed for religious publications. [MORE]

On Media
BY THEIR MAILERS WE SHALL JUDGE THEM
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- A political mailer arrived the other day, advising me on how to vote in this week's primary election. It provoked thoughts on how we elect judges - and how the mercenaries of the election industry compete with more traditional media outlets. [MORE]

American Speeches
FIGHTING A COMPREHENSIVE WAR ON TERRORISM
by Senator John F. Kerry

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 27, 2004 -- Day in and day out, George W. Bush reminds us that he is a war President and that he wants to make national security the central issue of this election. I am ready to have this debate. I welcome it. [MORE]

On Native Ground
MORE THAN NADER, DEMOCRATS SHOULD FEAR COMPLACENCY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Despite all the pleading by liberals not to, Ralph Nader is going to run for president. [MORE]

Brasch Words
FOR U.S. DEAD IN IRAQ, THERE'S NO HALF-TIME SHOW
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- On the day that Justin Timberlake ripped open Janet Jackson's blouse during the half-time of the Super Bowl to reveal a bejeweled breast and create a national firestorm of protest, American Soldiers 523 and 524 died in Iraq. Along with the two American soldiers, 14 were wounded. Also that day, two suicide bombers killed more than 100 Kurds and wounded more than 200. [MORE]

Commentary
NADER'S A MESSAGE, NOT A CAMPAIGN
by John Janney

MOBILE, Ala. -- A vote for Ralph Nader is a vote for a message, not the presidency. [MORE]

Make My Day
THE SPRINGTIME PREDICTIONS OF SCIENCE
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- It's official! The First Day of Spring will be March 10th. [MORE]

Momentum
12 REASONS NOT TO BAN GAY MARRIAGES
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There are so many things wrong with the idea of adding an anti-gay marriage amendment to the Constitution of the United States that I can barely list them all. [MORE]

Market Mover
I AM A BAD AMERICAN
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Feb. 25, 2004 -- I am a bad American for a number of reasons, but mostly because CBS newsman Bob Schieffer watches "Sex in the City" and I don't. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
MARTHA, MARTHA
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- The last time I wrote about Martha Stewart I called the article, Goody, Goody! and explored the enigma so many of us share: that of taking satisfaction at seeing the mighty fall. [MORE]

Ink Soup
IN SEATTLE, A GOOD FOOT MAN IS HARD TO FIND
ny Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.- I like Seattle, don't get me wrong. I spend a lot of my time as a correspondent telling people that they've got it all wrong about the rain - the rain is what makes life possible out here. Today there was a most unusual rain -a third-position wiper rain - nearly unheard of, and I used my umbrella for the second time this year. [MORE]

On Media
FOR NADER, NOT THE GREENS BUT THE BLUES
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- There are polls, there is wishful thinking and then there is the way people actually behave in the voting booth. The 2000 election provided some fascinating data about all three, data the pundits missed and which does not bode well for the Nader candidacy this time around. [MORE]

Make My Day
THE ADVENTURES OF LETTERMAN
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Erik has been out of the office this week, so we are reprinting an old column from 1997. [MORE]

On Native Ground
DEAN COULDN'T BEAT ENEMIES IN HIS PARTY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It was a speech he never wanted to make. [MORE]

Momentum
THE DESTRUCTION OF THE AMERICAN DREAM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- At my uncle's funeral last week, we were talking about our grandparents and great-grandparents and how they came to this country to make a better life for their children. [MORE]

Campaign 2004
DEAN QUITS RACE, BUT HIS CAMPAIGN CONTINUES
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Feb. 18, 2004 -- America can still look forward to hearing more from former Vt. Gov. Howard Dean, but it won't be as a presidential candidate - and reportedly may be as the long-sought liberal talk show host who can take on Clear Channel conservative powerhouse Rush Limbaugh. [MORE]

Campaign 2004
KERRY TAKES THE EDWARDS CHALLENGE
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Feb. 18, 2004 -- For U.S. Sen. John Kerry, a 5-point victory in Wisconsin Tuesday night marked the end of the first phase of his back-from-the-dead campaign for the presidency. It saw the demise of the populist candidacy of former Vt. Gov. Howard Dean. and the emergence of U.S. Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina as a rival - however late and unlikely - for the Democratic Party's 2004 presidential nomination in Boston in August. [MORE]

Ink Soup
CARTOONIST LIKES KERRY'S 'DRAWING POWER'
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, WA. -- When I was a schoolboy, long before I knew the word "caricature," I knew how to represent Adolf Hitler, and so did all my fellow students who could hold a pencil. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
IS 'UNHAPPY CHILDHOOD' AN OXYMORON?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Graham Greene, a prolific writer, playwright, critic, would have been 100 this year, had he lived. As one of the most widely read novelists of the 20th century it is no surprise he was a candidate for the Nobel Prize for Literature more than a few times, although he never did receive it. He wrote suspenseful tales that turned into gripping movies, but he was known as well for his flamboyant lifestyle with attendant intrigue. He named among his friends and, further, defended him against treason, master spy Kim Philby. [MORE]

Reporting: Central America
RADIO JOURNALIST'S MURDER CASE UNRAVELING
By Jay Brodell

SAN JOSE, Costa Rica, Feb. 16, 2004 —- Parmenio Medina Perez has been dead for nearly three years, but he still haunts the politicians and the prosecutors in this normally quiet Central American country better known for its beaches. [MORE]

On Native Ground
FREEDOM OF THOUGHT? NOT IN BUSH'S AMERICA
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President Bush has many character flaws, but chief among them is his inability to accept criticism of his actions. [MORE]

Make My Day
BECAUSE IT'S TIME TO GO
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- "Sweetie, do you have to go to the bathroom?" [MORE]

Momentum
A PICTURE AND A GRAVE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Kierkegaard said, "Life must be lived forwards, but can only be understood backwards," which goes a long way in explaining why I spent the month of January at the Vermont Studio Center in Johnson, Vt., where they pamper painters, sculptors and writers with private studios and carrot cake competitions, writing about my family. [MORE]

Campaign 2004
WITH STUNNING VICTORIES IN THE SOUTH, KERRY LOOKS UNBEATABLE
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Feb. 11, 2004 -- With support both broad and deep among all sectors in both states, John Kerry held a 26 percent lead in Virginia and a 16 percent lead in Tennessee last night as he added two more states to a string of caucus and primary wins that have christened him the undisputed leader of the Democratic Party's 2004 challenge to President George W. Bush. [MORE]

Ink Soup
NOTE TO A NIECE
BY Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Dear Julie: Here's the note you asked me to send for your father's birthday festivities. [MORE]

Campaign 2004
MAKE-OR-BREAK PRIMARIES FOR CLARK AND EDWARDS
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Feb. 10, 2004 -- With U.S. Sen. John Kerry far in front in the Democratic race for his party's presidential nomination, today's Virginia and Tennessee primaries could effectively end the hopes of retired Gen. Wesley Clark, an Arkansas native, and U.S. Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina, a trial lawyer who has battled Clark for second place in several states. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
IN THE GAMES OF LIFE, HE IS A PLAYER
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Arthur was a short, squat, little man about 50 always in the company of Ruth, his short, squat, little wife of roughly the same age. They were funny. Not funny looking, that was just them. They used their height and weight to their advantage by appearing six feet tall if you measure in personality. [MORE]

Brasch Words
THE PRESIDENT AS SPORT
by Walter M. Brasch

PHOENIX, Ariz. -- You can tell a lot about a person by whoever he chooses to have dinner with. [MORE]

On Native Ground
FOR BUSH, A BOGUS PROBE OF BOGUS WAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So the Bush administration is going to launch a big investigation into why the intelligence that they used to justify an invasion of Iraq turned out to be totally wrong. [MORE]

On Media
TRACKING THE TWISTED TRAIL OF URBAN MYTHS
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- Do you remember hearing about Government Bill 602P? I remember being warned about it at least twice, each time under similar circumstances. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE DEADLY LIES OF RELIABLE SOURCES
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Ninety-five days before the invasion of Iraq began, I sat in the ornate Baghdad office of the deputy prime minister as he talked about the U.N. weapons inspectors in his country. "They are doing their jobs freely, without any interruption," Tariq Aziz said. "And still the warmongering language in Washington is keeping on." [MORE]

Market Mover
STUDY SAYS U.S. FIRMS 'DUMB DOWN' MEXICAN WORKFORCE
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Feb. 4, 2004 - How would you react to evidence that the Home of the Brave, Land of the Free, allows U.S.-based tech companies to engage in the most capricious forms of employment servitude? [MORE]

Ink Soup
FOR YOUR SANITY'S SAKE, AVOID ADRIAN FEW
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Dr. Soup here. Brown is still asleep, though "still" might be an unwarranted adverb, seeing that it is only 4 o'clock in the morning. [MORE]

On Media
'INTERNET' AND 'RESEARCH' NOT ALWAYS A MATCH
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- A few years ago, science fair contestants started using a new expression. Little did I understand at the time that it was an omen of whole new things to come in national politics and of whole new ways of lying. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A WOMAN'S PREROGATIVE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- One of the earliest truths I learned is that it's a woman's prerogative to change her mind. Actually, I didn't learn it until I started going to the movies and then heard it from the madcap blondes of the day, tossing the line over their shoulders as they sashayed toward the door, passing the perplexed the maitre'd and leaving their escort behind. [MORE]

Happy 93rd Birthday, Dad!

On Native Ground
DEAN CAMPAIGN, R.I.P.: POSTMORTEM FOR A FAILED CRUSADE

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When did Howard Dean's candidacy start to die? [MORE]

Ink Soup
SLEEPLESS IN BALLARD
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I am still much too excited by the President's State of the Union Address to write coherently. Somehow, the sight of the members of two houses of Congress and the Cabinet leaping to their feet every time the leader of the free world managed to achieve closure with a sentence turns my mind into...well...ink soup. [MORE]

Campaign Trail

KERRY WINS AGAIN

by Joe Shea

ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL WITH SEN. JOHN KERRY IN MANCHESTER, N.H., Jan. 27, 2004 -- U.S. Sen. John Kerry took a second giant step Tuesday towards the Democratic presidential nomination with a solid 13-point win over former front-runner Gov. Howard Dean. Kerry got 39 percent of the vote to Dean's 26 percent. [MORE]

Campaign Trail
FIRED UP IN FREEZING NEW HAMPSHIRE, KERRY LOOKS SOUTH
by Joe Shea

WITH THE JOHN KERRY CAMPAIGN IN NEW HAMPSHIRE, Jan. 26, 2004 -- Primary Day is just hours away in New Hampshire and the race is tightening once again, with U.S. Sen. John Kerry still 11 points ahead in the latest CNN/Gallup Poll survey but a fired-up Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina charging fast toward a possible second-place finish in tomorrow's Democratic presidential primary. [MORE]

On Media
SAME SNAKE OIL, DIFFERENT BOTTLE ON QUACKWATCH.COM
by Robert Gelfand

When Gaetano Donizetti was composing L'Elisir D'Amore ("The Elixir of Love") in 1832, little did he know that the playful satire he was setting to music would find kinship in the wild claims of the nutritional supplements hucksters of the twenty-first century. [MORE]

Campaign Trail
KERRY TEAM GROWS AS PRIMARY WIN APPEARS CERTAIN
by Joe Shea

WITH THE JOHN KERRY CAMPAIGN IN MANCHESTER, N.H., Jan. 25, 2004 -- With Sen. John Kerry's reinvigorated troops still growing in number and enthusiasm, the campaign headquarters in a restored six-story red-brick mill building on the Merrimack River here is getting crowded. [MORE]

Make My Day
LOOK, UP IN THE SKY! IT'S SUPER ERIK!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. - Kids have great imaginations. They fight pirates, fly through outer space, and travel the ocean floor in their own submarine, all from the safety of their own bed. [MORE]

Campaign Trail
KERRY CAMPAIGN BUOYED BY IOWA WIN
by Joe Shea

WITH THE JOHN KERRY CAMPAIGN IN MANCHESTER, N.H., Jan. 23, 2004 -- Fresh from the 65-degree weather on Florida's Gulf Coast, you'd think the biting cold here in The Granite State would have been the most compelling issue for me in my first day as a volunteer with the John Kerry for President campaign. It wasn't. [MORE]

On Native Ground
LOOKING BACK AT IOWA, LOOKING AHEAD AT NEW HAMPSHIRE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Is it all over for Howard Dean? [MORE]

Ink Soup
MEMO TO THE DYING: NEATNESS COUNTS. AND COUNTS.
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- My days in retirement flow past in a kind of tranquil routine: Mondays, I wash my bed linen; Tuesdays I send Joe Shea something for the American Reporter; Wednesday...well, today I send the column that you read a few days later...but this is not the usual Wednesday. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE WHEELS HAVE COME OFF THE BUSH WAR WAGON
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If there is anyone out there who still believes any of the Bush administration's rationales for a U.S. invasion of Iraq, they are either hopelessly stupid or working for President Bush. [MORE]

On Media
IF IT BLEEDS, LET IT LEAD
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 19, 2004 -- Media critics are generally contemptuous of the tv news maxim, "if it bleeds, it leads," which refers to the tendency in local news broadcasts to begin with the goriest stories of the day. [MORE]

Campaign 2004
KERRY SURGES TO TOP SPOT IN LATEST ZOGBY POLL
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Jan. 15, 2004 -- In a dramatic turnaround, U.S. Sen. John F. Kerry has surged to the top of the latest Zogby tracking poll of 501 likely caucus-goers in Iowa, Fox News reported Thursday morning, and has led rival Howard Dean by as much as 7 percent in recent overnight polls. [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT DOES $%&*! MEAN?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- "This is really, really f---ing brilliant!" [MORE]

On Media
MOVEON'S BIG MOVE: THE INTERNET COMES OF AGE
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The Republican Party complaining about tasteless campaigning is like Jerry Springer complaining about the decline of manners in modern society. The story would be hilarious but for the fact that millions of people were seriously misled last week as the Republicans and the rest of the right-wing propaganda machine went to work on the organization known as MoveOn. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
McSORLEY'S STILL THRIVES, WOMEN AND ALL
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- As an Irishwoman who's been to McSorley's, I was drawn to the oil on canvas at the Phoenix Art Museum - artist John Sloan's original work, painted decades before we ourselvles stopped in for a glass of ale sometime in the late Sixties. [MORE]

Commentary
WHY JOHN KERRY WILL WIN
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Jan. 11, 2004 -- Sen. John Kerry has a steep uphill grade ahead of him on the trail to the White House. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WILL BUSH BRING BACK THE DRAFT?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The neo-con brainiacs who gave us the ongoing quagmire in Iraq have more big plans for President George W. Bush. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
ARNOLD'S NEXT MOVE: DETENTE WITH THE DEMOCRATS
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- Democratic legislators sat with blank faces on Jan. 6, many not applauding even once at Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's State of the State speech, illustrating both the partisan world of Sacramento and also the delicate psychological handling these shell-shocked politicians will require. [MORE]

Make My Day
TODAY IS OPPOSITE DAY, NYAH NYAH NYAH!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Every kid has their favorite day of the year. And being greedy little capitalists, they're usually Christmas and birthdays. Kids also have their least favorite days, like the days after Christmas and their birthdays. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
THE INTERMINABLE TERMINAL: OFF THE ROAD AGAIN
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Whether you rush around preparing for the holidays or a holiday, there are always things left undone that nag you while you're away. What if something happens and you don't make it home and people have to come into the house and see my unmade bed. What if? Really, what if? [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE RIGHT'S NEWEST DEAN SMEAR TACTIC: HE'S CRAZY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The right-wing screech monkeys (or RWSMs, for short) seem to have a new strategy for dealing with Howard Dean. [MORE]

On Media
MICHAEL FUMENTO AND MYTH-BUSTING
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- Michael Fumento is a crusading reporter who thinks the media have been way too easy on the Atkins diet, Erin Brockovich and the Gulf War Syndrome. Fumento is a one-time paratrooper turned attorney turned science journalist who has managed to irritate a hefty fraction of Left wing activists and a pretty good fraction of the Right wing to boot. What's not to like? [MORE]

Jill Stewart
ARNOLD AS THINKER: WILL RODIN COME TO SACRAMENTO?
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Jan. 4, 2003 -- Well, hellooo carrot and stick. Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger just displayed dramatic examples of both in his dealings with the California legislature, which is still reeling from it and is scrambling in private to figure out how to deal with it. [MORE]

Momentum
2003: THE YEAR OF PROTESTING CREATIVELY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In 2003, so much went wrong so quickly that protesting became almost a full-time job. The good news is that many did it with style. [MORE]

Make My Day
WORDS TO BANISH IN 2004
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Having a good command of language is important if you want to be a writer. Painters use paint, musicians use music, woodworkers use wood, writers use ... well, words, but you get the idea. Words and language are essential tools for a writer's craft. So knowing how to have words good is important to be a gooder writer for making stories and stuff. [MORE]

Happy New Year!
The American Reporter Celebrates
Our 10th Anniversary Year
1995 - 2004

An A.R. Special Report
A YEAR SPILLING OVER WITH COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES

by Andy Oram

CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Dec. 31, 2003 -- Editor's Note: American Reporter Webmaster Andy Oram, an editor at O'Reilly & Associates, writes each year on the promise and peril of the Internet. Here are his reflections on developments in 2003, and their significance for the years ahead. For members of our information-rich stratum in Western society, it used to be the wealth of data - that is, the results of communication - that we drowned in. But 2003 took technology to another level. It threatened to drown us in a wealth of communications channels themselves! Voice over IP, Wi-Fi access points, satellite radio, 3G cell phones - when will the cornucopia trickle to a stop? [MORE]

