A.R. ARCHIVED

Vol. 22, No. 5,514 - The American Reporter - September 7, 2016

Merry Christmas, Dr. Soup!

Ink Soup
A BOWL OF SOUP FOR BOXING DAY

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- One of the pleasures of the holiday season is that I get to meet all the staff of this column at our grand Christmas reunion here in the office atop the World Overhill Emeritus International Something Memorial Enterprise (WOEISME), an affiliate of the Mickey Mouse Foundation

Caring
LOVED TO 'THE VERY HAIRS OF YOUR HEAD'

by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- Despite his age, I think Santa must have a good head of hair. We all know he has a magnificent white beard, tumbling like cumulus clouds all over his jovial face and down on to his chest. I'm sure he never shaves. That would be blasphemy.

On Native Ground
LOOKING FOR HOPE IN A DARK TIME

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Decades rarely begin and end neatly with rounded numbers. The Thirties began with the stock market crash in Oct. 29, 1929 and didn't end until Pearl Harbor was bombed on Dec. 7, 1941. The Forties didn't end with Hiroshima, but lingered on through the "forgotten war" in Korea.

BOMB PLOT ON PARIS-TO-MIAMI JET FOILED BY PASSENGERS

American Reporter Staff

BOSTON, Dec. 22, 2001 -- American Airlines Paris-to-Miami Flight 63 narrowly avoided catastrophe today when a passenger attempted to light the fuse of a bomb hidden in the heels of his basketball sneakers but was stopped by an alert stewardess and then tackled and sedated by passengers aboard the transAtlantic flight.

Momentum: PANDORA'S CHRISTMAS GIFT

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- I have always loved Christmas, which may be asurprising admission for a Jewish woman to make.

On Native Ground
SAFETY IS AN ILLUSION

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - In the best of times, Americans are scaredy cats. They insist upon absolute safety and zero risk in everything they do. In the worst of times, as in post-Sept. 11, folks freak out even more.

Media Beat
ANNOUNCING THE P.U.-LITZER PRIZES FOR 2001

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- The P.U.-litzer Prizes were established a decade ago to give recognition to the stinkiest media performances of the year.

The Pooh Papers: JUDGE TO UNSEAL HUGE FILE IN POOH CASE

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 12. 2001 -- Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Ernest Hiroshige today moved to unseal tens of thousands of documents in a long-running case that has pitted the Walt Disney Co. against heirs to the U.S. rights to Winnie the Pooh in a dispute over hundreds of millions of dollars in alleged past-due and future royalties.

Caring
WINTER IN THE AGING SOUL

by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- According to research published recently in the Journal of American Medical Association, not only do physicians underprescribe for pain, 50 percent of nurses under-administer the pain medication does get ordered.

Ink Soup
PICNIC, LIGHTNING

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The Poet Laureate of the United States, Billy Collins, has published what very, very few poets, even those officially sanctioned by the Library of Congress, ever publish: a best-seller.

On Native Ground
THE REAL AMERICAN EMERGENCY

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There was a story in The Miami Herald the other day about how the federal government will likely accumulate deficits until at least fiscal year 2005.

Momentum
THE IMAGE MADE REAL

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The images came first on Sept. 11, one after the other, each more shocking than the last: smoke coming out of the first World Trade Center tower; the fireball just after the second plane went in;people tumbling from the sky; a blizzard of paper; gray people running; the impossible implosion of the buildings; the silent, enormous, brooding,steaming, twisted pile.

Hominy & Hash
I REMEMBER PEARL HARBOR

by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- I remember Pearl Harbor. That was the day I went from hopscotch to knitting needles. Yes, I once knit a scarf for the boys in Greenland. Oops! I'm not supposed to mention they're in Greenland.

Editorial
PEACE IS NOT AN OPTION

by Joe Shea

If bombings like those that took 26 innocent lives on Saturday and Sunday had occurred every day for the past 120 days in Israel, that nation would have lost the number of people the United States lost on a single day in September.

+ In Memoriam +
George Harrison
"Thanks For The Music"

Passings: George Harrison
ALL THINGS MUST PASS

by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO: My dear George: You are gone, and so now I can write you the love letter that I knew would never reach you.

