Vol. 20, No. 5,046 - The American Reporter - September 1, 2014




by Randolph T. Holhut
American Reporter
Correspondent
Dummerston, Vt.
December 15, 2011
On Native Ground
FROM DEMOCRACY TO OLIGARCHY

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HARRISBURG, Pa., Dec. 13, 2011 -- If the first-year gross anatomy class at the Penn State's Hershey Medical School needs spare body parts to study, they can visit the cloakroom of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. That's where most of the legislators left their spines.

The House voted 124-69 on Dec. 13 to send an animal welfare bill back to committee, in this case the Gaming Oversight Committee. The bill, SB 71, would have banned simulcasting of greyhound races from other states.

Pennsylvania had banned greyhound racing in 2004. Among several of the current bill's amendments were ones that would also have banned the sale of cat and dog meat, increased penalties for releasing exotic animals, and stopped the cruelty of live pigeon shoots.

It's the pigeon shoot amendment, sponsored by Rep. John Maher (R-Allegheny), that caused legislators to hide beneath their desks, apparently in fear of the poop from the NRA, which lobbied extensively against ending pigeon shoots. The unrelenting NRA message irrationally claimed that banning pigeon shoots is the first step to banning guns.

The NRA even called the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) a radical animal rights group. The House action leaves Pennsylvania as the only state where pretend hunters, most of them from New Jersey and surrounding states where pigeon shoots are illegal, to come to Pennsylvania and kill caged birds launched in front of spectators and the shooters.

Most pigeon shoots are held in Berks County in southeastern Pennsylvania, with one in the nearby suburban Philadelphia area. Scared and undernourished birds are placed into small cages, and then released about 20 yards in front of people with 12-gauge shotguns.

Most birds, as many as 5,000 at an all-day shoot, are hit standing on their cages, on the ground, or flying erratically just a few feet from the people who pretend to be sportsmen. Even standing only feet from their kill, the shooters aren't as good as they think they are.

About 70 percent of all birds are wounded, according to Heidi Prescott, HSUS senior vice-president, who for about 25 years has been documenting and leading the effort to pass legislation to finally end pigeon shoots in the state.

Birds that fall outside the shooting club's property are left to die what can be long and horrible deaths. If the birds are wounded on the killing fields, trapper boys and girls, most in their early teens, some of them younger, grab the birds, wring their necks, stomp on their bodies, or throw them live into barrels to suffocate. There is no food or commercial value of a pigeon killed at one of the shoots.

The lure of pigeon shoots, in addition to what the participants must think is a wanton sense of fulfillment, is gambling, illegal under Pennsylvania law but not enforced by the Pennsylvania State Police.

The International Olympic Committee banned the so-called sport after the 1900 Olympics because of its cruelty to animals. Most hunters, as well as the Pennsylvania Game Commission, say that pigeon shoots aren't "fair chase hunting." Almost every daily newspaper in the state and dozens of organizations, from the Council of Churches to the Pennsylvania Bar Association, oppose this form of animal cruelty.

On the floor of the statehouse, Rep. Rosita C. Youngblood (D-Philadelphia), usually a supporter of animal rights issues, spoke out against voting on the bill, and asked other Democrats to go along with her. Youngblood is minority chair of the Gaming Oversight committee.

Youngblood's chief of staff, Bill Thomas, emphasizes that Youngblood's only concern was to protect the integrity of the legislative process. Although some members truly believed they voted to recommit the bill for procedural reasons, most members were just simply afraid to vote on the bill. Voting to recommit the bill were 52 Democrats, many of them opposed to pigeon shoots; 35 voted to keep it on the floor for debate.

Among Republicans, the vote was 72-34 to send the bill to committee.

The Arguments

Germaneness: - The Republican leadership had determined that all amendments to bills in the current legislative session must be germane to the bill.

"You can't hijack a bill," many in the House, including key Democrats, claimed as the major reason they voted against SB71.