Ink SoupFREE AT LAST
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- It's not that I'm ignoring the holidays. Far from it. If it were not for the proximity of Christmas, the prospect of being cooped up as a juror during a long trial with 11 other peers of the accused would not have terrified me so. [MORE]

On Media
FRONT PAGE MAGAZINE: THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE MEDIA
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Front Page Magazine is the creation of David Horowitz, a one-time hard-Left activist who converted to the conservative cause and is now one of its chief spokesmen. FrontPageMag.com is simultaneously Horowitz' revenge on his former comrades, a sometimes overly shrill attack on all things liberal, and generally a pretty good read. [MORE]

Monday Moron
HOLIDAY GIFTS TO GAG ON
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA -- Well, I certainly hope that your holiday was full of hope, joy and love. In an effort to share my sense of well-being with all of today's most visible characters, I engaged in my usual holiday routine of sending gifts to those who have helped me take this column to the depths of borderline insanity. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WHAT WE MUST FIGHT FOR IN 2004
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - It's not an exaggeration to say that it is imperative that President George W. Bush is evicted from the White House in 2004. [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT IF I QUADRUPLED IT?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- As we begin our new year, I have several resolutions, including becoming a millionaire. I realize it's largely unachievable, but I feel better if I fail at something other than the "eat right, exercise more" resolution everyone else blows. [MORE]

Market Mover
WHEN DO THE BANK SCANDALS START?
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Dec. 23, 2004 -- The Comptroller of the Currency of the United States and the U.S. Treasury Department have my permission to give a big holiday gift to all Americans: a thorough investigation of the banks which have become stockbrokers and insurance agents. [MORE]

Ink Soup
A SOUP OF ONE'S PEERS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- By the time you read this, I could be sequestered with my fellow jurors in some seedy Seattle hostelry, forbidden by court order to talk to journalists, to fellow jurors, or even to my colleague Dr. Soup. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
CALL IT THE 'PK' SYNDROME
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Preacher's kids - need I say more? It's an almost stereotypical reference to someone assumed to be squeaky clean, who should be held up as a shining example, but who is really running with the pack. [MORE]

Breaking News
2 DIE AS STRONG QUAKE SHAKES CENTRAL CALIFORNIA
From News Services

DEC. 21, 2003, 2:45pm (EST) -- A stong earthquake with a magnitude of 6.5 and centered near historic Hearst Castle in San Simeon, Calif., struck the Central California coast late this morning, leaving two women dead in the mountain community of Paso Robles and millions of Californians shaken along a 350-mile stretch of coastline from San Francisco to downtown Los Angeles. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
SUHARTO PARTY IN COMEBACK MODE AS ELECTIONS NEAR
ny Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA -- Recent opinion polls showed that President Megawati Sukarnoputri's party, currently the largest in the Indonesia parliament, may lose some support in the general election next April. But as daughter of the country's founding president, she is still seen as the favorite in the presidential race three months later. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
ARNOLD PULLS OFF A SACRAMENTO HAT TRICK
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- When both sides in Sacramento are grumbling after a key vote, you know for certain that the rare bird known as compromise has flown and perched on the Capitol dome. That's heartening to see after a year of partisan gridlock that got California exactly nowhere. [MORE]

Momentum
A LEADER TO LEAD US ALL
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- This is what I want for Christmas: a country united, and a leader who leads us all. That's all. [MORE]

The American Reporter
Hails and Salutes

100 Years of Flight
1903 - 2003

Opinion
IS IT TIME TO OVERRULE THE SUPREME COURT?

by Jeff Milchen

BOZEMAN, Mont. -- I'm two states removed from California, and I don't know who I'd have supported in San Francisco's recent runoff election for mayor. But I do know this: democracy lost. [MORE]

Breaking News
POWELL HAS SURGERY FOR PROSTATE CANCER
by Joe Shea

WASHINGTON, Dec. 15, 2003, 9:50am -- U.S. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, the symbol of his country's diplomacy as well as the diversity of its leadership, will undergo surgery for prostate cancer at Walter Reed Army Meeical Center in Washington today, MSNBC reported. [MORE]

SADDAM CAPTURED NEAR TIKRIT; IRAQIS JUBILANT
by Joe Shea

FROM NEWS SERVICES, Dec. 14, 2003 -- Saddam Hussein, the feared and despotic ruler of Iraq for more than two decades, was captured alive at a rural farmhouse by the U.S. Army's 4th Infantry Division Wolverine Combat Team No. 1, a unit of the United States Army's Task Force Iron Horse, near his birthplace of Tikrit at about 8 p.m. Baghdad time Saturday night, the head of the Iraq Authority said Sunday morning. [MORE]

Analysis
SADDAM'S GONE, BUT IRAQ IS STILL A QUAGMIRE
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The capture of former Iraqi president Saddam Hussein on Sunday was a great coup for the United States. [MORE]

On Media
POLITICAL REFORM AND THE INTERNET MEDIA
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- In a republic that prides itself on a free press as the defender of democracy, it is remarkable how little the press is willing to expose and oppose candidates who lie, distort, and otherwise sling mud in the end stage of campaigning. Attacks may come in the form of television spots or political mailers timed to arrive in the final hours before an election. In each case, the advantage goes to the candidate who has the money to carry out the attack. [MORE]

Monday Moron
DATELINE: MORON
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- Piecing together a humor-based column is difficult today given the gravity of world news we have received in the past 24 hours. [MORE]

Market Mover
AT THE MULTI-CENTER MALL OF PANAMA, IT'S CHRISTMAS-MANIA
by Mark Scheinbaum

PANAMA CITY, Panama, Dec. 13, 2003 - Both the temperature and humidity are around 85 and in full red dress uniform - hat, boots, beard, gloves - Santa Claus was waving at traffic on Avenida Balboa, and well, to be honest, as shoppers walked by they whiffed the fact that St. Nick was getting, shall we say, a little ripe. [MORE]

On Native Ground
LET 'EM EAT PEPPER SPRAY: THE 'MIAMI MODEL' FOR PROTESTERS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Comedian and political activist Barry Crimmins thinks next year will be "the summer of hate" - the moment when the opposition to everything that the Bush administration stands for will reach a boiling point. [MORE]

Media Beat
PROGRESS AND PERIL FOR U.S. GREENS
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Up against the campaign of a wealthy businessman who outspent him nearly 10-to-1, a strong progressive candidate nearly won the runoff election last Tuesday to become this city's mayor. Some national news stories depicted the strong showing for Matt Gonzalez as a big surprise. But it shouldn't perplex anyone when vigorous grassroots organizing combines with a sound strategy to get breakthrough results. [MORE]

Make My Day
I DO?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- My wife and I raised a lot of eyebrows when we first announced our engagement. I think it was especially puzzling to people, because we had already been married for three years when we made the announcement. [MORE]

Momentum
A LEFT-WING VS. A RIGHT-WING DEATH
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It seems as if no one comes fresh to new experiences these days; we're all carrying too much baggage in our minds. [MORE]

Brasch Words
WHEN HONEST REPORTING GIVES WAY TO GLITZ
by Walter Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- The relationship between the tv networks and nation's publicists is incestuous. Most guests on the morning news shows and the late evening talk shows are actors and musicians plugging their latest releases. Some of the guests, however, are writers and editors for mass-market magazines. In one dramatic example of how the news and entertainment are becoming one, NBC's "Today Show" broadcasts stories that first appeared in People magazine. [MORE]

On Media
HARSH TONE OF POLITICAL ADS HURTS DEMOCRACY
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Watching the mass media cover political advertising is like watching one of those teen horror movies. Why don't the kids come out of the basement and escape from the deranged killer? Why don't newspapers do the most obvious things to protect democracy? [MORE]

Ink Soup
SUNT LACRIMAE RERUM
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- When I was growing up in the Thirties in South Carolina I absorbed, along with the rest of the local culture, the rule that forbade men to cry. John 11:35-"Jesus wept"-to the contrary notwithstanding, men, real men, did not weep. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
BESIDE MYSELF
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- As the youngest of nine children, I was always so proud to sit at that table literally surrounded by brothers and sisters. One by one over the years, there became fewer of us still standing. We've lessened our number but still increased the size of the family with the boys and girls of our next generation. [MORE]

Commentary: Campaign 2004
KERRY STARS IN FACE-OFF WITH FLORIDA DEMOCRATS
by Joe Shea

ORLANDO, Dec. 7, 2003 -- Five minutes into a tough-talking stem-winder that had Florida's Democrats at their state convention here wildly cheering and waving their signs, U.S. Sen. John F. Kerry was suddenly recapturing the coveted mantle of leadership from hard-charging former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean. [MORE]

On Native Ground
TO REPUBLICANS, CRITICIZING BUSH IS 'HATE SPEECH'
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Republican National Committee chairman Ed Gillespie was in Vermont a few days ago to do some fundraising and spread his party's message for the 2004 campaign - to criticize President Bush is to be guilty of committing "political hate speech." [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
POOH'S GOT A NEW PAL IN DISNEY FEUD: JOHNNY COCHRAN
by Joe Shea

ORLANDO, Fla., Dec. 6, 2001 -- The man who freed O.J. Simpson from the clutches of the law in his celebrated murder case will soon go nose-to-nose with the only man who ever prosecuted Simpson successfully - in civil court - for the murders of his wife Nicole and waiter Ron Goldman - in the mutlibillion-dollar suit over royalties and future rights to Winnie the Pooh. [MORE]

Media Beat
PHEW-EE!
PEW POLL ON 'TRADE' DOESN'T PASS SNIFF TEST
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Drawing on poll numbers gathered last year, the influential Pew Research Center for the People and the Press waited until the recent trade summit in Miami to put out a report under headlines that proclaimed "Support for Free Trade" and "Miami Protests Do Not Reflect Popular Views." But a much more fitting headline would have been: "Report Conclusions Do Not Reflect Actual Data." [MORE]

Make My Day
YOU
YOU THINK IT'S FUNNY, BUT IT'S NOT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Ask any parent about the worst part of parenting, and they'll all tell you the same thing: "I hate it when my kids get sick." The cries of "I don't fe-e-e-e-e-l go-o-o-o-o-d!" are always met with a heavy sigh, closed eyes, and a brief, but fervent prayer for strength and patience. Mostly patience. [MORE]

Momentum
BLAMING MICHAEL JACKSON ON BEETHOVEN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I may be one of the few people in the United States today who thinks Michael Jackson is innocent of child abuse. [MORE]

On Media
RADICAL RADIO AND ITS REBELLIOUS LISTENERS
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- The Pacifica Foundation runs five radio stations that are on the leading edge of dissent in the United States. Strategically located in Berkeley, New York, Los Angeles, Washington, D.C. and Houston, the Pacifica stations like to think of themselves as free speech radio. By this they mean radio that allows for the expression of ideas that are not broadcast, much less discussed seriously, on mainstream radio or television. [MORE]

The Right Side
THE FALL OF A GREAT NEWSPAPER
by Steven Travers

SAN FRANCISCO -- The Los Angeles Times was one of the finest newspapers in the world; the voice of the New West, a land of electoral votes, emerging trends and Pacific Rim power. In the Jim Murray era, they presided over the "sports capitol of the world." During Watergate, the Times maintained balance and in-depth coverage while its Eastern counterparts became spigots of anti-Nixon vitriol. However, in stages over many years, their integrity became another casualty of liberal media bias. [MORE]

Monday Moron
SCROOGED AGAIN
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA -- This week, on a very special episode of "Blossom" - check that, "Monday Moron" - I broach the subject of the existence of ghosts and all they represent. As we all enjoy Thanksgiving and the kick-off of the 2003 holiday season, we are reminded of things past, present and future. [MORE]

On Native Ground
DEAN ISN'T THE POLITICIAN WE THINK
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We still find it hard to believe, here in Vermont, that our former governor, Howard Dean, is the current front-runner for the Democratic Party's presidential nomination. [MORE]

Happy Thanksgiving, Everyone!

PRESIDENT'S SURPRISE VISIT TO IRAQ DELIGHTS U.S. TROOPS
by Joe Shea

THANKSGIVING DAY -- Renewing a tradition as old as Valley Forge, the nation's Commander-in-Chief went to dinner with his soldiers at the battlefront today to celebrate the most American of holidays, the traditional feast of Thanksgiving. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SOUP REDIVIVUS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE. Wash. -- Dr. Soup walked, no, make that lurched into the office the other day and started talking to us all as if he'd been here for the last few months every day. [MORE]

An A.R. Editorial
ON TO IRAN
by Joe Shea

BARDENTON, Fla., Nov. 20, 2003 -- With the revelation just minutes ago that Osama bin Laden is in Iran with his top aide and planning terrorist actions there, a critical hour in the War on Terrorism has arrived. [MORE]

In Grateful Memory
John Fitzgerald Kennedy
May 29, 1917 - November 22, 1963
35th President of the United States

On Native Ground
40 YEARS LATER, HIS PROMISE STILL HAUNTS US

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - It's hard to keep from doing it. [MORE]

Momentum
IT'S THE PARADIGM, STUPID
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I heard on the radio that presidential candidate Joe Lieberman is running ads in New Hampshire attacking Howard Dean for his Confederate flag comment and for not accepting federal campaign financing. [MORE]


TO FLORIDA, FREE TRADE COULD MEAN A CONCRETE JUNGLE
by Mark Scheinbaum

MIAMI -- A successful Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) could bring an end to Florida as we know it. [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
THE WOMAN BEHIND AN OIL GIANT'S FALL
by Lucy Komisar

PARIS -- A French woman of Russian origin, armed with thousands of papers related to the Yukos oil scandal, the giant Menatep business group and its offshore banking and securities dealings over the past decade, has been providing information to Russian prosecutors, the American Reporter has learned. [MORE]

Homuiny & Hash
THE TEFLON-COATED SLIPPERY SLOPE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- We now know going from the frying pan into the fire is a viable threat - assuming your frying pan is Teflon coated. Last week news camw that the presence of a complex polymer in Teflon that can be absorbed into our systems through food prepared in Teflon coated pots, pans, and baking tins. [MORE]

On Media
THE MOST ALTERNATE OF THE ALTERNATE MEDIA
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- There's night and day, there's yin and yang and there's commercial radio - and then there's Pacifica. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE WAL-MARTIZATION OF THE AMERICAN ECONOMY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Americans love a bargain. That's why Wal-Mart has been so successful. [MORE]

Media Beat
IN MEDIA WARS OF BRAZIL, A DISTANT MIRROR
by Norman Solomon

RIO DE JANEIRO - After a quarter-century of intensive grassroots organizing and a victorious presidential campaign a year ago, Brazilian social movements are in a strong position as they push the Left-wing Workers Party government to fulfill its promises. The contrast to Washington's current political climate is as diametrical as the opposite seasons of the two countries. Yet Brazilian activists are now giving heightened priority to the same concern that preoccupies an increasing number of people in the United States - the imperative of challenging the corporate media. [MORE]

Momentum
WHAT'S UP WITH YOUR FOOD, AMERICA?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Last year 12 million Americans were worried that they couldn't put food on the table, while another 58 million were classified as obese. It's hard not to wonder about America's dysfunctional relationship with its dinner. [MORE]

Reporting: Costa Rica
RATE SCAM SHATTERS COSTA RICAN IDYLL FOR MANY
By James J. Brodell

SAN JOSE, Costa Rica -- For years, a North American could get a 3 percent monthly return on dollars here. That's $3,000 a month on a $100,000 investment. [MORE]

American Speeches
WAR, SOCIAL JUSTICE, MEDIA AND DEMOCRACY
by Norman Solomon

BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil -- Editor's Note: This is the prepared text of a speech by American Reporter Correspondent Norman Solomon delivered to the Brazilian Social Forum in Belo Horizonte, Brazil on Nov. 8, 2003. I am very glad to be here to participate in the Brazilian Social Forum. [MORE]

On Media
THE (ALMOST) LAST WORD ON THE CALIFORNIA RECALL ELECTION
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- The waning hours of the recent California recall campaign included dueling dirty tricks presented to the media by both sides. The media did not come off unsullied. [MORE]

Opinion
by Doug Lasken

LOS ANGELES - Many Americans have been intrigued by the call in the Declaration of Independence for revolution under certain circumstances. It's a stateument we ought to consider on this Veterans Day, when we honor all those who died for the freedoms it promised. Here is the passage: [MORE]

On Native Ground
BUSH ECONOMICS: GROWTH WITHOUT NEW JOBS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The 2004 election is less than a year away, and President Bush would like you to believe that the U.S. economy is on the rebound. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE STEADY THEFT OF OUR TIME
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO - One of the worst things about today's ultramodern systems of communication is hiding in plain sight: They waste our time. [MORE]

Momentum
EULOGY FOR A LOVELY CAT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- For more than five years, this was my small family: a happy husband, a happy wife, and a happy little black, white and orange cat. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SWEAT EQUITY
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wa.-Back in Princeton I used to have colleagues, people whom I saw every day in the hallways and seminar rooms and lecture halls. I still, in some sense, have them, though it is my great misfortune never to see them in the flesh-only in the feeble traces that they leave on the email screen. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
EVERYBODY'S TRYING TO GET INTO THE ACT*
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This was the first year we did not spend anything on candy for the adorable trick-or-treating goblins coming to our front door, nothing for the neighborhood children collecting loot to be dispersed by caring parents for at least the next three months. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE UNGRATEFUL PRESIDENT
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Now, after all the national media have done for President George W. Bush, the guy's complaining. "There's a sense that people in America aren't getting the truth," he says. [MORE]