On Native Ground
THE BATTLE BETWEEN 'JIHAD' AND 'McWORLD'

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There are many subtexts to our current "war on terrorism." But many of them lead back to the one thing that I have long maintained would be the defining struggle of our new century - how to counter the ever-increasing corporate control of our planet.

War On Terror
NEPAL JOINS WAR ON TERRORISM AFTER MAOIST ATTACKS

by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, Nov. 28, 2001 -- The government of Nepal has declared a state of emergency and ordered the mobilization of Nepalese Army following a series of violent attacks by ultra-leftist Maoist terrorists who broke a four-month-old cease-fire agreement with the country's rulers.

Momentum
AS THE WORLD SCREAMS

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Imagine that the earth itself is a living organism. T= he dirt and rock we walk on is only its thick protective skin, but its vuln= erable body lies deep inside. Imagine it's like a sea urchin, with a hard s= hell on the outside and a soft living coral center.

America At War
Editorial: BEYOND AFGHANISTAN

by Joe Shea

With the end of the Afghanistan stage of the War Against Terrorism now in sight, it behooves every American to try to look beyond the immediate fighting and help our nation determine where we go from here.

Hominy & Hash
GENERATION X REVEALED ITSELF ON SEPT. 11

by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- If I gave it any thought at all a few months ago, I would have thought the "X" in Generation X stood for an unknown quantity - I couldn't think of anything particularly noteworthy of the designated group as a whole, leaving aside the spectacular few.

Caring
HOLIDAY'S SHARP EDGES SEEM SOFTER NOW

by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- It is at the same time a profound and a silly thing, both theater of the absurd and nursery of things beautiful and tender. It can delight and elevate, irritate and exasperate all within the space of a few hours.

On Native Ground
LAND OF THE FREE? NOT UNDER USA PATRIOT ACT

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- While most Americans were busy hanging flags and fretting about anthrax, your elected representatives in Washington decidedto repeal a large chunk of the U.S. Constitution.

America At War
THE SWISS CONNECTION: BIOWEAPONS, MILITANTS AND MORE

by Lucy Komisar

GENEVA -- To protect America from terrorist attack, the United States must investigate illicit trade in biological weapons and trace the movement of terrorist money. A good starting point is a controversial Swiss bank that may have facilitated the sale of hazardous biological materials to Islamic militants.

Momentum
THE THANKSGIVING OF THE EMPTY CHAIR

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. - This is a strange Thanksgiving, my friends. It is the Thanksgiving of the empty chair.

Brasch Words
TWIN TOWERS FUND SLOW TO HELP TO VICTIMS, BUT DEADLINE FOR GIFTS IS MET

by Walter M. Brasch

BLOOMSBURG, Pa., Nov. 21, 2001 -- Almost two months after the Sept. 11 national tragedy, and sandwiched between two Congressional investigative hearings about how charities are distributing donations to victims and their families, New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani announced that the city-sponsored Twin Towers Fund will finally begin to release funds. The Twin Towers Fund had accumulated $85 million since Sept. 11, but had not provided assistance.

Ink Soup
CONRAD'S SECRET AGENT HAS MEANING TODAY

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, WASH. -- The other week I wrote in this space about Camus' novel "The Plague," a fiction with obvious relevance to our current fears of mass infection.

Hominy & Hash
WHO'S AFRAID OF ANTHRAX?

by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- It was a short drive to the Post Office, yet I wondered as I drove if this were just wasted motion. My husband had warned his sister about opening her mail, since it would go through the Brentwood Post Office to reach her Washington, D.C., apartment.

Make My Day
ULTIMATE FRISBEE IN UTRECHT: WHAT'S DUTCH FOR C.P.R.?

by Erik Deckers

UTRECHT, The Netherlands -- Those who know me know that one of my favorite pastimes is playing Ultimate Frisbee. In college, I was known to drop everything to play a couple of games, and could always be counted on to have a disc or two in my book bag.

Congratulations to Dr. Eduardo Luna!

Editorial
OUR SON, THE DOCTOR

by Joe Shea

NOVEMBER 15, 2001 -- "Our son, the doctor": I can say that now, albeit with a bit of a hitch in my step, because Dr. Eduardo Luna is my stepson by my lovely wife, Mireya. Just the same, I am so proud today I could bust.

