Vol. 20, No. 4,941W - The American Reporter - March 23, 2014




by Heather Buchman
AR Correspondent
State College, Pa.
July 15, 2011
The Weatherman
IN TEXAS DROUGHT, CATTLE DIE OF TOO MUCH WATER

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BLOOMSBURG, Pa. -- After significant compromise with the recalcitrant Republicans who want to continue to give tax advantages to the wealthy while cutting significant social programs, President Obama has finally taken a stand on debt ceiling negotiations. However, in labor, wildlife management, and the environment he is still compromising rather than coming out forcefully for principles he and the working class believe.

The Republican presidential candidates have torn into the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) for a recent decision supporting organized labor. Mitt Romney claimed President Obama packed the NLRB with "union stooges." Newt Gingrich wants Congress to remove all NLRB funds and President Obama to stop the NLRB actions. Tim Pawlenty called the decision "preposterous."

Sen. Jim DeMint (R-S.C.), who isn't a presidential candidate but is strongly anti-union, declared the decision "is nothing more than a political favor for the unions who are supporting President Obama's re-election campaign." Other Republican senators have claimed they will block the nomination of NLRB acting general counsel Lafe Solomon to a permanent post.

At issue is an NLRB decision that Boeing violated federal law by trying to stop a production line in its Seattle-area plant that manufactures the Boeing 787 Dreamliner and opening a new facility in South Carolina, an anti-union "right-to-work" state. The NLRB agreed with a complaint filed by the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers (IAM) that Boeing's decisions was retaliation for the actions of the Seattle workers. In both public and internal memos, Boeing stated it didn't wish to deal with unionized workers in Seattle. The NLRB suit is currently in federal court.

At a recent press conference, President Obama sidestepped support for either the NLRB or the unions by claiming, "I don't know all the facts," and that he didn't wish to interfere in the process. However, he did state that corporations "need to have the freedom to relocate ... and if they're choosing to relocate here in the United States, that's a good thing."

When Sen. Barack Obama was campaigning for the presidency, he promised to support the working class. If there was a picket line, or if the workers were being threatened, he promised to "put on a comfortable pair of shoes" and walk side by side with them.

That has not happened. He never spoke out in defense of the workers in Seattle during their two-year fight against Boeing, nor after they filed their complaint in April. Nor has the President given support to the millions of citizens in several states where conservative governors and legislatures have launched campaigns to break unions, while giving special benefits to the business and executive classes.

Giving Mr. Obama the widest possible excuse, perhaps the Secret Service declared it would be dangerous for a president to be in a crowd of protestors, no matter how peaceful it is.

But there is no excuse for President Obama's weak record on environmental and wildlife protection, something he placed high on his list as a candidate, but failed to defend as President.

Strong words as a candidate turned to "compromise" and then near-abandonment when confronted by extremists who refuse to read or understand any of thousands of studies about the effects of global warming.

To please the oil lobby, the same one that dominated the previous Administration, President Obama approved deep-water drilling - just weeks before the BP oil disaster in the Gulf coast. Then, months after the disaster, he approved continued deep-water drilling.

His wildlife management policies, while based on good intentions, are not something he has rolled up his sleeves to fight for.

Confronted by the cattle industry lobby, which believes 10,000 wild horses and burros are threats to the existence of more than 92 million cattle, President Obama has virtually abandoned protection of the few wild horses and burros left in the country.

And now his Department of the Interior is about to allow Wyoming to begin the wanton killing of gray wolves, including pups in dens, outside of Yellowstone National Park.

The plan yields to extremists who see wolves as threats to cattle. Yet numerous research studies show that wolves seldom attack cattle, and, when they do, the government pays the rancher - even if the steer is new born or headed to a slaughterhouse the next day. The cattle industry is as dominant in American politics as is the NRA.

And that leaves hunters. Wolves cull the weakest animals from the herd. That's the problem. There are only 5,000 wolves in the continental United States, but a few million hunters see the wolf as competitors for 20 million deer, 250,000 moose, or any animal that can be killed and then mounted as a trophy in someone's den.

Although the mean-spirited and uncompromising vindictiveness of the ultra-right has blocked much progress, it is the President's own actions in labor, environment, and wildlife that have deteriorated into compromise and retreat. His inability to defend the principles he believes and campaigned for threatens any chance he will be remembered as a great President.

Senior Correspondent Walter Brasch is an award-winning syndicated social issues journalist. His current book, Before the First Snow, looks at an energy company that lures citizen consent because of jobs in a depressed economy, but which may threaten health, safety, and environment.

Copyright 2014 Joe Shea The American Reporter. All Rights Reserved.

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