On Media
THE LESSON OF THE FIRES
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- For the past week I have been watching television news coverage of the California brushfires. Not once did I see or hear mention of the one central fact about these fires that is critical to how we ought to understand and respond to them. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WHEN JOURNALISTS TRADE TRUTH FOR ACCESS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Before there was Jayson Blair, there was Walter Duranty. [MORE]

Make My Day
JUST IMAGINE THEM NAKED
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- What is it about public speaking that scares the bejeezus out of some people? [MORE]

Momentum
THE WORLD WAS FUN WHILE IT LASTED
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If Darwin was right, then America is doomed. [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
MURDER, VIOLENCE AND CONSPIRACY CRUSH PRESS FREEDOMS IN NEPAL
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, Oct. 26, 2003 -- Gyanendra Khadka, a journalist working for the National News Agency of Nepal, had his throat slashed by a group of Maoists. As his wife begged for the life of her husband, the rebels slashed his throat on a Buddhist altar. [MORE]

Ink Soup
PERFECT? OR WHAT?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Not often, but often enough, I am glad to have endured the ordeal of being the only major in Classical Greek at Duke. It comes in handy not only when I am trying to explain a word like "bibliophobe" to a grandchild, but also when I am trying to explain to myself what exactly it is that I believe, or do not believe. [MORE]


STARTING OVER WHEN THERE'S NO LOOKING BACK
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Lynne and Ed had just moved their family, dog and all, from Indiana to California. They were not fully unpacked when flames engulfed their new home, all escaping, the screaming children, the barking dog, just as they were - eyebrows singed from their last ditch effort to grab a box or two, not knowing if they contained pots and pans or precious memories. [MORE]

Monday Moron
MANUTE GOES BOL-ING FOR DOLLARS
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- He stands 7'7" in height, weighs about 225 pounds (the equivalent of roughly, oh, nothing for a person that tall) and hails from Sudan. He came to the United States many years ago to become, shockingly, a basketball player. After a few years at Villanova University, he went on to the National Basketball Association and launched his pursuit of the American dream with a lucrative contract and numerous endorsement deals. [MORE]

On Native Ground
AT THE NATIONAL REVIEW, VERMONT IS HELL
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What exactly is it about Vermont that moves conservatives to sputtering rage? [MORE]

Baseball
A MARLINS' TALE: FROM WORST TO FIRST
by Mark Scheinbaum

MIAMI, Oct. 27, 2003 --The Florida Marlins: from worst to first in one year. [MORE]

Travel Notes
KENSINGTON: STAYING IN LONDON LIKE A NATIVE
by Lucy Komisar

LONDON -- Where would you want to live if you lived London? What neighborhood has elegance, charm, sophistication and also sense that it's for real residents, not for tourists, nor for moguls or diplomats or businessmen on expense accounts? Where do you get a sense of community, but also a location near some of the museums, royal landmarks and parks that London is famous for? [MORE]

Opinion
IT'S TIME TO STOP H.O.A. FORECLOSURES
by Harvella Jones

HOUSTON - Frustrated by laws that allow Texas homeowner's associations to foreclose on member's homes and condos for trivial violations of rules, the Texas Homeowner's Advocate Group is circulating a national petition to permanently stop them everywhere in the country. [MORE]

Momentum
COST IS NOT THE ONLY HEALTH CARE PROBLEM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We spend so much time talking about the high cost of health care that we lose sight of the system's other problems. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A LATER DUSK, AN EARLIER DAWN
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Daylight Saving Time has never meant more to me than springing ahead an hour in the Spring and falling back an hour in the Fall. It's so simple. "They" say do it April 6 and do it again October 26, differing by a day or two every year. No problem. [MORE]

Ink Soup
COOL POEMS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- Let me first, as the Brits say, declare my interest. The author of this book was a student of mine (Princeton, '98), and what is more, I read "The Book of Motion" first as his Senior Thesis in the Department of Comparative Literature. [MORE]

Outrageous Opinion
AHNOLD AND THE NEW REICH
by Lionel Rolfe

LOS ANGELES -- Ahnold is the kind of guy who forces you to think about politics. And I have to admit, I'm dealing with a prejudice. It's never failed for me - scratch an Austrian and you invariably find a Nazi. [MORE]

On Native Ground
BUSH ADMINISTRATION, SELLING A QUAGMIRE, FINDS FEW BUYERS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - If the ongoing U.S. occupation of Iraq has been such a success, why does the Bush administration need to manufacture good news about it? [MORE]

Momentum
AMERICA'S DEATH WISH
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So, let's see what's on television tonight? How many murders? How many rapes? How many autopsies will I see? [MORE]

Media Beat
BRAND LOYALTY AND THE ABSENCE OF REMORSE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Midway through this month, a Wall Street Journal headline captured the flimflam spirit that infuses so much of what passes for mass communications these days: "Despite Slump, Students Flock to Ad Schools." Many young people can recognize a growth industry, and the business of large-scale deception is booming. [MORE]

Market Mover
THE $87-BILLION-DOLLAR MISUNDERSTANDING by Mark Scheinbaum
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Oct. 17, 2003 -- The Bush administration's call for $87 billion in initial additional funding to get Iraq up and running as an OPEC-rich economy has me puzzled. [MORE]


THE DECKERS FAMILY, INC.
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- To: All members of Deckers Family, Inc. From: President Daddy. RE: Yearly Evaluation Report, etc.[MORE]

Dear Employees of DFI:

American League Playoffs
YANKS DO IT AGAIN!
by Joe Shea

NEW YORK, Oct. 17, 2003 -- The hopes of a battered city rose up after midnight this morning with a towering home run blasted into the bleachers by soft-spoken hero Aaron Boone, capping a miraculous comeback that saw the New York Yankees sprint from behind late in the game against relentless right-hander Pedro Martinez and capture the American League pennant from the Boston Red Sox 8-5 in the 11th inning. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
HOW I LEARNED TO LOVE THE GAME
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Well, now, that's a title never, ever, to appear over something I write. I know, never say never, but too many years have been invested being left out to begin joining in now. [MORE]

Ink Soup

CUSTOM-MADE POSTCARDS FROM THE ILL AT EASE

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--I am subject, increasingly it seems, to tiny waking hallucinations or dreams or fantasies...whatever...to which I have given the shorthand name PFH, which stands for Postcards from Hell. Let me acknowledge en passant my indebtedness to Wallace Stevens' "A Postcard from the Volcano." [MORE]

On Media
THE MUSICAL CONNECTION
by Robert Gelfand

SACILE, Italy -- What is the connection between Bob Mitchell's 91st birthday, the silent film festival now in full swing in Sacile, Italy, and the current state of American politics? There is a common theme running through all of these and it goes right to the emotional heart of things. [MORE]

Monday Moron
WE DON'T NEED NO STINKING TREES
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- His name is Adam Roberts and he is an environmental wacko (on Rush Limbaugh's word alone, but probably for good reason). Perched (pun intended) atop his bully pulpit as a senior research associate at the Animal Welfare Institute, he recently took issue with the Bush administration's proposed changes to long-standing conservation policies concerning endangered species existing within indigent nations. [MORE]


PSSST! GOV. JEB? WHICH COMES FIRST, BIOTECH OR EDUCATION?
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Oct. 19, 2003 -- Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, has kicked off his 2008 presidential campaign with a call for the Legislature to spend $310 million to attract a new branch of California's Scripps Research Institute, and potentially 6,500 jobs. [MORE]

Make My Day
THE PARENTS' CURSE
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- One of the greatest things about being a kid was the overwhelming sense of invulnerability. I was charmed. I was lucky. I was invincible. Nothing could happen to me, because I was Erik Deckers, Super Kid! And nothing bad ever happened to kids. [MORE]

Momentum
PAYING FOR IRAQ
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It is costing the United States approximately $4 billion every month to occupy Iraq. [MORE]

Ink Soup
A SPOOL OF INK
Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.-- For the first time in a year at least I've been making a few notes on the little pocket recorder. [MORE]

Reporting: California Recall
IT'S GOV. ARNOLD; DAVIS 'TERMINATED' BY WIDE MARGIN
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 7, 2003 -- California voters turned out in record numbers Tuesday to oust Gov. Gray Davis by a margin of about 8 percentage points and elect Arnold Schwarzenegger as his replacement in the first successful recall of a sitting American governor since 1908. Network exit polls and late returns showed recall succeeding by about 54 to 46 percent, and with 97.1 percent of precincts reporting Schwarzenegger was getting about 50,000 more votes than Davis got against the recall, thus winning this strategic but unusual version of the popular vote. [MORE]

An A.R. Editorial
VOTE 'NO' ON CALIFORNIA RECALL
by Joe Shea

Voters and elected officials in California owe a debt of gratitude to Rep. Darrell Issa, the former car thief and failed gubernatorial candidate whose multimillion-dollar alarm business helped him fund the California recall election that will be decided tomorrow. [MORE]

On Media
A LUCKY WEEK FOR LIMBAUGH?
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- It was a lucky week for Rush Limbaugh, what with the media spotlight being on Arnold Schwarzenegger. This seems to have relieved Limbaugh, at least so far, from experiencing a media firestorm that he richly deserves. Since Sept. 28, Limbaugh has been roundly criticized for remarks he made about a black football player, was forced to resign from his position as football commentator on ESPN, and in a separate inquiry is being accused of being a big-time drug abuser. It's getting a little hard to keep track. [MORE]

May Peace Be Upon Your House
Happy High Holy Days

On Native Ground
LIES AND ERRORS, NOT SPYGATE, ARE THE REAL BUSH SCANDAL

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I hate to sound like a Republican, but I do think the current feeding frenzy over the outing of a CIA operative by the Bush administration is overblown. [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT'S WRONG WITH HALL & OATES?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I've come to the conclusion that it doesn't matter how old you are: Your parents thought your music was crap and your kids will think it's boring. It's true for anyone. We hate our kids' music, our parents hated our music, and their parents hated their music. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
CALIFORNIA'S TECTONIC PLATES - POLITICAL ONES, ARE SHIFTING
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Oct. 2, 2003 -- The only things that can be predicted at this point in the frantic final days of the race to recall Gov. Gray Davis are that panic reigns inside the camps that are losing, fur will now fly with gobs of flesh attached, and the losers won't just be the three men who voters reject as governor. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
HOW DAVIS LOST CALIFORNIA
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Oct. 1, 2003 -- Numbers really do lie, and people using numbers lie even more. That's one of the more profound if overlooked lessons of the movement to recall Gray Davis that is hurtling toward Oct. 7. [MORE]

Momentum
ACID RAINDROPS KEEP FALLING ON MY HEAD
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We live in a house that has its own well and septic system, so before we bought it, we had the water tested. Therefore, I can tell you for an actual fact that on Feb. 1, 1994, the pH content of my well was 6.5, which was acceptable, but low. [MORE]

Media Beat
UNMASKING THE 'UGLY ANTI-AMERICAN'
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Strong critics of U.S. foreign policy often encounter charges of "anti-Americanism." Even though vast numbers of people in the United States disagree with Washington's assumptions and military actions, some pundits can't resist grabbing onto a timeworn handle of pseudo-patriotic demagoguery. [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
CONTAMINATED CHINESE HONEY PUTS SARA LEE AND SMUCKERS IN STICKY SITUATION
by DeWayne Lumpkin

GRANTS PASS, Ore., Sept. 29, 2003 -- Two of America's best-known brands, Sara Lee and J.M. Smuckers, have found themselves embroiled in a sticky situation involving Chinese honey smuggling that has roiled the global honey industry and led to investigations and recalls. Two federal agencies and both companies acknowledge they have a problem with companies that disguise the origin of Chinese honey contaminated with a powerful antibiotic that in some cases can cause anemia, The American Reporter has learned. [MORE]

Ink Soup
YOUR HEAD HERE
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--When King Edward VIII finally decided that he would abdicate, that he would rather be married to the divorced American woman than enthroned in single blessedness, and that Duke of Windsor was not such a bad title after all, the Times of London did not announce this to its readers with this headline: King to Cabinet: I'm Outta Here. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
REMEMBER THAT KID'S GAME, 'RED LIGHT, GREEN LIGHT?'
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When we see a red light, we darn well better stop or pay the consequences: either a smashed fender or a stiff fine. Either way, we stop. Now, about these telemarketers. Fifty million American families signed up for the "Do Not Call" program, prohibiting sales persons from calling our homes to pitch their wares or programs or services. [MORE]

On Native Ground
AM I AN ANGRY LEFTY? YES, AND I'VE GOT LOTS OF COMPANY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The new buzz phrase in the news media these days is "the Angry Left." [MORE]

Passings: George Plimpton
WHAT IS A GENTLEMAN?
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- I was neither to the manner nor the manor born, but knew someone who was: George Plimpton, a friend and gentleman, who died yesterday at the age of 76. [MORE]

Make My Day
BUT I NEED FIVE HAMMERS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- One of the great things about being a home owner is that there is always something that needs to be repaired or remodeled. And while most home owners will agree that I've probably been hit in the head with a hammer too many times, any tool-loving Guy knows exactly what I'm talking about. [MORE]

California Recall
RECALL FREE-FOR-ALL DISTINGUISHES CAMEJO
by Joe shea

BRADENTON, Fla. -- Here's my take on the debate watched by millions of Californians and even more other Americans tonight: It was a disaster for Gray Davis (who should have been included in it), a wash for Republicans Sen. Tom McClintock and Arnold Schwarzenegger, a total loss for independent Ariana Huffington and Democratic Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante, and a strong victory for Green Party candidate Peter Camejo. Disclosure: I left California for Florida in June. [MORE]

Momentum
WHY I LOVE STEPHANIE PLUM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Ordinarily, I would be ashamed to admit I'm a fan of Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum detective series. After all, I'm a serious person. I read The New York Times, The New Yorker and Harper's. I write about politics and world events. [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
DID VENEZUELA SHOOT DOWN U.S. SPY PLANE?
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Sept. 23, 2003 -- An American OV-10 spy plane that was reportedly shot down Sunday over northeast Colombia, killing the pilot, may have been deliberately attacked by Venezuelan authorities, The American Reporter has learned. Some 22,700 Venezuelan soldiers are deployed to guard that nation's long border with Colombia - which rebels cross, some say, with Venezuelan government approval. [MORE]

Ink Soup
WHO WAS PUSHKIN?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--It is almost a tradition that the dons of Oxford and Cambridge should dabble in mystery and detective novels on the side. Being the world's greatest expert on the Pre-Socratics, say, or the arthropoda of the Antipodes, is all very well, but it is also nice to have written something that one's children are not ashamed of. And can live on. [MORE]

Opinion
IT'S TIME FOR A NEW U.S.-IRAN AGENDA
by Ali Mashayekhi Kirk

ORLANDO, Fla. -- The year was 1979, I was 13 and living in Washington, D.C. My father was a foreign news correspondent for the Iranian state-owned television and radio station, known as NIRT. It was a year that I and many others would not forget. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
SCATOLOGY 101: NOW THEY'RE CURSING IN KINDERGARTEN
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Now, I assure you, he didn't hear these words at home; not, at least, in the context he was using them. He was angry, this little tyke in short pants and a striped shirt, standing with his feet planted firmly, his little tears dropping from his cheeks into the playground dust. Another kid had climbed up the ladder close behind him and pushed him down the slide before he was set to go. [MORE]

Market Mover
WALL STREET-INSPIRED THOUGHTS ON GRASSO, GOLF, AND GREED
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, FLA. (Sept. 22, 2003)-Since the (Dick) Grasso is always greener on the other side of Wall Street, I am now required to enumerate some disjointed thoughts on folks who "just don't get it." [MORE]

On Native Ground
HEALTH CARE COSTS, NOT AL-QAEDA, WORRY AMERICANS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What is considered a bigger worry to the average American - another 9/11-style terrorist attack or not having health insurance? [MORE]

ON Media
RECALL RADIO MISFIRES
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- The news flash last Monday that a federal court had ordered the California recall election postponed promised a rare afternoon of talk radio. In these parts, the recall is talk radio's holy crusade. [MORE]

Monday Moron
THE CAMPAIGN ROAD TO NOWHERE
Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla, -- Is it in you? [MORE]

Jill Stewart
IN RECALL CHAOS, WHO'S WORSE: THE JUDGES, OR THE PRESS?
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif., Sept. 18, 2003 -- If the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals delays the recall, pity the voters who will be subjected to months of Gray Davis faking he likes church (as when he loudly pronounced Psalms as "Palm" while praying with Bill Clinton) and faking he's a good man. [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
50 MAOISTS SLAIN IN DAYLONG CLASH IN NEPAL
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Sept. 17, 2003 -- Nepalese security forces Wednesday killed more than 50 Maoists in the Bhabang area of Rolpa district, the stronghold of Communist rebels in western Nepal, in the bloodiest clash since the breakdown of a ceasefire and peace talks three weeks ago. [MORE]

Momentum
WHEN THE LAW OF THE JUNGLE PREVAILS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's hard to be a Jew today, even an American Jew, when the headlines are screaming, "Israeli official: Killing Arafat is a possibility." [MORE]

Make My Day
DO THEY HAVE AIR ROADIES?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Ask any musician what the greatest musical instrument is, and you could easily start a riot. Some believe it's the piano, others say it's the guitar, and a few brave souls would answer the bagpipes. But while opinions vary wildly, everyone would at least agree that it's not the accordion. [MORE]

Brasch Words
HURRICANE ISABEL MAY STRAIN WARTIME BUDGETS
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- America has already spent more than $80 billion in the past year on its "war on terrorism," and the president has asked Congress for $87 billion more to rebuild Iraq. But the cost of the war - in the form of depleted Guard units, Red Cross resources, and money for social services for Hurricane Isabel - could force Americans to come face to face with the drain on U.S. resources the war has caused. [MORE]