The American Way
HOW ABOUT THE WAR AGAINST KIDS?

by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., Nov. 14, 2001 -- My guess is I'm not alone in feeling that swirling sentiments of war, anger, and sadness have turned my ethical and moral compass into a Cuisinart of mush. I look at the tangled, soggy mess and identify and retrieve only the chunks I like.

America At War
KABUL FALLS TO NORTHERN ALLIANCE AS TALIBAN FLEE

by Joe Shea

NOVEMBER 13, 2001 -- Afghanistan's capital city of Kabul fell to the forces of the Northern Alliance, America's allies in the wear against terrorism there, as Taliban troops pounded for days by American bombing runs abandoned their posts Monday and fled south towards Kandahar.

AMERICAN AIRLINES JET CRASHES IN NEW YORK, KILLING 265

American Reporter Staff

NOVEMBER 13, 2001 -- An Airbus A-300 widebody passenger jet broke apart in mid-air shortly after takeoff Monday en route to the Dominican Republic and slammed into the small residential community of Far Rockaways in the borough of Queens, an area of New York City already devastated by the loss of some 750 residents in the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

Caring
BLESSED ARE THE LOST

by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- A large percentage of the elderly are afflicted with it, but what exactly is dementia?

The American Way
ON VETERANS' DAY, AN OLD VET HAS ADVICE ON NEW WAR

by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., Nov. 11, 2001 -- God willing, or at least if He remembers Normandy, my Dad will celebrate another Veterans' Day. Nowadays as the Parkinson's continues its capricious attack, words come in short, breathless spurts. Sentences are as tough to get as pouring frozen honey from a thimble.

On Native Ground
OF GOD AND MAN AT WAR

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- God Bless America.

Momentum: THE AFGHANI WOMAN

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In a warm and tender moment, my husband wraps his arms around me and holds me tight against his heart.

Ink Soup: THE NEW YORKER LIFTED MY WORK!

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- During my years as Cartoon Editor of the old Saturday Review (under the editorship of Norman Cousins and then Carll Tucker) I often received in the mail a drawing that strongly reminded me of something I'd seen before.

Hominy & Hash
SONGS OF WAR: THE DRUMS RUM-TUMMING EV'RYWHERE

by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- When Barbara Streisand closed the Emmy Awards Show with an inimitable rendition of "You'll Never Walk Alone," she proved once more that music certainly "...doth have charms to soothe the savage breast."

Commentary
ARE WE ON THE BRINK 0F LIMITLESS WAR?

by Will Hart

TUSCON, Ariz. -- Nearly everyone seems to agree that military action had to be taken against the terrorists that committed the atrocities of September 11. But what actions exactly has the American public agreed to? President Bush initially outlined a campaign that had two goals: Neutralize Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaeda network and get rid of the Taliban. Those twin goals seemed logical and doable at first glance. As a nation, we signed on.

Editorial: HOW I CAME TO LOVE THE WAR

by Joe Shea

Can anyone imagine Muhammad Ali saying just after the Sept. 11 attacks on New York, "I don't have any quarrel" with Osama bin Laden and his Al Qaeda network, as the champ famously said of the Viet Cong 30 years ago?

A.R.'S TRAGESER HONORED BY SAN DIEGO PRESS CLUB

American Reporter Staff

SAN DIEGO, Oct. 12, 2001 -- The American Reporter was recognized for journalistic excellence by the San Diego Press Club on Thursday evening.

Momentum
THE RECURRING NIGHTMARE OF SEPTEMBER 11

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt., Oct. 11, 2001 -- It's been exactly a month since the Sept. 11 attacks, and I still return to the World Trade Center every night in my dreams.

Caring: FINAL THINGS

by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- One of the things that makes working with the frail elderly so different from other relationships is that you must help them face difficult issues without a lot of lead time.

America At War
U.S., BRITAIN LAUNCH AIR WAR ON AFGHANISTAN

by Joe Shea

WASHINGTON Oct. 7, 2001 -- Acting on orders from President George W. Bush, 40 American bombers struck military targets in Afghanistan this morning and a British submarine launched Tomahawk missiles against Osama bin Laden's terrorist training camps in response to the Sept. 11 attacks that killed thousands of Americans at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

On Native Ground
DON'T LET FREE SPEECH BE A CASUALTY OF WAR

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The thought police are on the prowl, making sure that all good Americans stand united and resolute behind President Bush and his Administration in the conduct of the war against international terrorism.