However, the Republicans, who hold a majority in the Pennsyvania House and are able to block any bill in committee that didn't meet their strict political agenda, raised "germaneness" to a level never before seen in the House.

For decades, Democrats and Republicans attached completely unrelated amendments to bills. Even during this session, the Republicans, in violation of their own "rules," attached amendments to allow school vouchers onto several bills, many that had nothing to do with education.

But the Greyhound racing bill was considered "germane" under both gambling and animal cruelty concerns. Thus, the amendment to ban pigeon shoots could also be considered to be an animal cruelty amendment and not subject to the Judiciary Committee, where it was likely to die.

Separate bill: - Several legislators believed the attempt to stop pigeon shoots should have been its own bill, not tacked onto another bill.

However, only twice have bills about pigeon shoots come to the floor of the Pa. House. Most proposed legislation had been buried in committees or blocked by House leadership, both Democrat and Republican - most of whom received support and funding from the NRA, gun owner groups, and their political action committees (PACs).

In 1989, the Pennsylvania House had defeated a bill to ban pigeon shoots, 66-126. By 1994, three years after the first large scale protest, the House voted 99-93 in favor of an amendment to ban pigeon shoots, but fell short of the 102 votes needed for passage.

The bill would duplicate or repeal a recently-signed law: - Rep. Curt Schroeder (R-Chester Co.), chair of the Gaming Oversight committee, sponsored the House version of the Senate's bill.

If it was truly an unnecessary bill, he or the leadership could have previously sent it to committee for reworking or killed it. According to sources close to the leadership, despite his concern for animal welfare, Schroeder was not pleased about the amendments tacked onto his bill.

Short time to accomplish: - Several Democrats believed that by spending extraordinary time on the bill, necessary legislation would not be brought to the floor and the Republicans could then blame the Democrats for blocking key legislation.

However, both parties already knew how they would vote for redistricting (the Republicans had gerrymandered the state to protect certain districts), school vouchers, and other proposed legislation.

Further, the Republican leadership could have blocked putting the greyhound bill into the agenda or placed it at the end of other bills.

Even on the floor of the House, the leadership could have shut down debate at any time. Thus, the Democrats' argument about "only four days left" is blunted by the Republicans' own actions. During 2011, the House had met only 54 days when the vote on SB 71 was taken.

If the House was so concerned about having only four days left in the year to discuss and vote upon critical issues, it could have added days to the work week or increased hours while in session.

Speaker Mike Turzai (R-Allegheny), to his credit, wanted a vote, although he personally opposed the pigeon shoot amendment. "Let's put this issue to rest," he told the members. Taking the time to debate the bill, says Bill Thomas, "wasted taxpayer money and time."

However, "the amount of time spent avoiding the bill," counters Prescott, "wastes far more time and resources than voting on it."

Nevertheless, no matter what the arguments, sending the bill to committee was a good way to avoid having to deal with a highly controversial issue. It allowed many legislators to pretend to their constituents that they still believe in animal welfare, while avoiding getting blow-back from the NRA or its supporters.

Conversely, it allowed many of those who wanted to keep pigeon shoots to avoid a debate and subsequent vote, allowing continued support from pro-gun constituents who accept the NRA non-logic, while not offending constituents who believe in animal welfare.

Whatever their reasons, the failure of many of the state's representatives to stand up for their convictions probably caused legislation to ban this form of animal cruelty to be as dead during this session as the pigeons whose slender necks are broken by teenagers.

They finish the pigein kill by people who think they are sportsmen, but are little more than juveniles disguised in the bodies of adults.

AR Senior Correspondent Walter Brasch is an award-winning syndicated columnist, a newspaper and magazine reporter and editor whose specialties included public affairs andinvestigative reporting. He is professor emeritus of journalism. The latest of Dr. Brasch's 18 books is a novel, Before the First Snow (www.greeleyandstone.com), a story of the counterculture set in rural Pennsylvania.

Copyright 2014 Joe Shea The American Reporter. All Rights Reserved.

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