Reporting: Washington
F.A.A. IS SUED OVER 9/11 DEATHS
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON -- The FAA has been notified that it will be sued by some survivors and relatives of victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on New York City's financial district and the Pentagon, the American Reporter has learned. [MORE]

Reporting: Nepal
AS POLITICAL CRISIS DEEPENS, U.S. MOVES TO HELP NEPAL
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, Sept. 18, 2003 -- The United States government has expressed its willingness to help Nepal defeat Maoist rebels here amid a political crisis that has deepened with the breakdown of peace talks and a ceasefire with the Maoists and a widening rift between the political parties and the king. [MORE]

On Media
LOOKING BACK ONE CENTURY
by Robert Gelfand

It is a fascinating yet strangely unsettling experience to watch the Mitchell & Kenyon films. We sit in a darkened theater, seeing the living, breathing people of the year 1903, as factory workers - adults and children alike - walk out from the gates of the factories where they work. Or we see them walking through the local fairgrounds, or watching a parade. We view their faces, observe their clothing, guess their ages, and see ourselves one step removed. [MORE]

Reporting: California Recall
U.S. PANEL BARS CALIFIFORNIA RECALL - MAYBE
by Ron Kenner

HOLLYWOOD, Calif., Sept. 15, 2003 -- This state is home to Hollywood, after all. And so, shortly after 10 a.m. today, in the last of a dozen legal challenges to the voter-mandated gubernatorial recall election that has captivated the nation, a federal appeals court in San Francisco came to the rescue of lagging Governor Gray Davis, who only days ago seemed to be facing near-certain defeat in the only serious recall effort mounted in nine decades. For Davis, it was like being the damsel in distress tied to the tracks in front of a fast-moving freight train driven by "Terminator" star Arnold Schwarzenegger and Davis's own mustachioed villain, Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante. [MORE]

Bulletin
SENATE SINKS MEDIA CROSS-OWNERSHIP RULES, 55-40
American Reporter Staff

WASHINGTON, D.C., Sept. 16, 2003, 11:37am EST -- By a wide margin, the United States Senate this morning used a new and rarely-used parliamentary device called a Resolution of Disapproval to kill implementation of so-called cross-ownership rules that would have allowed media conglomerates to own more than one tv station and newspaper in the same market. The ruling was a stinging and ignominious defeat for FCC Chairman Michael K. Powell, who had proposed the rules in the face of broad public opposition that ran 99 to 1 against his proposal. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A CARB AND A CARBURETOR?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. - Where was I when the distinction between fats, proteins, carbohydrates, nutrients, calories, cholesterol - good and bad - was taught? There are simple and complex carbohydrates. I'm in the dark. The shopping cart is filled with what we need for the week and yet John eyes each package and smirks before he says "Do you know how many trans fats are in this?"20 [MORE]

BUSH PAYS A PRICE FOR IGNORANCE OF HISTORY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Harry S Truman, one of America's greatest presidents, never stopped being a student of history. [MORE]

Media Beat
TRIUMPH OF THE MEDIA MILL
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Without a hint of intended irony, the "NewsHour" on PBS concluded its Sept. 9 program with a warm interview of Henry Kissinger and then a segment about a renowned propagandist for the Nazi war machine. Kissinger talked about his latest book. Then a professor of German history talked about Leni Riefenstahl, the path-breaking documentary filmmaker who just died at age 101. [MORE]

Market Mover
'WORLD WAR III IS HERE,' SAYS FORMER POW
by Mark Scheinbaum

COVINGTON, Ky., Sept. 11, 2003 -- Retired U.S. Navt Capt. Jerry Coffee, who spent more than seven years in a North Vietnamese POW prison cell, told a group of investment executives today that "World War III has already begun, and we have to have faith in ourselves to get through it." [MORE]

Make My Day
GO BUG SOMEONE ELSE
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Ask any granola-munching, Birkenstock-wearing tree hugger, and they'll tell you the same thing: insects are the very foundation that the entire food chain is built on. If you wipe out the insects, all life on Earth will soon vanish. [MORE]

The American Reporter Joins All Americans
In Mourning the Victims of
September 11, 2001

American Essay
THE LESSONS OF SEPTEMBER 11

by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Sept. 11, 2003 -- I am terribly conflicted about what America ought to do or think or say about the events of Sept. 11. There are days when I would like us to distance ourselves from the Israeli-Palestinian/Judeo-Islamic conflict and let these two old enemies solve their own problems in whatever way their Old Testament "eye for an eye" creeds will permit. [MORE]

Reporting: Washington
FAMILY OF MISSING 727 PILOT CAN'T GET ANSWERS
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON, Sept. 11, 2003 -- A Boeing 727 that disappeared from an Angolan airport on May 25, 2003 is still unaccounted for, and the brother of its missing flight engineer has told The American Reporter he has grown frustrated by a lack of response from the Bush administration. [MORE]

Momentum
A NATIONAL DAY OF MOURNING
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- About a month ago, when I was making a appointment with my dentist, the secretary said, "How's Sept. 11 for you?" It startled me. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SAUNA SUTRA
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--Readers may be excused for thinking that I spend most of my life in the sauna. Not so. The better part, perhaps, but not most of my life. [MORE]

On Media
IN AD DOLLAR SHOOTOUT, IT'S PRESS AGAINST PLASTIC
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif -- "San Pedro Magazine" is the name of an advertising supplement published by the Press-Telegram, a newspaper published in San Pedro's neighboring city of Long Beach. "More San Pedro" is the name of a different, soon-to-be-published, advertising supplement, the brainchild of another local newspaper, the Daily Breeze, published in another neighboring city, Torrance. Each publication is an example of what has evidently come to be the latest rage in the newspaper world, the monthly advertiser. [MORE]

Hominy & Hawsh
WHOSE MOMENT IS THIS, ANYWAY?
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When 80 years pass between her writing a line and my reading it, all the impact of that moment in her life is diminished in this moment of mine. For instance, in 1927, she wrote in bold block letters: I HAVE BOBBED MY HAIR !!! Every other line in the book and those in all succeeding years is written in her smoothly-penned Palmer Method of penmanship where an occasional splatter of ink spots betrays her haste. [MORE]

An A.R. Essay
THE POLITICAL CAPITAL OF 9/11
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The Bush administration never hesitated to exploit the general public's anxieties that arose after the traumatic events of September 11, 2001. [MORE]

An A.R. Editorial
NOW IT'S A ROAD MAP TO NOWHERE
by Joe Shea

The resignation of Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas is yet another powerful indictment of the "tilt" in U.S. policy in the Middle East that has undermined every effort by Americans to bring peace to the region. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE SCHEMERS WHO TURNED 9/11 INTO A FOREIGN POLICY DISASTER
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We're two years removed from that tragic September morning of death and destruction in New York, Washington and Pennsylvania. [MORE]

Market Mover
'PRESIDENT BILL RICHARDSON' HAS A NICE RING TO IT
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Sept. 5, 2003 -- The Democratic Party could nominate New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson, and go on to beat President George Bush the next time around, but that will never happen. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
RECALL DEBATE SLEIGHT-OF-HAND: DID YOU MISS THIS?
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Wednesday's recall debate broke little new ground as meek journalists and inexperienced citizens lobbed softballs at Gov. Gray Davis and the candidates, failed to ask the toughest questions and let false statements go unchallenged. [MORE]

Make My Day
DON'T FORGET THE RECLINER
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- The biggest complaint most married Guys have is that we don't have our privacy. Just like anyone else, we need to have a space we can call our own. A place that gives us complete and utter privacy - refuge from the outside world, our Fortress of Solitude, our Sanctum Sanctorum (from the Latin, meaning "Speak English like the rest of us!"). [MORE]

Momentum
AS DEAN SURGES AHEAD
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It was curiosity that made me drive through that millionaire's wonderland of winding dirt roads, spectacular views, large houses, manicured lawns, horses and swimming pools this past Saturday morning to hear Dr. Howard Dean, the former governor of Vermont and the current front-running Democratic presidential candidate, talk in Walpole, N.H. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
NINE-ELEVEN DÉJA VU
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- "Just want to say, I love you," words left on an answering machine in tones suggesting he had work to do - helping others. They say "pride goes before a fall" but not that day. Line after line of transcribed voices suggest a pride in doing what has to be done in their present moment. There was no evidence of whimpering, simpering, or "poor me." [MORE]

Happy Labor Day, America!

On Native Ground
IT'S TIME TO SEEK THE U.N.'S HELP IN IRAQ

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Watching the Bush administration try to find a way out of the mess it created in Iraq reminds me of something former House Speaker Sam Rayburn once said: "A jackass can kick a barn down, but it takes a carpenter to build one." [MORE]

Reporting: 9/11
FAA 'RED TEAM' FAULTS SECURITY AT U.S. AIRPORTS
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON -- The four officials chiefly responsible for aviation security at the airports where planes were hijacked on Sept. 11, 2001, are still in important and very public positions in aviation security, The American Reporter has learned, despite substantive questions about their role in that day's historic disasters. [MORE]

Monday Moron
KEEP THE TOASTER OUT OF THE TUB
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- Am I the only one who feels like a kernel inside a microwave popcorn bag every time I stroll into the garage? [MORE]

On Media
AT CINECON 2003, A WINDOW ON THE PAST
by Robert Gelfand

HOLLYWOOD, Calif -- The early history of motion pictures may help us understand the modern mass media, as I learned in Hollywood over Labor Day weekend, when several hundred film scholars, historians and enthusiasts were gathered at the historic Egyptian Theater here for 39th annual Cinecon film festival. Run by the Society of Cinephiles, Cinecon attracts people from all over the United States and Europe who gather to watch films, compare notes on film history and illuminate its future in the light of the past. [MORE]

Momentum
A DAY AT THE RACES
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Despite the popularity of Laura Hillenbrand's riveting book "Seabiscuit" and the wonderful movie that was made from it, and despite the momentary fame of the New York horse Funnycide, who won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness before fading at Belmont and losing the Triple Crown, horse racing appears to be dying in this country. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SOUP FOR GOV
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- It is of course not unusual to see Dr. Soup in a state of smoldering fury, but when he stormed into the office today I knew that this was not ordinary rage. [MORE]

Opinion
WHY DEAN AND GREEN DON'T MATCH THE PROGRESSIVE AGENDA
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- Let's take Howard Dean at his word: "I was a triangulator before Clinton was a triangulator. In my soul, I'm a moderate." [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
TO THE HANDS THAT ROCK THE CRADLES
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Modern couples write their own wedding vows and often include a Biblical quote. The one most often used is from the Book of Ruth: "Whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge; thy people shall be my people, and thy God my God." [MORE]

An A.R. Editorial
WHY SHOULDN'T WE KILL?
by Joe Shea

Civilization sprang from law, and while there may have been earlier ones, the 10 Commandments - known to Jews as the Ten Declarations - pre-date Islam by 2,100 years, Christianity by 1,400 years, Confucianism by 850 years, and Buddhism by 775 years. They are the first Law of modern civilization, and while there may be a degree of religious and academic controversy about which version of these laws represents which religion, those differences are not carved in stone. [MORE]

Monday Moron
SWEAT LIKE AN EGYPTIAN
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla. -- The thermometer reads a steady 93 degrees Celsius. The local meteorologist informs me the "feels like"-temperature is hot as, well, Florida in August (or a fresh cup of McDonald's coffee). The rain pounds the sand so viciously that my neighbor, Noah, begins to shop Amazon.com for a deal on "Ark Builder 2003." Buoyed by the conditions, the mosquitoes burgeon in stature, some now big enough to accommodate requests for an in-flight movie. One bite and the American Red Cross suggests a large glass of orange juice and a period of relaxation. I, myself, donate a pint or two during a suicide run for the trash cans. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
PUTRID SMELL WAFTS OVER THE CALIFORNIA RECALL
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Five styles have emerged in the governor's race, from the blame-game of Gov. Gray Davis to the compassionate fiscal conservatism of Peter Ueberroth and Arnold Schwarzenegger, to the tax 'em high anti-business jihad of Cruz Bustamante to the ultra-conservative cost slashing of Tom McClintock and Bill Simon. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE SHAMEFUL, SHABBY TREATMENT OF U.S. SOLDIERS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Just about every politician loves to wave the flag and say they support the troops. But the things we've seen so far in Iraq suggest otherwise. [MORE]

Momentum
WHAT'S THE BIG DEAL ABOUT GAY MARRIAGE?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Maybe I'm missing something, but when it comes to gay marriage, I don't understand the fuss. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
RECALL OPENS NEW DEBATE ON ILLEGAL IMMIGRATION
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- I am a Radical Centrist with an urge to speak freely coursing through my veins. So I squirmed with delight when former Gov. Pete Wilson blurted out on a talk show a few days back that Arnold Schwarzenegger voted for Proposition 187 in 1994 and thinks illegal immigration is a problem for California. [MORE]

SCHWEIKART URGES U.S. TO MOVE SPACE PROGRAM BEYOND NEAR EARTH ORBIT
by Lucy Komisar

LaBAULE, France - Congressional committees are expected to hold hearings in the fall, after the release Aug. 26 of the report by an independent board investigating the Columbia spacecraft disaster, and former astronaut Rusty Schweickart has some ideas for those committees, he told a French forum last March. [MORE]

Ink Soup
FULL MOON NOTES
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I am writing this on the night of the full moon, so you have been warned. But there is an up side to insomnia: columns written while the writer is wide, even painfully, awake, tend to be more interesting-all right, lucid--than those written while he is in his more customary somnolent mode. [MORE]

Breakthrough: Nanotechnology
USING ATOMS, ONE AT A TIME
by Komisar

LaBAULE, France - Man-made muscles that contract like biological ones but that are 100 times stronger, that are so powerful, they can inject drugs without a needle. [MORE]

IT'S LIFE AND DEATH, BUT THEY CALL IT 'PRIORITY RATIONING'
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Life is a game of chance but there are those out there who are trying to mark the cards. [MORE]

On Media
MIKE ROYKO, JOURNALISM AND BEER
by Robert Gelfand

CHICAGO -- Any place where Mike Royko drank ought to be a good place to think about journalism, so I went down to Billy Goat's Tavern Friday night and had a beer and thought about outrage and wit and the appropriate function of the news media. [MORE]

Reporting: Terror
AMERICAN AND THAI POLICE ARREST HAMBALI
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, Aug. 15, 2003 - American and Thai police arrested Hambali, arguably Southeast Asia's most wanted terrorist and allegedlly the second in command of the Jemaah Islamiyah terrorist network, in Ayutthaya, a small town about 80 kilometers south of Bangkok, earlier this week. He was flown Friday to an undisclosed location, probably Bahgram AFB, an American airbase in Afghanistan where many al-Qaida prisoners are jailed, for quesioning. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WAR'S REALITES COME HOME TO A SMALL VERMONT TOWN
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The war in Iraq came home to my corner of Vermont the other day. [MORE]

Across America
WHO 'RESET' THE POWER GRID?
by Joe Shea

FORT STOCKTON, Tex. -- Shortly after 1 p.m. Mountain Time in El Paso yesterday morning I walked up to the doors of the ExxonMobil station at Exit O in Anthony, Tex., and found a sign on the door: "Electric Power Outage!" it read, but inside the air conditioning was on, machines and lights were working and employees milled around aimlessly. [MORE]

Foreign Affairs
E.U. CLASH ON ADMITTING TURKEY WORRIES U.S.
by Lucy Komisar

LaBAULE, France -- People's eyes now are on Iraq, deemed by Bush officials a key factor in reshaping the Middle East. A few glances ought to shift toward its neighbor, Turkey, which could be as important for the future of the Muslim world. [MORE]

Momentum
AMERICA SLICED AND DICED
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Pictures from my niece's wedding arrived last week. [MORE]

Foreign Affairs
PARSING THE U.S.-EUROPEAN DIPLOMATIC CRISIS
by Lucy Komisar

LaBAULE, France -- The U.S. and Europe have never been so estranged. The widespread European hostility to U.S. policy on Iraq builds on anger provoked by the Bush administration's scuttling of numerous global accords on environment, weapons and international justice. The opposition to Washington policy exists on both citizen and high political levels. The rift between the U.S. and its European allies will damage America unless both sides act to heal it - and unless the U.S. acts to deal with the causes of European anger. [MORE]

Across America
ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER AND THE NEXT ENERGY CRISIS
by Joe Shea

TUCSON, Ariz., Aug. 12, 2003 -- Remember the phony claims of energy traders that unraveled into the Enron scandal and, as California Gov. Gray Davis said during his Los Angeles Times debate with Republican businessman Bill Simon, "We were bilked out of $21 billion..."? [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE BIBLE THAT ATE DOROTHY'S CANARY
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The agony of my fellow Christians in the Episcopal Church would be almost comical if it were not so heartrending. I'd started this column when Bishop Robinson's election was suddenly delayed by two accusations of sexual misconduct. I telephoned Dr. Soup to beat the bushes for some substitute topic on which we could hold forth until the diocesan bishops in Minneapolis had made up their minds. [MORE]

Market Mover
AMERICA'S VETERANS AGENCY: A TEXTBOOK FOR FAILURE
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Aug. 12, 2003 -- The Wall Street Journal deserves a Pulitzer Prize for today's report on the failures of the Veterans' Administration, but it won't get one. [MORE]

On Native Ground
SOME ADVICE TO THE DLC: WHO DARES, WINS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The buzz for former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean is getting louder. [MORE]

Make My Day
YEAH? WELL, I DOUBLE DARE YOU!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I don't know what it is with teenagers these days. [MORE]

Momentum
EVERYBODY'S GOT A HUNGRY HEART
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- At first it was, "Oh no, Bruce, no." This is no way to hear your music. [MORE]