Momentum: KILLING THEM SOFTLY

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There are two ways to train a dog -- affection and fear. Maybe the United States has the same kind of choice when it comes to dealing with its enemies. I am not alone in believing that we should try to end terrorism with a combination of kindness and capitalism.

Reporting: Indonesia
IN JAKARTA, THE SMALL TALK IS OF JIHAD

by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, Oct. 2, 2001 -- It was a warm evening in Jakarta last Monday and I cooled myself down in a cozy garden restaurant, a place where Indonesian journalists, artists, and sometimes its fiery student leaders, spend many of their evenings.

Editorial
HOW THE FUTURE IS BETRAYED

by Joe Shea

This is not an editorial about the economy, but the economy is a good place to begin. This is an editorial about where things must end.

Hominy & Hash
A NEW YORKER'S DAY OF TERROR

by Constance Daley with Gene Albertelli

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- (Editor's Note: Regrettably, we were unable to publish on Sept. 11 and Sept. 12, and this article was temporarily lost. We publish it now with our apologies to the authors.) Yesterday, the majestic southern skyline of New York crumbled at her feet with the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center collapsing inwardly at the insult, not keeling over in defeat.

Ink Soup
TWO PLANS FOR THE END OF DAYS

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE -- Now here are my plans, both of them. 1) The obvious plan. We have been hit. This is war. We will find out who was behind the terrorists and we will bomb them back even further into the Stone Age than they already are.

On Native Ground
THE BRAVERY OF BARBARA LEE

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- President Bush's address to Congress on Sept. 20 was a declaration of war that is unprecedented in our nation's history.

Momentum
WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM JERRY FALWELL?

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The week after the terrorist attacks on New York City and Washington, the Rev. Jerry Falwell apologized for saying on Pat Robertson's "The 700 Club" television show that they reflected God's judgment on a nation spiritually weakened by the American Civil Liberties Union, providers of abortion, supporters of gay rights, and federal court rulings banning prayer in schools.

American Essay
FROM THE TERROR, TIMELESS PERSONAL LESSONS

by Gary Gach

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- As the world sorts through the rubble, internal and external, following September 11, I'm beginning to recover my own voice. For a while I was in shock. Frozen, almost. Numb.

Caring: A NOD TO AGING EROS

by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- George loved trains, music, and women -- mostly women.

Reporting: Terror
BANK SECRECY SPEEDS MONEY TO TERRORISTS

by Lucy Komisar

NEW YORK -- Terrorist networks all over the world depend on the international bank and corporate secrecy system to hide and move their money. This structure is allowed to exist by agreement of the world's banks and financial powers. A lot of people make money from it, including the owners and managers of banks that hide customers' deposits from tax authorities. But an unintendedconsequence is that it helps worldwide networks of terrorists.

Reporting: Terror
TALIBAN 'ENCOURAGE' OSAMA TO 'LEAVE OF HIS OWN FREE WILL'

by Joe Shea

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan, Sept. 21, 2001 (1 A.M. PST) -- Defying American demands to hand over the prime suspect in the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, a three-day meeting of Afghanistan's ruling clerical council expressed regret early Friday morning for the attacks and called on terrorism suspect Osama Bin Laden to "leave Afghanistan of his own free will" but then declared that Islamic nations must join an international Islamic jihad, or holy war, against the United States if it is attacked.

Momentum
THE DAGGER IN OUR EYE

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt., Sept. 19, 2001 -- Many people don't know this, but during the Persian Gulf War, only a handful of newspapers in the United States had the courage to editorialize against it. One was my hometown newspaper, the Brattleboro (Vt.) Reformer. At the time, it was also my employer.

Market Mover
STEVE LONG WAS BIN LADEN'S WORST NIGHTMARE

by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla., Sept. 19, 2001 -- Regrettably and ironically, Osama bin Laden and I now have something in common: Neither one of us will ever get to meet U.S. Army Maj. Stephen V. Long.

Terror & The Press
THE PRESS HAS FAILED US

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A couple of days after the horror in New York and Washington, I got an e-mail from Carl Jensen, founder of the press analysis project called Project Censored.

On Native Ground
A TIME TO THINK CLEARLY

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The war drums are beating. The primal urge for revenge is rising. The flags are waving and blind patriotism is the orderof the day. And many, many more innocents will die.