On Media
RUDENESS RULES THE RADIO
by Robert Gelfand

LOS ANGELES -- Thursday's John and Ken radio talk show (KFI AM 640) included an interview with Rep Loretta Sanchez (D-Calif.) in which the hosts interrupted Sanchez over 30 times, yelled loudly into their microphones in order to drown out her voice, and at several points screamed at her, "Are you ignorant or are you lying?" What is of interest is that the hosts were so proud of their performance that they ran the tape again later in the same show. [MORE]

Under Fire
A SILENT KILLER STALKS U.S. TROOPS IN IRAQ
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., Aug. 1, 2003, 10.00am EST -- A mystery illness that bears some similarities to chemical and radiation poisoning has killed at least two U.S. soldiers In Iraq since June 17 and sickened another 11, said worried Army officials who this week took the unusual step of dispatching two elite epidemiological teams to investigate. [MORE]

On Native Ground
BUSH ADMINISTRATION PASSING THE BUCK ON 9/11
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Americans have been waiting a long time to find out the truth about the events leading up to the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. [MORE]

Media Beat
THE GANG THAT COULDN'T TALK STRAIGHT
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- We're living in an era when news coverage often involves plenty of absurdity. [MORE]

Make My Day
MAYBE I SHOULD DIG A MOAT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- My neighbor is stealing my lawn. [MORE]

Momentum
FOLK MUSIC AWAKENS TO ITS RADICAL ROOTS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Old folkies never die, they just go to Falcon Ridge. And this year Holly Near was there to awaken them from a long, long sleep. [MORE]

Editorial
RIORDAN SHOULD RUN
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., July 30, 2003 -- There is nothing inherently wise or beneficial in taking the governorship away from one money-hoarding politician and giving it to a well-off millionaire. But there is a benefit for all Californians in taking away the governor's mansion from Gray Davis and putting it in the hands of Richard Riordan. [MORE]

Market Mover
THE SAFE BOND MYTH DIES HARD
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., July 30, 2003 -- Just before the Fourth of July weekend, most Americans with good credit could secure a 30-year fixed mortgage for about 5.31 percent. Less than a month later, in most cities, the same mortgage might cost 6.25 percent. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
BOB HOPE: AND HE LIVED HAPPILY EVER AFTER
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Because there is so much being said about Bob Hope, I wasn't going to add my thoughts, at least until I got an email sent to the family "loop" from our son, Tom. [MORE]

"Thanks For the Memories!"
Bob Hope
1903 - 2003

Passings
AMERICA'S COMEDIAN, BOB HOPE, IS DEAD AT 100

by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., July 28, 2003 -- Bob Hope, whose century of life was a long string of wisecracks and a longer string of friends high and low, passed away last night in Toluca Lake, Calif., his legacy of gales of laughter and good memories likely to linger a century more. [MORE]

Reporting: The West in Flames
A FOREST FIRE'S LESSONS
by Mark Scheinbaum

TAOS PUEBLO, N.M., July 28, 2003 -- The competing interests of lumber, tourism, public safety, and Native American traditions all challenged firefighters this week in and around New Mexico's northernmost autonomous pueblo. [MORE]

Monday Moron
REALITY BITES
by Larry Lieberman

TAMPA, Fla -- Dammit, Scott! [MORE]

On Native Ground
EVEN BUSH CAN HEAR 'GIANT SUCKING SOUND' OF LOST JOBS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The recession is over. [MORE]

Make My Day
MY LENS IS BIGGER THAN YOURS
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I've always enjoyed photography, although I haven't always had the necessary equipment. When I took a photojournalism class in college, I fancied myself a younger, less depressing Ansel Adams, and that I was just two-hundredths of a second away from shooting dramatic news photos for the Associated Press in foreign locales. [MORE]

Momentum
THE IMPORTANCE OF KATHARINE HEPBURN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- How do we chose our icons? And how well? [MORE]

Ink Soup
BETTER THAN THAT OF NOTHING
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Dave Niehaus, the long-time radio and tv voice of the Seattle Mariners, is one of the pleasures of seeing or hearing a ball game out here. He is as beloved a feature of the whole experience as was the Scooter for Yankees fans. His "My oh my!" is the local equivalent of "Holy cow!" "Good-bye, baseball!" is the way Dave bids farewell to a ball headed for the upper deck. A grand slam deserves a bit more drama, and he is not above slathering it on: "Get out the mustard and ryebread, Grandmaw, it's time for a grand salami!!!" [MORE]

Breaking News
TWO SONS OF SADDAM KILLED IN MOSUL
American Reporter Staff

BRADE4NTON, Fla., 12:25am, July 22, 2003 -- NBC News is reporting that Saddam Hussein's relatives or sons may have been killed in a confrontation with U.S. forces in the northern city of Mosul this morning. Reuters reported the two men and one of their sons, a 14-year-old, may have been among those hiding out in a large villa in the city. [Later, Lt. Gen. Ricardo S. Sanchez told reporters that both Uday and Qusay had been killed in the raid.] [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
HERE'S TO 'THE LADIES WHO LUNCH'
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- There are times just a word, a song, a scene bring the past back into focus for a fleeting moment. [MORE]

On Media
TALK RADIO CROSSES THE LINE
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- While we stodgy intellectual types busy ourselves worrying about whether the New York Times has misplaced a semicolon, talk radio is joyfully poisoning the wells of public discourse. It's not that talk radio is a little sloppy in its journalistic practice, it's that talk radio has tossed the entire concept of journalistic integrity out the window. Take the L.A.-based John & Ken Show, for example. [MORE]

LIES ABOUT GULF WAR II ARE COMING HOME TO ROOST
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It is truly sad to see how many American soldiers are dying each week in Iraq. It is even sadder knowing that these young people are dying for a bunch of lies. [MORE]

Reporting: California
TOP DEMOCRATS JOIN FIGHT AGAINST DAVIS RECALL
by Ron Kenner

LOS ANGELES, July 17, 2003 -- With the stage set to shift the political focus this time from Florida to California - and fireworks with immense implications for the next presidential campaign ready to explode - top Democrats came out swinging yesterday in a major push to help California's Governor Gray Davis in survive a multimillion dollar recall election that seems all but certain to qualify for the ballot. [MORE]

Brasch Word
THE PRETEND CAPTAIN
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- Former Texas Air National Guard Lt. George W. Bush showed up on the U.S.S. Abraham Lincoln as President of the United States. He was trim, the result of long daily workouts, and jauntily dressed in a fighter pilot's flight suit. To sailors returning from Gulf War II he gave a speech written by taxpayer-funded speech writers. He looked just like a Navy flyer, maybe even a commander-in-chief; he said what a president should say - and recorded for broadcast around the world. [MORE]

Momentum
JOHN ASHCROFT, GET OUT OF MY UNDERWEAR!
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- While preparing to make a mold of my teeth the other day, the dentist made a little joke. [MORE]

Media Beat
IMPREACHING N.P.R.: MARA LIASSON'S DOUBLE STANDARD
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The superstar columnist George Will has an impressive vocabulary. Too bad it doesn't include the words "I'm sorry." [MORE]

Ink Soup
HAVE YOU AUTOGOOGLED?
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- There are times when I wish that I had a less ordinary name, one shared with fewer people, something along the lines of those splendid members of Cromwell's parliament, the Barebones brothers. One was named Paisegod Barebones and the other, probably the younger, If Christ Had Not Died Thou Hadst Been Damned Barebones. The latter is said to have been known in the family as Damned. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
UP TO MY HIPS IN DALEY-GATORS*
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- I was once the old lady who lived in a shoe with plenty of room for kids and enough space left over for assorted dogs, cats, rabbits, turtles, tropical fish, a gecko and a bird. [MORE]

Analysis
OIL INTERESTS MAY FIGURE IN SAO TOME COUP
by Joe Shea

BRADENTON, Fla., July 16, 2003 -- The tiny nation of Sao Tome and Principe - the smallest, poorest and most peaceful democracy in Africa - fell victim to a sudden military coup in the hours before dawn Wednesday, and there is little doubt that oil politics are the cause. San Tome's President Fradique de Menezes was in Nigeria on a "private visit" when the coup took place, according to Nigerian officials who strongly condemned the coup. [MORE]

Jill Stewart
DAVIS GATHERS CASH HOARD TO FIGHT RECALL
by Jill Stewart

SACRAMENTO -- As the effort to recall California Gov. Gray Davis moves into overdrive and the noxious consultant Chris Lehane - who helped President Bill Clinton formulate his creepy Monica Lewinsky strategy - prepares to launch an assault on the truth unlike anything we've witnessed in a California election, a phrase keeps circling inside my head. Follow the money. [MORE]

On Native Ground
WAIST-DEEP IN IRAQ MESS, BUSH PRESSES ON
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's tough to definitively designate the single stupidest statement ever uttered by President Bush, but his recent ill-advised challenge to the Iraqis who have been attacking U.S. forces - "Bring them on!" - would certainly be near the top of the list. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
INDONESIAN JOURNALISM: FROM LIBERATION TO DEFAMATION
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, Indonesia, July 10, 2003 -- It began in June last year when Kompas, Indonesia's largest daily newspaper, published a report about former president Abdurrahman Wahid's intention to remove a young politician from his key party post. Kompas quoted "a source" as saying that Cholil Bisri, a senior member of the party, had objected to Wahid's proposal and threatened to resign if secretary-general Saifullah Yusuf was removed. Wahid reportedly said that Yusuf was involved in "money politics" -a practice of vote buying among Indonesian politicians. [MORE]

Momentum
A TRIBUTE TO THE LATE GREAT KATE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- How do I love you, Katharine Hepburn? Let me count the ways. [MORE]

Reporting: Washington
9/11 COMMISSION TELLS OF 'DRAMATIC' FINDINGS, MANY DIFFICULTIES
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON, July 8 -- The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States has released its first interim teport, saying that the Commission's first six months have produced great progress and will shed "dramatic new light" on America's worst terrorist attacks, but has much more work ahead. [MORE]

Media Beat
SUMMERTIME ... AND THE MONEY IS EASY
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- While President Bush's re-election campaign accumulates an unprecedented pile of dollars, the country's news media are deep in a rut of reporting about the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. With the next national Election Day scarcely 15 months away, most signs point to a new triumph for the politics of money. [MORE]

Ink Soup
CATCH ME IF YOU CAN
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- "Have a nice day! Have a nice day!" Hearing this incessant wish from people who could not care less what sort of day you're about to have can spoil the day for those who might otherwise have actually had a nice one. My friend Paul Fussell, the famous curmudgeon, and author of best-selling books about literature, war, and uniforms, had an answer to this: [MORE]

On Media
EXPONENTIALLY WRONG
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- My savings account is growing exponentially, but also very slowly. The Internet is probably not growing exponentially. These statements are arguably true but would likely be challenged by a large number of mathematically-challenged writers and editors who increasingly misuse an important term. [MORE]

AN AR Editorial
SEN. CARL LEVIN 'BOWELS' 'EM OVER
by Joe Shea

As of July 9, 2003, U.S. Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) is chairing a U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee investigation - and a cover-up, we suspect - of the origins of the lie about Iraq's search for uranium that was contained in the live, televised State of the Union speech President George W. Bush gave to a joint session of Congress in late January. The White House admitted on July 7 that the information used by the President to gain support for the war against Iraq was not credible and should not have been used because it was based on forged documents. That admission only comes after we learned the lie was debunked by the intelligence community and by a U.S. Ambassador at least five months before the President's speech. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THANKS TO THE NET, HOWARD DEAN HITS THE BIG TIME
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- They aren't laughing anymore. [MORE]

Reporting: Bulgaria
AMID HIS MAGNIFICENT MUSIC, A TERRIBLE ISOLATION
by Lionel Rolfe

SOFIA, BULGARIA -- Angel Stankov, Bulgaria¹s preeminent violinist and conductor, knows that his country has a terrible reputation. It's partly a reputation earned by benign neglect. People just don¹t know much about this nation of under 7.6 million people. [MORE]

Market Mover
A BET ON PANAMA AS 'HUB' OF AMERICAS
by Mark Scheinbaum

PANAMA CITY, Panama -- Panama and its famed canal might make the perfect home for a "capital" of the Americas, but it looks as if both Central and South America will lose out to "North" America. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
THE OLD AND THE NEW NATIONALISM: JAKARTA AND ACEH
by Andreas Harsono

BANDA ACEH, Indonesia -- I left Jakarta for Banda Aceh earlier this month with a big question in my mind: When does one expression of nationalism become old, probably senile and irrelevant - wand when is a new one strong, vigorous and relevant? [MORE]

On Native Ground
EXPLANATIONS FOR ASCHROFT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Attorney General John Ashcroft believes the press needs to do a better job explaining the U.S.A Patriot Act to the American people. [MORE]

Media Beat
BIG MONEY TOUTS DEMOCRATS IN 2004 RACE
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- The corporate Democrats who greased Bill Clinton's path to the White House are now a bit worried. Their influence on the party's presidential nomination process has slipped. But the Democratic Leadership Council can count on plenty of assistance from mainstream news media. [MORE]

Momentum
THE HUMAN SIDE OF ECONOMICS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Writing about socially responsible businesses last week made me wonder what has gone wrong with our economic system in the first place. Shouldn't all businesses be socially responsible? Aren't we all living on the same planet? Aren't we all interconnected? Isn't it true that no man is an island? [MORE]

Ink Soup
FOR WHOM THE CELL TOLLS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I can't help it. I've written about cell phones before, but it seems to me that the ubiquity of this device is bound to affect our perception of language itself. [MORE]

Brasch Words
JOINING THE SEPARATED POWERS
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- The Supreme Court received advice from a self-proclaimed constitutional scholar, civil rights analyst, and national educator recently. Yes, that was President George W. Bush. [MORE]

Market Mover
WAKE UP, AMERICA! YOUR KIDS ARE READING!
by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., June 25, 2003 -- Harry Potter, boy wizard extraordinaire, please meet NBA star-turned-motivational speaker-actor John Salley. For that matter, meet Dennis Rodman and Michael Jordan. [MORE]

Native Ground
IN A NATION OF LAWS, BUSH MUST BE IMPEACHED
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt., June 24, 2003 - "It's not about the sex, it's about the lying." [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
ACEHNESE LIVE IN GRIM SHADOWS OF CIVIL WAR
by Andreas Harsono

BANDA ACEH, Indonesia, June 19, 2003 -- It was probably a regular exchange but the clatter of American M-16s mixed with the return fire of Russian-made AK-101 automatic rifles was enough to create a terrible fear in a small village here. [MORE]

On Native Ground
A WAR BUILT ON LIES
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Those of us who opposed Gulf War II knew that history would eventually prove us right. What we didn't expect is that it would happen so soon. [MORE]

Media Beat
WHY BRITAIN INHABITS A NOT-QUITE-PARALLEL MEDIA UNIVERSE
by Norman Solomon

LONDON -- The people of Britain and the United States are living in parallel, yet substantively different, media universes. Bonds of language and overlaps of mass culture are obvious. But a visit to London quickly illuminates the reality that mainstream journalism is much less narrow here than in America. [MORE]

Make My Day
SNAKES HAVE FEELINGS TOO, YOU KNOW!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Scientists call them herpetologists. I call them weirdos. [MORE]

Momentum
SOME GOOD NEWS ABOUT CAPITALISM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Even if we don't remember Donald J. Carty's name, most of us remember his story. [MORE]

Ink Soup
TALKING TOWER: THE LAST HUMAN DISTINCTION
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE. Wash.--In the Book of Genesis the nine brisk little verses that open the 11th chapter are hardly more than a brief respite from the exhaustive and boring inventory of the descendants of Noah, Shem, Ham, and Japheth. [MORE]

THE SPAMMING OF AMERICA: ANOTHER BRICK IN THE WALL
by Norman Solomon

SAN FRANCISCO -- By now, millions of Americans are sick and tired of the spam that's flooding their in-boxes with unwanted e-mail messages - mostly offering products, services and scams that tell of big bargains, implausible windfalls, garish porno and dumb scenarios for bodily enhancements. In 2003, we're routinely slogging through large amounts of junk e-mail. [MORE]

Commentary
AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY IS BETTER THAN 'THE MATRIX'
by Doug Lasken

LOS ANGELES, Calif. -- In my last article for The American Reporter, "Orwell's Vision is still alive in 2003," I suggested parallels between the management of reality in Orwell's dystopias and manipulation of information in the modern world. [MORE]

On Media
MAILERS ARE THE ULTIMATE POLITICAL CON GAME
by Robert Gelfand

SAN PEDRO, Calif. -- In the next 12 months, you'll come to realize the importance of those three little words in the middle of the oath taken in court. Witnesses are sworn "to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth." It has become painfully clear that "the whole truth" gets left behind in political advertising. [MORE]

Market Mover
WHAT'S AT STAKE WHEN THE F.C.C. ENABLES BIG BROTHER?
by Marybeth Brennan

LAKE WORTH, Fla., June 2, 2003 -- If you want the "Big Brother" of George Orwell's "1984" to become a reality, just support the Federal Communications Commission's actions to increase media monopolies. [MORE]

Make My Day
LIAR, LIAR, PANTS ON FIRE
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I don't know exactly why it happened, but journalists are held in the same contempt as lawyers and used car salesmen. We're branded as lying muckrakers, all thanks to a few dishonest reporters who decided it would be much easier to make up their stories, rather than tell the truth. [MORE]

Editorial
LEAVING L.A.
by Joe Shea

Fare well, Los Angeles, and farewell. Along with my wife and daughter, I am leaving tomorrow after a 27 year-run that has been incredible. I don't know how you'll get along without me, but you didn't have a house or an apartment in our price range in all your 468 square miles, so we're going to Florida to live for a pittance. [MORE]

On Native Ground
ROBERT ST. JOHN: A PEACEFUL WARRIOR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- With the various scandals and misdeeds of late, journalism has fallen into a general state of disrepute. We who still believe in the power of journalism to affect social change are starving for inspiration. [MORE]

Media Beat
MANY A JEST SPOKEN AS TRUTH
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- National Public Radio deserves credit for finally airing a candid summary of how media spin works at the top of the Executive Branch. [MORE]

REPORT FROM FRANCE: 'THE WORLD IS A MESS'
by Larry Bridwell

LA BAULE, FRANCE -- "The world is a mess" was a phrase heard frequently at the Forum 21 conference held here recently. And the term likened the transAtlantic impact from the American-led war in Iraq to a "fragmentation bomb." [MORE]

Momentum
A FAILURE OF JOURNALISM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When I was working in daily journalism, I continually irritated the night editors with my frantic calls begging them to change a word in a story or make a sentence clearer. And I would often wake up in the middle of the night, panicked that I had misattributed a quote or gotten a tax figure wrong. [MORE]

Foreign Affairs
RUMSFELD QUERIED ON OFFSHORE BANKING REFORM
by Lucy Komisar

NEW YORK -- It hasn't been reported in the U.S. press - until here, now - but Milan, Italy's chief prosecutor has obtained thousands of documents that show how for more than 20 years Saddam Hussein used the Western bank and corporate secrecy system to launder bribes skimmed from oil revenues to pay his security forces and buy Western arms during international embargoes. [MORE]

On Native Ground
CONTROL THE PICTURES, CONTROL THE TRUTH
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President Bush's "war on terror" has been a war that's been long on stagecraft and short on results. The recent terror bombings in Saudi Arabia and Morocco, the continuing civil chaos in Iraq and the resurgence of the warlords in Afghanistan are just the latest examples of this. [MORE]

Media Beat
DECODING THE MEDIA FIXATION ON TERRORISM
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- By now, it's a media ritual. Whenever the U.S. government raises the alert level for terrorism - as when officials announced the orange code for "high risk" on May 20 - local, regional and national news stories assess the dangers and report on what's being done to protect us. We're kept well-informed about how worried to be at any particular time. But all that media churning includes remarkably little that has any practical utility. [MORE]

Happy Birthday, America!