AMERICA'S LOSS OF INNOCENCE

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As I write this early on Wednesday morning, all I can think is that now it's about us.

An A.R. Editorial
CHOOSING A JUST PUNISHMENT FOR A TERRIBLE CRIME

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- No one can feel sanguine about the reprisals that are in the works against terrorists who destroyed the World Trade Center towers and scarred the Pentagon.

TERRORISM, TV AND THE RAGE FOR VENGEANCE

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- We stare at television screens and try to comprehend the suffering in the aftermath of terrorism. Much of what we see is ghastly and all too real: terrible anguish and sorrow.

On Native Ground
STAR WARS REDUX: PEACE FOR A PIPE DREAM

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- During the week that marked the 10th anniversary of the failed coup in the Soviet Union - the event that led to its eventual collapse - President Bush took two steps that showed that in some cornersof Washington, the Cold War never ended.

An A.R. Exclusive
SECRET RULING ON POOH RIGHTS 'DEVASTATING' TO DISNEY, PLAINTIFFS SAY

by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, August 23, 2001 -- A still-secret decision on sanctions against the Burbank-based Walt Disney Co. for "willful destruction" of evidence in a long-running royalties battle is "devastating" to its claim that it owes no royalties on Winnie The Pooh videos, computer software and other commercializations of the world's most popular cartoon character, a plaintiffs' attorney familiar with the sealed opinion said Wednesday.

DISNEY ASKS NEW AUDIT OF POOH ROYALTIES

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, August 17, 2001 -- The Walt Disney Co., apparently stung by charges that accounting chicanery helped it conceal about $100 million in revenues from one of its most significant royalty participants, asked Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Ernest Hiroshige Thursday to approve a new "high level audit" of its Winnie The Pooh payments after an $800,000, 5,000-hour audit turned up little in the way of new royalties owed.

FINAL ARGUMENTS DUE ON POOH ROYALTIES

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, August 15, 2001 -- Final arguments are due today in Los Angeles County Superior Court after a two-day hearing on accounting methods used by the Walt Disney Co. to calculate Winnie The Pooh royalties paid to the heirs of "Red Ryder" producer Stephen A. Slesinger.

LEGAL TITANS CLASH OVER POOH'S HONEY

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, August 14, 2001 -- Two of the most famous lawyers in America quietly collided Monday in a California courtroom over royalty payments on one of the most famous and lucrative literary characters ever created, with Hollywood superlawyer Bert Fields saying the owners of U.S. and Canadian rights to exploit Winnie The Pooh are owed hundreds of millions of dollars by the Walt Disney Co. on a contract first negotiated by Walt Disney himself, and the other, O.J. Simpson nemesis Daniel Petrocelli, saying anything owing under an agreement with the man who created Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck has already been paid.

Editorial: THERE'S NO MORAL SIDE IN MID-EAST CONFLICT

by Joe Shea

We have watched events unfold at a quickening pace in the Middle East with a mixture of dread, anticipation and sorrow. Dread because we know that the ultimate resolution of this spiraling conflict could involve a regional war, an energy embargo or even the use of nuclear weapons; anticipation because we constantly await intervention on the side of peace -- divine, American, or multinational, or, God forbid, Iraqi, Iranian, Syrian, Libyan on the side of war, even as we also await the next bombing, bulldozing, rocket attack or assassination in the region; and sorrow because we know it is so unnecessary. God must hate these people, I sometimes think, because they do so many terrible things to one another in His name.

Momentum:
FRAIL MY HEART: FOLK MUSIC AND ME (PART I)

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In my neck of the woods, New England, last week was folk music heaven. The Falcon Ridge Folk Festival was held on the green rolling hills of Long Hill Farm in Hillsdale, N.Y., the weekend of July 27-29, followed right afterward, on the same site, by the Winterhawk Festival, dedicated to "bluegrass and beyond."

Exclusive: OCTANE RATING SLIPS ALONG WITH GASOLINE PRICES

by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- If you live in Los Angeles, take a good look at the octane rating for premium gas when you stop by to fill up your tank today.