Momentum
AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE MEANS SOMETHING ON LT. SPAULDING'S HILL

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "Auction March 2, 1871" reads the poster announcing the sale of a 65-acre farm belonging to "the late widow Spaulding." There was "running water to house and barn, plenty of wood on the place and a very good apple orchard." Also one pair of oxen weighing 3,800 pounds together, two cows, a three-year-old steer "nearly fat," a Spring calf, a horse, a "cosset sheep" and a cart. [MORE]

On Native Ground
BUSH TO AMERICA: CAN YOU HANDLE THE TRUTH?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If you thought President Bush's "Top Gun" photo-op on the flight of the U.S.S Abraham Lincoln was the ultimate in political opportunism, just wait until the 2004 Republican National Convention. [MORE]

Media Beat
WHY THE FCC'S RULES MATTER
by Norman Solomo

SAN FRANCISCO -- Media outlets are the lifeblood of the body politic. Extensive circulation of ideas, information, analysis and debate must exist - not just once in a while, but all the time - or the consequences are severe, even catastrophic. [MORE]

Momentum
THE CREEPING KEENE-ISM OF BRATTLEBORO
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Call me elitist. [MORE]

Make My Day
IT'S A NICE PLACE TO VISIT, BUT ...
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- We live in an interesting country with some pretty interesting names. Nowhere else in the world can names of cities induce the same laughs, guffaws, and rolled eyes that American cities can. At least, that's what I'm told. I don't get out much. [MORE]

Reporting: OKC Bombing
TERRY NICHOLS HELD FOR MURDER TRIAL
by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, May 13, 2003 -- The man already serving a federal life term for conspiracy in the Oklahoma City federal building bombing was held over for state court trial Tuesday on 160 counts of first-degree murder. [MORE]

Ink Soup
WHY I MISS THE WAR
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE. Wash.--I miss the war. No, honestly. It was better to have a subject that you had to avoid than to have no subject at all. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
GENTLE SHADES OF JAYSON BLAIR
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Surprising how long it took for the New York Times to discover its 27-year-old reporter Jayson Blair was fabricating the truth in his articles. They had a "heads up" on July 21, 2001, when the paper unearthed an investigation at the University of Virginia where 122 students were suspected of plagiarizing the term paper for a course in physics. [MORE]

Congratulations to Norman Solomon
upon winning
The ACLU of South Bay
1st Annual Upton Sinclair "Uppie" Award

Media Beat
AN INTROSPECTIVE MEDIA IS NOT IN THE CARDS

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- A new poll tells us that - by a two-to-one margin - Americans "use clearly positive words in their descriptions of the president." The Pew Research Center, releasing a nationwide survey on May 7, declared "there is little doubt ... that the war in Iraq has improved the president's image" in the United States. [MORE]

On Native Ground
PRESIDENT BUSH'S DUBIOUS ECONOMIC ACHIEVEMENTS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In the first two years of George W. Bush's presidency, more than two million Americans lost their jobs. He's well on his way to becoming the first president since Herbert Hoover to preside over an actual decline in employment in the U.S. [MORE]

Breakthrough: SARS
HOPE FOR A QUICK CURE FOR SARS IS RISING
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, May 9, 2003 -- Chances that a proposed drug for use against SARS will prove effective against the deadly pneumonia epidemic were sharply improved by findings that only insignificant mutations are occurring in the cornoavirus identified as its cause, according to a respected British medical journal, making it a stable target for rapidly-produced "antisense" drugs that prime the immune system to prepare it for the SARS virus and then attack it when the victim is infected. [MORE]

Momentum
THE ANTI-SPIDER-MAN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What does it mean when, in the same week, New Hampshire's Old Man of the Mountain crumbles to the ground, a horse named Funny Cide beats horses named Empire Maker and Peace Rules in the Kentucky Derby, and, more to the point, President George W. Bush steps off a plane onto an aircraft carrier with what looks like a banana stuffed into his pants? [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE DEATH AND RESURRECTION OF DR. SOUP
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Dr. Soup was happily signing copies of his latest book "How to Get Credit for Writing Ink Soup Without Actually Writing It," when a woman whom he vaguely recognized as one of his former wives took a Colt .45 out of her purse, smiled briefly, and shot him through the forehead. [MORE]

Market Mover
REFLECTIONS ON WHAT AMERICA IS
by Mark Sscheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., May 5, 2003 -- Much of the world is still debating the rationale and results of the U.S. battlefield victory in Iraq, so maybe it's time for this non-politician to reflect on the true greatness of our land. [MORE]

PLAYING SPIN THE BATTLE: 'SHOCK AND AWE' AND AMERICAN IGNORANCE
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- More than half of all Americans believe that Saddam Hussein was personally involved in the 9/11 terrorist attacks. According to an Associated Press poll conducted shortly after the conclusion of the successful invasion of Iraq, 53 percent of the nation pin the 9/11 murders on Saddam, something the CIA and most of the world's intelligence-gathering organizations have consistently discounted. [MORE]

Breakthrough: SARS
An AR Exclusive: AMERICAN FIRM CREATES FIRST RAPID TEST FOR SARS
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- The first quick and reliable test to detect the deadly SARS virus in humans is in the hands of the U.S. Army's Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (U.S.AMRIID) and has been shipped to the World Health Organization, the American Reporter has learned. The test was developed by a privately-held life sciences firm, EraGen Biosciences, of Madison, Wisc. [MORE]

Momentum
TAKE YOUR MOTHER TO WORK DAY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Hey, Mom just got a job. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: TABOO!
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Are there any left? Taboos, that is. Personally, I still hold a few: for instance, I would never wear a plaid shirt with striped slacks - never - and yet it's perfectly acceptable today, in fact designers plan a line around that concept. [MORE]

On Native Ground
REBUILDING IRAQ BY SELLING OUT THE IRAQIS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- War, as Karl von Clausewitz wrote, is "nothing but the continuation of state policy with other means." [MORE]

Momentum
THE WAR AT HOME: WHAT'S THE SCORE?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Randy and I were driving down to Hatfield, Mass., to spend Easter Sunday with his family when we decided not to talk about the war. [MORE]

Market Mover
AMERICAN AIRLINES: FLYING WITH THE DEVIL
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla.m April 23, 2003 -- Let's say you're anti-union. Always have been, always will be. Well, on this round, you can still root for the unionized employees of American Airlines. [MORE]

Ink Soup
ADMINISTER THIS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Here is an exercise in translation. Suppose the U.S.A were something like Iraq. Could we draw a sort of cultural map? [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
PUBLIC ENEMY NUMBER ONE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When I tried to find the list of America's Most Wanted, I was referred to a television program by that name. No, I would say, not just a hit or miss, catch them where you can, turn them in, call an 800 number, no, not that Most Wanted List. I'm looking for Public Enemies number one through say, 100. I couldn't find it. [MORE]

Make My Day
AN ALTERNATIVE TO CORPORAL PUNISHMENT
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I was never a big fan of spankings in school, mostly because I was on the receiving end (no pun intended). But I've always wondered if the discipline problems in schools can be directly linked to the elimination to corporal punishment. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
THE TERRORIST'S WIFE: AN INTERVIEW WITH THE WIFE OF THE MAN CHARGED WITH THE BALI BOMBING
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA - How do you feel when your beloved husband is suddenly arrested, dragged to jail, and then nationally publicized as the chief suspect in the Bali terrorist bombing that killed 202 people last October? [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE WAR I SAW
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I didn't watch a single minute of the Gulf War II coverage on television, but I saw what was happening in Iraq more clearly than I would have otherwise. [MORE]

Momentum
FOR LACK OF A 'BEAUTIFUL MIND'
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- For lack of a beautiful mind, I care about the Iraqi dead and wounded. I care about the looting and destruction. I care about the lies and hypocrisy of my government and what comes next: the profiteering and the attempt to convert the Iraqis to Christianity. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE UNNATURAL
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.--It is a slander that my success is due to the fact that Bob Melvin, the new manager of the Seattle Mariners, was a student of mine. I gave him a C+. [MORE]

Commentary
RAGE IS A ROAD WE HAVE NOT TRAVELED
by Martha Gibson

MONTPELIER, Vt. -- This morning, in my armchair, I sit weeping, still weeping from last night, when I tuned in to the news and witnessed yet another crime of rage. [MORE]

8th Anniversary Essay
FROM THE CHAOS OF ORDER
by Joe Shea

I had the good fortune last Thursday to attend a seminar at the University of Southern California on "The Economy and Iraq." All four experts - one was a knighted Englishman on loan to the college - told us of a gloomy world where oil shortages are a fact of life, strategic moves are costly and counterproductive, news media are increasingly compromised and the world economy is more fragile than ever. There was just one problem: all four were probably wrong. [MORE]

On Native Ground
KEEPING PEACE HARDER THAN WAGING WAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So the gloating has begun. [MORE]

Media Beat
A LETHAL WAY TO 'DISPATCH' THE NEWS
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- In times of war, journalists can serve as vital witnesses for the people of the world. So it's especially sinister when governments take aim at reporters and photographers. [MORE]

The American Reporter
proudly celebrates today
Our 8th Anniversary
1995 - 2003

An AR Exclusive
WELL-CONNECTED IN L.A., ALLEGED CHINESE SPY GAVE THOUSANDS TO REPUBLICAN CANDIDATES

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, April 10, 2003 -- The American Reporter has learned that Katrina Leung, an alleged Chinese spy, who was a director of the influential Los Angeles World Affairs Council and a longtime California Republican Party activist, was a donor to Republican candidates at least since 1998 and as recently as last December. She was arrested and charged with espionage Wednesday in Los Angeles Federal Court. [MORE]

BAGHDAD FALLS!

American Reporter Staff

BAGHDAD, Iraq, April 9, 2003 -- Cheering crowds filled the streets of central Baghdad Wednesday as a Marine tank crew helped Iraqis tear down a huge cast-iron statue of Saddam Hussein and saw them drag the dictator's bullet-riddled symbolic head down a broad central avenue while his former subjects kicked and spat on it. [MORE]

Editorial
INTO THE WINDS OF WAR
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, April 8, 2003 -- Will the Arab world see the U.S. capture of Baghdad as fair compensation for the loss of the World Trade Center towers and 3,000 American lives? As strange as that question may seem, its answer will probably be central to the way Americans are seen in the Middle East long after the battle for Iraq has ended. [MORE]

THE VERMONT WINTER OF MY DISCONTENT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I don't mind admitting that this long Vermont winter has me whipped. [MORE]

Ink Soup
HIS CONVICTION IS PROOF OF CHARACTER
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- One of the four ministers of my church is Peter Ilgenfritz, an intense young man with definite views about how the precepts of religion should be honored in our actual life. [MORE]

Commentary
OSAMA: UNWANTED, DEAD OR ALIVE?
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON -- Without a Ouija board to provide the right answer, logical interpretation of the facts suggests that Osama bin Laden died in late 2001. [MORE]

On Native Ground
NO WAR PLAN SURVIVES FIRST CONTACT WITH THE ENEMY
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Who knows better about sending a military force into battle? The generals and planners at the Pentagon or an administration that's heavy on ideology but extremely light on combat experience? [MORE]

War On Iraq
U.S. TROOPS IN BAGHDAD; NO BANNED WEAPONS FOUND
American Reporter Staff

LOS ANGELES, April 4, 2003 -- U.S. and allied troops pushed closer to the center of Baghdad today without encountering significant resistance or any of the weapons of mass destruction that were the principal reason for the war. At the same time, the lack of resistance suggests that U.S. military experts made a critical error in 1991 when they failed to take the first Gulf War to the conclusion that was sought today. [MORE]

Momentum
THE MANY IRONIES OF WAR
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We're living in a time of funhouse mirrors - without the fun. [MORE]

Ink Soup: THE YEARS
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- In case the news has depressed you lately, I have a remedy: go to what Walter Winchell used to call the moompitcher show. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash: THE CLUMSY FEET OF APRIL
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Is there a poet with thoughts of a new beginning who doesn't turn those thoughts toward April? The muse imbues their steadying thought: that once again in the tufts of grass, small buds sprouting on dead branches, and in a glimpse of yellow or red or green bleeding through shoots pushed up from the cold earth, April is here. [MORE]

Caring
CUYAMACA SUNDAY MORNING COMIN' 'ROUND
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Breakfast at the lake. Hot coffee and wind on the water. We came up early Sunday morning just to get out of time - town, I mean. [MORE]

Commentary
ON WAR DAY, PRESIDENT'S NOTE ENCOURAGED NAVY GRAD
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- Although the occasion received little coverage, United States Attorney General John Ashcroft's son Andrew graduated from Navy Officer Candidate School on March 20 from the Pensacola Naval Air Station. My longtime friend Dave McDermott's son Sean was his roomate, and when I had lunch with Dave on Thursday, he told me some nice stories and showed some snapshots. [MORE]

Media Beat
MEDIA OBSESSED WITH WARTECH, WARTAC
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTION -- Two months ago, when I wandered through a large market near the center of Baghdad, the day seemed like any other and no other. A vibrant pulse of humanity throbbed in the shops and on the streets. Meanwhile, a fuse was burning; lit in Washington, it would explode here. [MORE]

On Native Ground
GULF WAR II: U.S. AND BRITAIN DEFY INTERNATIONAL LAW
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Picture President Bush and Saddam Hussein sharing a cell in The Hague after they have been tried and convicted for crimes against humanity. [MORE]

Momentum
SHOULD WE MARCH FOR PEACE IN A TIME OF WAR?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- War or peace, war or peace. Which side are you on? [MORE]

Commentary
A PRAYER FOR THE WAR
by Joe Shea

If I were President of the United States, even though I am a Catholic and would feel compelled to make the Sign of the Cross before I began, I would have started this war with a prayer. I would have said to our Maker, "God, I know that war is an abysmal failure I have come to; I am here in the place where my heart cannot forgive and my mind cannot be at peace; I must make war, however wrong. I am human, God, and full of flaws and errors; forgive me my shortcomings, and do not let them be the cause of hardship and misery for my brave soldiers, who must fight for me in the terrible days ahead. Forgive my my arrogance, for I have not humility, though I would have it; forgive me my pride, for I have not innocence, though I would; forgive me my anger, for I do not have peace within me; forgive me the dark angels of my spirit, Lord of All, for I do not have your angels on my side." [MORE]

Ink Soup
HOW TO IN TEN
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, WASH. -- Hello, boys and girls, this is your uncle, Doctor Soup, here to give you, gratis, one of the great lessons in living. I'm going to tell you how to write a newspaper column when you grow up. [MORE]

War On Iraq
SANDSTORM SLOWS ALLIED PUSH; STOCKS RECOVER AS BUSH DECLARES, 'WE WILL PREVAIL'
American Reporter Staff

MARCH 25, 3:35pm EST -- A blinding sandstorm dramatically slowed the allied advance on Baghdad late Monday as supply lines stretching 250 miles southwards into Kuwait were attacked by irregulars and Iraqi Army units that had been bypassed by the main coalition force. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
CONQUER WE MUST*
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- President George W. Bush stood before all of us that Inauguration Day in 2001, raised his right hand, and said aloud: "I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States." He is taking care of business; let him do his job. [MORE]

Caring
THE DELICATE ETIQUETTE OF DEATH
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I am about as pro-life as they come, yet when it comes to control over the time, place and manner of our deaths, I refuse to be so dogmatic. There is a big difference between someone taking a life that is not their own, and wanting to end one's own life when it has become unbearable due to terminal illness. [MORE]

Market Mover
FROM ANTWERP TO BOCA: RANDOM NOTES AT DAWN OF WAR
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., March 24, 2003 -- I was in Paris the day Gulf War II broke out. Two days later I was back in Florida with a head full of notes. A few newspapers and Websites call me a business columnist. But I'll always be an old New York and New Jersey police reporter at heart. [MORE]

War On Iraq
COALITION BOMBS BAGHDAD AS U.S. CASUALTIES RISE; U.S. SOLDIER KILLS 1, WOUNDS 13; U.S. PATRIOT MISSILE DOWNS BRITISH PLANE
American Reporter Staff

BAGHDAD, March 23, 2003, 3:20am -- As muezzins called the faithful to prayer in Baghdad this Sunday morning, coalition bombers unloaded their ordnance on a silent, sleeping Baghdad where not even anti-aircraft tracers rose to resist. That was not the case near the southern port city of Basra and inland Nasiriyah, however, an critical "hub" city where war commander Gen. Tommy Franks said caolition forces had suffered "significant" casualties in their rapid march towards Baghdad. [MORE]

'SHOCK AND AWE!'

American Reporter Staff

BAGHDAD, March 22, 2003, 2:45am -- In a blinding series of bomb blasts the Gulf War II coalition unleashed the promised "shock and awe" campaign Friday morning, even as the U.S. reported its first in-combat casualties, encountered the first significant resistance, and an Iraqi division leader surrendered to the Marines as they pushed towards Iraq's capital. [MORE]

Reporting: Bulgaria
BULGARIA, LONELY U.S. ALLY IN IRAQ FIGHT, SHARED CONCERN FOR JEWS
by Lionel Rolfe

SOFIA, Bulgaria -- My guide here, Boriana Andreewa, must have been a bit confused about whether I really wanted to see Sofia's Central Synagogue. In the morning, she asked if I wanted to; I did and didn't, I said, sounding negative when I really did want to go. She didn't mention it again until we were walking in central Sofia; it was nearby and we would be there in a moment. [MORE]

A.R. Exclusive
PRO-WAR PROTEST OK'D FOR OSCAR SITE, BUT antiwar PROTEST BARRED
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- An Orange County-based coalition of Vietnamese Republicans announced Friday that they will demonstrate with a well-known homeless leader on Sunday the corner of Hollywood Blvd. and Highland Ave., the site of the 75th Annual Academy Awards, even though that area is off-limits to protests, Hollywood Division Capt. Michael Downing told the American Reporter this afternoon. [MORE]

ANARCHY-TINGED PORTLAND PROTESTS MAY SPREAD
by Joshua Frank

PORTLAND, Ore., March 21, 2003 -- Several thousand protesters descended upon downtown Portland Thursday afternoon and stayed until some were arrested Friday morning in the second major protest of the U.S. invasion of Iraq here since last Saturday. [MORE]

On Native Ground
A DUTY TO SPEAK UP
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle expressed the views of many in America when he said: "I am saddened that this President failed so miserably at diplomacy that we're now forced to war. Saddened that we have to give up one life, because this President couldn't create the kind of diplomatic effort that was so critical for our country." [MORE]

Momentum: MASTERS OF WAR
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Whenever my beloved America makes the mistake of choosing might over right, I turn to Bob Dylan's early masterpiece, "Masters of War." [MORE]

Market Mover
MORE THAN JUST IRAQ STRAINS EUROPE'S FUTURE
by Mark Scheinbaum

ANTWERP, Belgium, Mar. 18, 2003 -- Queen Elizabeth cancelled a visit to Belgium this past week because of international tensions, and one London daily's headlines now spell the name of France's Jacques Chirac as Chiraq. These are just signs of rough times between the Euro World, the United Kingdom World, and the Rest of the World. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
GRIFTERS, CON ARTISTS, FLIM FLAMS, GYPSIES AND SCAMS
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It's not original to say, but there's no better way to say it: "The more things change, the more they remain the same." [MORE]

FIRST U.S. CASE OF MYSTERY PNEUMONIA SUSPECTED IN LOS ANGELES
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, March 17, 2003 -- Los Angeles Co. Health Department officials reported this afternoon that a suspected single case of SARS, a previously unknown form of pneumonia that started in China last month and threatens to become an epidemic, has been reported here in a man who flew in from the Far East and passed through LAX last week, the agency said today. [MORE]

Editorial
A WAR THAT CANNOT BE MADE RIGHT
by Joe Shea

The dogs of war are barking fiercely in their fragile cages tonight, and it appears they may be break loose any time now. North Korea has begun production of plutonium, the fine white powder that is deadlier than anthrax and far easier to distribute (if it has soldiers willing to go on suicide missions). [MORE]

Caring
TEA ON THE NINTH HOLE
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- The closest thing to Mr. Magoo I've ever seen. The proverbial ugly cute thing: bald with residual tufts of withered Pampas grass covering the temples on both sides. At least there's basic symmetry in the shrubbery that's left on the great white dome. His glasses' lens are so thick his magnified blue eyes look like ocular carp swimming in aqueous fluid. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE ESSENCE OF WAR IS DEATH
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "War today is smells ... smells of chemicals being dropped from the sky to set houses on fire. Smells from burning oil dumps. Smells of roasting human flesh. [MORE]

Make My Day
'THAT'S NOT A KNIFE. THIS IS A KNIFE'
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I have Zero Patience for Zero Tolerance. It's narrow, unwavering, and rigid in its enforcement, and allows for absolutely no flexibility on the part of its zealots. [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
POWELL BLAMED FOR 'MISTAKE' IN MY LAI MASSACRE
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Calif., March 13, 2003 -- A former White House covert operations official has told The American Reporter that Secretary of State Colin L. Powell, then a military aide to the U.S. Army command staff in Vietnam, misunderstood a general's instructions and mistakenly ordered the notorious March 16, 1968, My Lai massacre, and successfully covered up his error until now. The former official's allegations concerning the events, whose 35th anniversary occurs on Sunday, could not immediately be confirmed. [MORE]

Momentum
WHERE HAS ALL THE MONEY GONE?
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Town Meetings are over for another year, and like people all over the country, Vermonters are in sticker shock. [MORE]

Burns Out
'ONCE MORE UNTO THE BREACH' - OF TRUST
by Maggie Burns

WASHINGTON -- Shakespeare's Henry the Fifth contains some of the great warlike speeches of all time -- "Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more!" - and its poetry has been pillaged for every English war since it was written in 1599. [MORE]

Ink Soup
CRYPTIC CLUES
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- It is humiliating for an old newspaper veteran such as your humble servant to learn so late in life a saying that might have eased his burden far sooner. I pass it along, since it concerns you as much as it does me, for you, the newspaper reader, are in fact the party meant by "they." [MORE]

Caring
BIRDSONGS FOR ALCATRAZ
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Mornings can be difficult. I am not sure why that is but I do know that sometimes birdsong can save your soul. Their sweet melodies pierce through the viscous muck of depression that clings to me in the early hours of the day. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE LAMPS ARE GOING OUT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- This is a very weird time. [MORE]

Media Beat
U.S MEDIA DODGES U.N. SURVEILLANCE STORY
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Three days after a British newspaper revealed a memo about U.S. spying on U.N. Security Council delegations, I asked Daniel Ellsberg to assess the importance of the story. "This leak," he replied, "is more timely and potentially more important than the Pentagon Papers." [MORE]

Editorial
WHEN WILL THE WAR BE?
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, March 6, 2003 -- As he prepares to speak to the world tonight, President Bush surveys a diplomatic landscape more daunting than any Bosnian minefield. The reluctance of Russia, France and Germany - and now, formally, China - to support a second resolution authorizing the use of force against Saddam Hussein's Iraqi regime has irrecoverably stranded his team's effort to get the world on his side on a proposed invasion of Iraq. [MORE]

Make My Day
I'VE GOT THIS BRIDGE I'D LIKE TO SELL YOU
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I realized I had finally made my mark in the world when I received my very own Nigerian scam letter, addressed to me. When Nigerian scam artists put your name on a letter, rather than addressing it with an impersonal "Dear Friend," you've obviously done something important. [MORE]

Momentum
IF PROTESTING DOESN'T WORK, THEN PARTY
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- O.K., you've sent your plastic baggies of white rice to the President of the United States, marched in freezing weather several times for peace, gotten into the habit of reading the on-line international papers to glean some real news, listened to poetry being read up the yin-yang, given money to MoveOn - and it still hasn't made a damn bit of difference. [MORE]

City Beat
FOR PARKS AND VILLARAIGOSA, VICTORY IS SWEET
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, March 4, 2003 -- Voters in Los Angeles tonight elected two men whose stories, although very different, converged in both ruin and redemption. They may diverge from here on in, though; political gadfly Melrose Larry Green joked that their presence on the council will make it "a better show than anything in Las Vegas." [MORE]

Ink Soup
LOW DOWN: A FABLE SANS MORAL
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash.-- Low is dead. Bereft of this word, the world of advertising is, for once, at a loss for words. There is a scramble to find an alternative to "shocked disbelief." [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
'SHAKE THE HAND THAT SHOOK THE HAND...'
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- The title of this coluimn is taken from a 1942 movie called "Gentleman Jim," starring Errol Flynn as world heavyweight champion James Corbett. He knocked out John L. Sullivan, a champ and world-renowned celebrity who held the title for over a decade, from 1882 to 1892, and was the last of the bare-knuckled fighters. [MORE]

Caring
PLIGHT OF THE ELDERLY IN A THROW AWAY WORLD
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I just sat through several hours of committee meetings where I was presenting our new model of community elder care to the county planning group for funding. There were proposals for skate parks and for trees and for new alleys. There were checks handed out: tens of thousands of dollars for basketball courts, new roads, and libraries and more. [MORE]

City Beat
C.R.A. ASKS $50,000 TO MEND 'CONFLICT OF INTEREST' IN HOUSING JAM
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 28, 2003 -- Less than 10 hours after The American Reporter revealed that desperately needed new low-income senior housing in Hollywood remains vacant months after it was fully rented and ready for elderly tenants, the Los Angeles City Council quietly sent a CRA request for $50,000 to pay a famously expensive Hollywood law firm after it learned of "a potential conflict of interest" in yet another low-income housing portion of controversial redevelopment projects at Hollywood Blvd. and Western Ave. [MORE]

On Native Ground
10 THINGS MORE LIKELY TO KILL YOU THAN TERRORISM
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - Now that the nation is back at Code Yellow, do you feel safer yet? [MORE]

Make My Day
WHAT WOULD A SNOW MICHAEL JACKSON LOOK LIKE?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Let's face it. Some people have an overinflated sense of Righteous Indignation, and treat every inconvenience in life at the same level. Whether someone tried to run them off the road, or the supermarket is out of their favorite brand of salad dressing, the Righteously Indignant people will respond as if someone has just put a flaming bag of dog poo on the coffee table without a coaster. [MORE]

City Beat
NEW SENIOR HOUSING SITS EMPTY AS OWNERS ARGUE OVER 'AIR RIGHTS'
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 28, 2003 -- How can it be? In a low-income community where rents are soaring, some seniors are homeless and many are suffering rent increases that strain their fixed-income budgets to the breaking point, 100 brand-new low-income apartments built expressly for them - and 12 years in the making - remain completely vacant months after they were rented and ready. [MORE]

Media Beat
NEWSWEEK STORY ON IRAQI WEAPONS NEEDS ANOTHER LOOK
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- You gotta hand it to America's mass media: When war hangs in the balance, they sure know how to bury a story. [MORE]

Momentum
PLEASE, JUST GET USED TO IT
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In December, a New York Post gossip columnist ran a "blind item" (no names) about a retired baseball legend who cooperated with his biographer when the writer promised not to reveal his homosexuality. [MORE]

City Beat
LACK OF HOTEL COULD CLOSE CONVENTION CENTER, ANSCHUTZ WARNS
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, February 26, 2003 -- Mention the news that broke yesterday about the arrests of four high-ranking executives of Denver-based billionaire Philip Anschutz's Qwest communications empire, and his Los Angeles-based representative at the Staples Center cringes. [MORE]

Ink Soup
THE BUS OF TIME
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. --Each time I walk through the dining room, my eyes caress briefly the beloved image of my "black grandmother," Corrie Scott, in an oil portrait that I painted as an adolescent. My grandmother in all but biological fact, she was an orphan left to the care of my grandfather by her dying mother and raised almost as a daughter in his family. [MORE]

Caring
IT TAKES A VILLAGE TO PREVENT ELDER ABUSE
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO --- We were out on the deck of the mountain cabin having wine and talking out of earshot of her father. His daughter was telling me of the woman who had swooped in on him after her mother's death two years previously. In those two years, this woman had systematically taken control and isolated him from his three daughters. [MORE]

Essay
AN APOCALYPSE IS JUST WHAT THIS SINFUL OLD WORLD NEEDS
by Lionel Rolfe

LOS ANGELES -- I don't like to hang out in large crowds, but there I was on a recent Saturday, one of some 75,000 or so people who marched along Hollywood Boulevard in a spirited effort to tell Mr. Bush that we don't want his stinking war. [MORE]

On Native Ground
FRIENDS DON'T LET FRIENDS START UNNECESSARY WARS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's been amusing watching the pro-war crowd get worked up over what the New York Post dubbed "the axis of weasel." [MORE]

City Beat
AS WAR RESOLUTION PASSES, PACHECO PORTRAYED AS HERO AND VILLAIN
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, February 21, 2003 -- With a hotly-contested antiwar resolution making its final apearance on the council floor and Los Angeles ready to become the nation's largest city to endorse it, East Los Angeles City Councilman Nick Pacheco stood up to cast the critical eighth and deciding vote - even as he was being vilified on the front page of a Los Angeles Times news section in a story implying he'd directed public money into his own down-to-the-wire reelection campaign. [MORE]

An A.R. Exclusive
AMERICA'S SECRET WAR IN IRAQ IS UNDERWAY
by Mark Scheinbaum

FORT BENNING, Ga., Feb. 20, 2001 -- A high ranking U.S. Army commander confirmed Wednesday that the same U.S. special operation teams which orchestrated CIa-Northern Alliance coalition efforts in Afghanistan are now inside Iraq and actively paving the way for expanded U.S. operations. He indicated that it was a part of the war on terror which could last four to six years to complete. [MORE]

Ink Soup
DEATH COMES FOR THE ARCH
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- Henry Martin has sent me a new book, a mystery set in the town where we both used to live, Princeton. It is a paperback with a cover containing words and a picture. [MORE]

Make My Day
WITH EDUCATION, EVERYONE'S A WINNER!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Cue the dueling banjos, it's the Battle Of The Valedictorians again! [MORE]

Travel: France
FRANCE NEVER LOOKED - OR TASTED - SO GOOD
by Adrian Maher

CHAMPAGNE/ARDENNES, France -- On previous trips to Paris, I've always yearned to venture outside its noise, crowds and high prices in search of the real France. [MORE]

Momentum
POETRY ON EARTH
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- "I would like to thank Mrs. Bush for being so thin-skinned," the writer Jamaica Kincaid said on a cold and clear Sunday afternoon in Manchester, Vt. "To think that a woman who lies down at night and has dinner across from a man who is the lord and master of weapons of mass destruction, and plans to use them, could not listen to the words of some poets who disagree with him!" [MORE]

City Beat
BATTLING OVER PEACE, L.A. COUNCIL SPLITS ON WAR RESOLUTION
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 18, 2003 -- What can you say about a peace resolution that died? [MORE]

Brasch Words
SIGNS OF OUR TIMES
by Rosemary and Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- On a frigid Saturday afternoon, about 150 people stood in front of a 150-year-old brick courthouse in rural Bloomsburg, Pa., and called for an end to George W. Bush's impending war. [MORE]

Market Mover
HAS IRAQ II BEEN HISTORY'S BEST HEAD FAKE?
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- The coments below are ones I sent to a longtime friend in the investment business, who had asked my candid opinion about an imminent war against Iraq. [MORE]

Caring
THELMA AND THE SEA BIRDS
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Fred and I headed down the hill to the coast mid-morning and got breakfast on the way. The Original Grand Slam was cheaper than Senior Meal Deals, so we both got 'em. Then down through San Pasqual Valley to the 78. It was a gorgeous Sunday. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
A WIND FROM THE NORTH
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When I hear the weatherman's voiceover, commenting on the oranges, blues, yellows and greens sweeping across a map of the United States, I stay focused on the Georgia coast, just above where it curves into the peninsula that is Florida. If I hear the words "a wind from the North ..." I pull my sweater closer around me and shudder a little. [MORE]

On Native Ground
HOW THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION GETS AWAY WITH IT
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- My editor forwarded me this e-mail from a 15-year-old girl in Georgia. Her name is Karoline and this is what she had to say: [MORE]

Momentum
VALENTINE TO A SMALL TOWN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- At the drive-thru line at my local credit union the other day, I got a fresh daisy along with my receipt. [MORE]

SEN. KERRY'S CANCER SURGERY CALLED SUCCESS
American Reporter Staff

BALTIMORE, Feb. 12, 2003 -- Sen. John F. Kerry emerged from surgery for prostate cancer without incident this morning, and his doctor said he should be able to leave the hospital in a few days. [MORE]

Festival Review
THE STATE OF CINEMA
Gary Gach

SAN FRANCISCO, April 10, 2003 -- North America's longest-running film festival returns for a 46th season, April 17 - May 1. Among the 200 films shown at this year's San Francisco International Film Festival (SFIFF), many are receiving prestigious prizes. [MORE]