Momentum: THE BLACK AND WHITE OF COLOR TELEVISION

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- There's a yin and a yang to everything,=

Ink Soup: KARTOON KAMP

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I am in recovery from my first effort to teach cartoon= ing to three little boys. If only I'd thought of it in time, I would have done homage to George Herriman, creator of Krazy Kat and the greatest of Am= erican comic strip artists, by calling it the Kartoon Kamp.

Editorial: DAY OF THE VIRUS

by Joe Shea

In the last five days I've gotten about 40 email messages containing the SIRCAM virus. None of them -- nor any of the hundreds of viruses that came before it -- damaged my computer because they all came to shell accounts. Those are text-only email accounts used by a lot of Net professionals that speed up most email processing.

FMD IN WALES 'MISSED THE PRESS'

by Allan R. Andrews

ANNAPOLIS, Md. -- A week after reporting that foot and mouth disease has been wreaking havoc with tourists and walkers along the Pembrokeshire Coast of Wales -- an area that comprises Great Britain's only National Park that includes long stretches of rugged coastline -- I came home to discover that the outbreak has also wrought a bit of havoc with publications in the United States.

On Native Ground: TO DIE IN GENOA

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt., July 28, 2001 -- It was inevitable, given the fear of the established order when faced with organized dissent, that someone would die in Genoa during the G-8 summit. Since the demonstrations at the World Trade Organization's meeting in Seattle in 1999, the police presence needed to protect each succeeding gathering of those who want to plunder the world for profit has been increased. And the helmeted, club-wielding protectors of the rulers have no interest in upholding the right to protest.

Media Beat: THE MEDIA'S DANCE ON CARLO GIULIANI'S GRAVE

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- After a police officer shot Carlo Giuliani in the head, Ti= me magazine published a requiem of sorts -- explaining that the 23-year-old=

Momentum: A DEMONSTRATION OF EMOTION

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- When I arrived at the demonstration I burst into tear= s. A few moments later, I was surprised to find myself taking shelter in a=

In Memoriam: AN AFTERNOON WITH MISS EUDORA

by Clarence Brown

JACKSON, Miss. -- On the telephone she'd said, "Tell the driver it's the Belhaven neighborhood - he'll know where that is." Her house is across the street from Belhaven College, in northeast Jackson. She comes out onto the front step when the cab pulls into the yard of 1119 Pinehurst Street and smiles at the automobile. There is some delay while the young cabby fumbles for change and the mechanism that will unlock my door.

An AR Analysis MOUNTAIN OF PROBLEMS AWAITS MEGAWATI

by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA -- New Indonesian President Megawati Sukarnoputri is arguably the most popular leader in Indonesia, having fervent supporters in all walks of life, from movie stars to street vendors, from Muslim clerics to Christian activists in this vast archipelago of 220 million people.

Reporting: Indonesia
IN PEACEFUL SHIFT, INDONESIA GETS A NEW PRESIDENT

by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, July 23, 2001 -- In a fast-moving and dramatic political struggle that involved many political parties, the military, the police, and the media, Indonesia's national assembly fired President Abdurrahman Wahid and today installed his deputy Megawati Sukarnoputri as president.

Reporting: Indonesia
WAHID GOVERNMENT NEARS COLLAPSE IN INDONESIA

by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, July 23, 2001 -- Indonesia's President Abdurrahman Wahid today ordered the dissolution of parliament, "froze" the main opposition party Golkar and called for elections a year from now, but his generals and Jakarta police refused to carry out the orders as leaders of the nation's parliament gathered to oust him.

Native Ground
LET'S GET BIG MONEY OUT OF POLITICS

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- No one does absurdity quite like Congress. What other conclusion can one come to after watching them argue over the "Patients Bill of Rights" and campaign finance reform.

Editorial: HOW MUCH SEX DOES AMERICA WANT?

by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- A cartoon in the news section of the LA Weekly's July 19 edition shows a tiny fellow of indeterminate age, maybe 15 or so, masturbating in one panel as he watches tv, and then angrily stomping on his emission in the next.

Media Beat: KATHARINE GRAHAM'S FIRST DRAFT

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Some time before he committed suicide 38 years ago, leaving the Washington Post Co. in the hands of his widow Katharine, publisher Philip Graham described journalism as "the first draft of history."

i>On Native Ground
BBC PULLS THE PLUG ON SHORTWAVE LISTENERS by Randolph T. Holhut

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In the summer of 1984, I was living in Wolfeboro Falls, N.H., near Lake Winnipesaukee. It was a dead zone for television and radio and the Boston papers just barely made it up there.