City Beat
LOS ANGELES MAY TAKE STAND ON IRAQ WAR - OR MAY NOT
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 12, 2002 -- The City of Los Angeles on Thursday may become the largest municipality in the nation to take a formal position on a possible war with Iraq - and the issue has already sharply divided normally like-minded members of its City Council. [MORE]

Ink Soup
ABOARD THE BENTHIC, A BOTTOM LINE
by Clarence Brown

ABOARD THE SS BENTHIC -- The first thing I did, shortly after locating my quarters on this cruise ship, was to endear myself to the captain by asking whether he knew that the name of his vessel referred to the bottom of the sea? From Greek benthos? [MORE]

Market Mover
POETS SNUB WHITE HOUSE INVITATION
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Feb. 12, 2003 -- It all started with First Lady Laura Bush inviting a poet to the White House for a literary symposium in celebration of the life and times of Emily Dickinson. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
TIME OUT FOR LOVE
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This time of year, I usually write about St. Valentine -- just in case there's someone out there who doesn't know the man behind the legend. Instead of telling the age old tale I grew up with, I decided to check early Church records looking for a new slant. [MORE]

AS MARINE EXPEDITIONARY BRIGADE SAILS TO GULF, WAR GROWS MORE LIKELY
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 9, 2003 -- Barring an unforeseen, last-minute eruption of peace, the United States may be at war with Iraq within weeks. [MORE]

Caring
SONGS AND PROVERBS FOR THE JOURNEY
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- "Around and around and around she goes, and whar she stops nobody knows." My grandfather used to say that. And when he really liked something he'd say, "It's the cat's meow." Funny that those simple and often silly one liners are what I remember about him the most.= [MORE]

On Native Ground

SELLING A WAR THAT FEW ARE BUYING

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Did Secretary of State Colin Powell's presentation to the United Nations Security Council on Feb. 5 convince you that Saddam Hussein poses such a grave threat to world peace that we must go to war with him as soon as possible? [MORE]

City Beat
COUNCIL BATTLES TIME AND SPACE IN L.A. HOUSING CRISIS
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 6, 2003 -- "This is a great day," said Councilwoman Wendy Greuel Thursday afternoon as she welcomed about 45 of the city's most influential housing policy wonks to a special session of her Housing & Economic Development Committee called to celebrate progress in building the largest municipal housing trust fund in the nation. [MORE]

Media Beat
COLIN POWELL IS FLAWLESS (NOT)
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- There's no doubt about it: Colin Powell is a great performer, as he showed yet again at the U.N. Security Council the other day. On television, he exudes confidence and authoritative judgment. [MORE]

Make My Day
GIMME AN 'A' ... OR ELSE!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- The American Legal System: We don't make the grade. We make the grade better. At least that's what one Memphis, Michigan high school senior thinks. [MORE]

Momentum
ON A BEAUTIFUL PLANET, SUCH TERRIBLE THINGS
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In the week following the destruction of the space shuttle Columbia, the most enduring image was not the comet-like trail burning white across the blue Texas sky, or the charred helmet resting in the piney woods. It was the NASA footage of Col. Ilan Ramon, the handsome Israeli fighter pilot, floating out of a tunnel into a room full of weightlessness, his arms spread like a bird in flight and an expression of transcendental happiness upon his face. [MORE]

On Trial
MERCEDES-BENZ CLEARED IN HEATER CORE BURN CASE
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 5, 2003 -- Hours after a trio of plaintiffs in Phoenix settled similar cases with a different German automaker, a jury headed by Los Angeles City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo voted overwhelmingly Wednesday to find that Mercedes-Benz was not negligent in the design and sale of cars containing heater core end caps that can explode and burn drivers, and awarded the Los Angeles plaintiff nothing. [MORE]

City Beat
L.A.'S FALSE ALARM BATTLE ENDS IN VICTORY FOR BRATTON
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- It was a battle royal from the beginning, but new Los Angeles Police Chief Bill Bratton has come off the battlefield nearly unbloodied and clutching a big war trophy - hundreds of police officers and hundreds of thousands of man-hours he freed from chasing a huge number of false alarms across a frightened city whose crime rate has soared in recent months. [MORE]

AR At Sundance
"The Art of the Documentary"

AR At Sundance
EMMETT TILL RISES AGAIN TO INDICT HIS TIMES

by Adrian Maher

PARK CITY, Utah -- Many Americans believe the seminal event of the civil rights movement was Rosa Parks' refusal to give up her bus seat in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955. Her actions and subsequent arrest ignited a massive black boycott of the city's bus system and sparked the emergence of a local preacher - the Reverend Martin Luther King - as a leader in a revolution that changed history. [MORE]

AR at Sundance
THE ILLUMINATED EDUCATION OF GORE VIDAL
by Adrian Maher

PARK CITY, Utah -- As a dramatist, novelist, actor, social satirist, public debater and troublemaker extraordinaire, Gore Vidal, for the past 50 years has skewered those in power with outrageous monologues and America's sharpest pen. He is a national literary treasure whose witty barbs and deeply researched and reflective historical novels have shed light on politics, sex, art and philosophy. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
TEAR DOWN THIS WALL - OF STUPIDITY!
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Most of us can mark our lives by events powerful enough to stop us right where stand. We can not go back and going forward is no longer predictable as it was just moments before. [MORE]

The Pooh Papers
DISNEY MOVES TO END POOH CASE, CHARGES MISCONDUCT
by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 3, 2003 -- The Walt Disney Co. today asked a Superior Court Judge to hear evidence that Stephen Slesinger Inc.'s attorneys and principals stole documents, defied court orders, destroyed evidence and engaged in a pattern of "pervasive misconduct and illegal activities" as they sought royalty payments that are allegedly overdue during an 11-year battle with the studio, Disney's vice-president for corporate communications said Monday. [MORE]

On Trial
MERCEDES HEATER CORE CASE AVERTS MISTRIAL, GOES TO JURY
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 3, 2003 -- A closely-watched trial over automakers' responsibility for exploding heater parts that have injured scores of people in Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Volkswagen vehicles went to a Superior Court jury in Los Angeles this afternoon after a motion for a mistrial based on the discovery of an American Reporter article in the jury room was denied by Judge Emilie Elias. [MORE]

Brasch Words
TRAGIC INEQUALITIES
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- It happened so quickly - America gained heroes and lost bright, inquisitive, patriotic men and women. Family members in just an instant plummeted from anticipation to agony. Spouses and children now planned memorial services. America lost 11 souls. [MORE]

Caring
DELIVER US FROM THE OMINOUS
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Six feet tall and impending doom. What would it be like to live with that every day? I wondered that as I sat with my elder friend today. Her husband is loosing touch mentally. [MORE]

+ In Memoriam +
The Brave Crew of STS-107
"May They Guide Our Ships"

A SONNET FOR THE SHUTTLE CREW

by Joe Shea

HOUSTON, Feb. 1, 2003 -- The space shuttle Columbia was lost at approximately 8:58 a.m. EST this morning in a catastrophic explosion over Texas, possibly caused by damage to heat tiles on the left wing, which was struck by hardened foam blown off the booster tank at the time it separated from the shuttle shortly after takeoff from Cape Canaveral 16 days ago. [MORE]

Media Beat
WAITING FOR THE LORD IN DOWNTOWN BAGHDAD
by Norman Solomon

BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Picture yourself as an American reporter here in the Iraqi capital. [MORE]

On Native Ground
SEARCHING FOR TRUTH ABOUT THIS WAR
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Sam Smith, editor of The Progressive Review (prorev.com), recently offered what he called the "Standardized Conflagration Competency Exam." [MORE]

Make My Day
WOULD RUM WORK INSTEAD?
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Abracadabra, make my common sense ... disappear! If only it were as easy as waving a magic wand. [MORE]

AFTER 7 YEARS OF WAR, CEASEFIRE COMES TO BLOODIED NEPAL
by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Jan. 30, 2003 -- A ceasefire has been declared between government troops and Maoist rebels here to allow talks that might end seven years of insurgency that has claimed thousands of lives and bloodied the international image of this Himalayan kingdom. [MORE]

Reporting: Brazil
WORLD'S ACTIVISTS SEND A MESSAGE TO THE ECONOMIC ELITE
by Larry Bridwell

PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil -- "We need a new world economic order that distributes wealth more fairly so that impoverished countries have a chance of becoming less impoverished, so that African babies have the same right to eat as a blond, blue-eyed baby born in Scandinavia," Brazil's President Lula da Silva told tens of thousands of participants at the World Social Forum meeting in this southern port city last week. [MORE]

Momentum
THE WAR AGAINST WOMEN
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Watching President George W. Bush give his State of the Union speech Tuesday night, I thought about snakes. [MORE]

On Trial
FOR TRIAL LAWYERS, MERCEDES-BENZ HEATER CORE CASE IS RED HOT
by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Jan. 29, 2002 -- One of the nation's most successful trial lawyers on Wednesday challenged an expert witness for Mercedes-Benz U.S.A as a closely watched trial on the automaker's liability for an exploding heater core that badly burned real estate salesman Albert Royas drew to a close before Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Emilie Elias and a jury that includes Los Angeles City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo, the city's top lawyer. [MORE]

Ink Soup
SARDINE, HAT, GLOBE...
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Why I associate it with London I am not sure. Perhaps it was because we were living in London in the late Sixties, early Seventies, and I seem to recall an article, probably in the TLS, in which someone argued that the design of Shakespeare's Globe Theater showed the influence of an ancient technique for remembering a complicated series of things, such as all the points and the subpoints in one of Cicero's orations. [MORE]

Editorial
POISED TO TRIUMPH
by Joe Shea

President George W. Bush came into his own last night in a powerful State of the Union address that made a strong case against Saddam Hussein and a great case for compassionate conservatism. In particular, the President's extensive and compelling comments about the spread of AIDS in Africa and the lack of drugs and resources to treat its victims far outstrips any plan the Democrats have offered to fight it; he adopted the orphans of this terrible scourge into the American agenda in a way that will shape the world's efforts against AIDS for another century. [MORE]

Caring
WOMEN TURN TO WOMEN FOR 'COMPASSIONATE CAPITALISM'
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- It is no secret that current economic conditions have made the single-income family one of many dwindling species in 21st Century. Much has been written about the impact of this massive shift, especially on children as women have migrated from home to workplace, but the cultural price this change has exacted from our elders is just beginning to become clear. [MORE]

An AR Special Report
On Native Ground: WHY ARE WE STILL ARGUING ABOUT AFFIRMATIVE ACTION?
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I was surprised to see that President Bush would take time out from the "war on terror" to denounce affirmative action. I was even more surprised that President Bush and his handlers picked Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s birthday to launch his attack. [MORE]

New Media
QUALCOMM FUMBLES AT 'SUPER TECHNOLOGY BOWL'
by Joe Shea

TORREY PINES, Calif., Jan. 23, 2003 -- On the eve of the Super Bowl at Qualcomm Stadium, here along the lush green links of the Torrey Pines Golf Club in the faux Greene & Greene grand luxe of The Lodge at Torrey Pines, Qualcomm founder and CEO Dr. Irwin Jacobs rolled out his executive front line for a bank of high-tech reporters who mostly asked questions replete with a bewildering array of the abbreviations that define the ailing wireless industry, in which Qualcomm, with its chips in 135 million cell phones, is the dominant player. On Thursday, though, Qualcomm fumbled. [MORE]

Momentum: FAST FOOD FASCISM
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- McDonald's is under attack these days, but for all the wrong reasons. Yes, the fast food industry sells unhealthy food. Yes, it induces people to overeat for profit. Yes, ranchers cut down rain forests to supply it with cattle. Yes, that reduces the world's oxygen supply. But the real crime of McDonald's - supposedly the shinning symbol of American capitalism - is that it is truly and deeply anti-American. [MORE]

Media Beat MEMO: WHEN WAR IS A RUSH
by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- To: Washington's most powerful people. [MORE]

An AR Special Report
The Language of War

AR Special Report
Ink Soup: O, SELL ME A HOME

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- How the Pentagon ever managed to be tagged with such a neutral, geometric name beats me. When I was in the tenth grade, it did not even exist. I was in college before it was finished, and by then I knew enough Greek to understand that it meant "five angles." [MORE]

AR Special Report
ORWELL'S VISION IS STILL ALIVE IN 2003
by Doug Lasken

LOS ANGELES -- Animal Farm, George Orwell's nightmare vision of totalitarianism, became a best seller after World War II when the Cold War began. It has been taught in middle and high schools ever since as an allegory of the Russian Revolution, serving nicely to vilify our erstwhile nemesis, the Soviet Union. [MORE]

Caring
WHO WILL BE THERE WHEN WE ARE CHILDREN AGAIN?
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I have always felt that caregivers are the most important people in senior care - not the nurses, not the doctors, but the people who actually give the hands-on care, day in and day out. [MORE]

Reporting: Politics
SECRECY SURROUNDS A BUSH BROTHER'S ROLE IN 9/11
by Margie Burns

WASHINGTON, Jan 19, 2003 -- A company that provided security at New York City's World Trade Center, Dulles International Airport in Washington, D.C., and to United Airlines between 1995 and 2001 was backed by a private Kuwaiti-American investment firm with ties to a brother of President Bush and the Bush family, according to records obtained by the American Reporter. [MORE]

Reporting: Indonesia
INDONESIAN MUSLIMS HEAR A PLEA FOR PEACE
by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA -- A leading Muslim scholar from the Sudan has injected some high-octane political thinking into the furious debate going on here over the possible imposition of Islamic law, or sharia, saying that the concept is incompatible with democracy and the principles of modern statehood. [MORE]

Brasch Words
HOW FAR WILL BUSH PUSH THE COURTS?
by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa., Jan. 17, 2003 -- The Supreme Court received advice from constitutional scholar, civil rights analyst, national educator and President George W. Bush. Yes, that President Bush. [MORE]

On Native Ground
'CORPORATE CREEP' IS CATCHING UP TO NEWSPAPERS
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I've long read newspapers back to front, starting with the sports section. Lately, it's the only part of the newspaper I can stand to read. That's because the front of the newspaper is full of lies and B.S. The sports section is not. [MORE]

Momentum
ANNE DRINKARD-MOSS: SINGING FOR THE LORD
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A murmur ran through the choir when the bus pulled into Brattleboro, Vt. "Everybody's white here. What're we going to do?" Then someone said, "We're going to sing to the Lord," and that's exactly what they did. [MORE]

Caring
WHO WILL BE THERE WHEN WE BECOME CHILDREN AGAIN?
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- I have always felt that caregivers are the most important people in senior care - not the nurses, not the doctors, but the people who actually give the hands-on care, day in and day out. [MORE]

Ink Soup: UH-OH
by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- Okay, I admit it: I'm afraid. I know: Cowards die many times before their deaths; The valiant never taste of death but once, and so on... . [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
WHEN KNOWLEDGE IS NO LONGER POWER
by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It's not as if I were born yesterday; I've been around through every technical innovation since the dial telephone. Since then, I've always had the ability to dial a number and reach my party any place in the world. If my telephone were not functioning for some reason or other, I could use a neighbor's, a service station's, a public phone booth, and be as aware of the system as I was at home. [MORE]

On Native Ground
BEST ECONOMIC STIMULUS PLAN? NO WAR WITH IRAQ
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President Bush thinks he can rouse the stagnant U.S. economy by eliminating federal taxes on stock dividends. [MORE]

Make My Day
I'LL HAVE WHAT SHE'S HAVING
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- I've sometimes considered being a restaurant critic, but except for the restaurant that delivers shish kebabs William Tell style, there aren't many I don't like. [MORE]

Market Mover
EARTH TO BUSH: IT'S CAPITAL GAINS, NOT DIVIDENDS
by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla. -- President Bush's proposal to cut or eliminate taxation on common stock dividends is a positive move toward overall tax reform. Yet, it pales in comparison for the need for a genuine, significant reduction - or elimination - of the tax on capital gains. [MORE]

Momentum
WORDS CAN HARM, WORDS CAN KILL
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- News that the American Dialect Society named "weapons of mass destruction" as its "word of the year" came not a moment too soon. [MORE]

Hominy & Hash
AN EASY RIDE TO A RUDE AWAKENING
Constance Daley

PHOENIX, Ariz. -- On Dec. 20, the feature on National Public Radio's Weekend Edition "All Things Considered" was called a Race Roundtable. NPR brought together in their studios a relatively small group of people from the Historical Society of Washington, D.C., to discuss former Senate Majority Leader Lott's remarks and to ask where America goes from here. Historically, the nation's capital has been the site of race controversy from the beginning - and still is today. [MORE]

Caring
SURVIVING IN THE ANZA-BORREGO
by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- The thing about rural nursing is that you never know where the road will take you. It could lead to an old shack without electricity or a mobile home on a reservation, or it could lead to a mansion and everything in-between. [MORE]

On Native Ground
THE REAL 'LUCKY DUCKIES'
by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's hard to say what's more absurd - that The Wall Street Journal's editorial page would call someone who earns under $12,000 a year a "lucky ducky," or that the Journal would use the phrase "lucky duckies" in an editorial. [MORE]

Make My Day
STOP LOOKING AT ME!
by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Say what you will about them, the Chicago Cubs have always been a perennial baseball favorite. Maybe it's because they haven't won the World Series since 1908. Maybe it's because whenever anyone says "tradition," they point to the Cubs. Maybe it's because everyone loves an underdog, and the Cubs are about as underdoggy as you're going to get. [MORE]

Momentum
MY PERFECT DIVORCE
by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Many people get a new family through marriage; I got one through a divorce. [MORE]

Copyright 2008 Joe Shea The American Reporter. All Rights Reserved.

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