Momentum: N.Y. TIMES AS 'NEWSPAPER OF PART OF THE RECORD'

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- In last month's U.S. Supreme Court decision for Jonathan Tasini of the National Writers Union (I am a member) over The New York Times, the 1976 U.S. Copyright Law was upheld, freelance writers' rights were reasserted, and publishers and data collectors were told to stop stealing their work.

Cindy Hasz: THE YATES TRAGEDY REVEALS EVILS OF PASSIVITY

by Cindy Hasz, R.N.

SAN DIEGO -- It's been over two weeks now since Andrea Yates killed her five children. Immediately after it happened I heard snippets of news about the horror, and saw the supposedly grief-stricken father holding a family photo out on the lawn of the family home as he talked poignantly about his wife's mental illness.

MAOIST INSURGENTS KILL 41 POLICEMEN IN NEPAL

by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, July 7, 2001 -- Underground Maoist rebels in this land-locked and troubled Kingdom killed at least 41 policemen last night in three separate incidents in western Nepal. It was the most deadly attack by Maoists since the Royal Palace massacre, in which 10 people including the King, Queen, Crown Prince, and members of the royal family were killed by the former Crown Prince.

On Native Ground: THE QUARTERLIFE CRISIS

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- You've heard of midlife crisis, that point when you hit 50 and generally freak out. Now, in this accelerated age we are living in, there's a new malady: The quarterlife crisis.

A.R. Special Report:
TOURISM TO BEAUTIFUL WALES HURT BY FMD EPIDEMIC

by Allan R. Andrews

FISHGUARD, Pembrokeshire, Wales -- Foot-and-mouth disease, which has made eating beef in Britain a rare event, is subtly devastating the tourist trade in this paradise of nature and Celtic history.

Momentum: LOVE LETTER TO A FLEA MARKET

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Sunny Sunday mornings in summer mean only one thing to me -- the flea market is open. I'm out of bed and in my car as the sun is rising.

Happy Birthday, America!

Editorial: LOOKING FOR AMERICA

by Joe Shea

As we celebrate America's birthday today, I can't resist the observation that while America remains a bright and hopeful dream to the poor and oppressed in many parts of the world, to many Americans it has become a memory.

An A.R. Essay: BOOMING IN AMERICA

by Lory Medina

LONG BEACH, Calif. -- I've just relocated to California, and I'm actively watching things.

On Native Ground: SAYING 'GOOD NIGHT' TO THE EVENING NEWSPAPER

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- My newspaper, the Eagle Times, ended nearly 87 years as an afternoon publication on June 29.

Make My Day: I'M 238 IN DOG YEARS

by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- It was my birthday this past Wednesday, and I turned 34. I'm not complaining, because I've enjoyed my 30s so far, and am looking forward to the next several years of them. In fact, I've enjoyed it so much that I may do a couple of my favorite years again. What I do want to complain about is the date of my birthday, June 27th. I was born right at the stroke of midnight on June 27th, 1967. However, my mom went into labor on the 26th.

Momentum: ERASING 'THE FIRST DRAFT OF HISTORY'

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Remember the spoiled kid who whined that he'd take his toys and go home if you didn't play the game his way? That's the way The New York Times has been behaving since June 25, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled against the paper and in favor of freelancers' rights. It isn't a pretty sight.

7.9 QUAKE KILLS AT LEAST 47, INJURES HUNDREDS IN PERU

by Joe Shea

AREQUIPA, Peru, June 24, 2001 -- One of the most powerful earthquakes ever to hit the Western Hemisphere struck the "white city" of Arequipa, Peru, on Saturday afternoon, terrifying residents who felt the entire city shake and watched a tower on one the nation's oldest cathedrals crumble to the ground. At least 47 people died and many hundreds more were injured.

On Native Ground: EUROPEANS AREN'T ANTI-AMERICAN, JUST ANTI-BUSH

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It's been amusing to read how the conservative chattering class has reacted to President Bush's recent trip to Europe.

Momentum: CENSORING THE INTERNET IN THE NAME OF KIDS

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt., June 21, 2001 -- What is the biggest threat to children on the Internet? Of the more than 39,000 Netscape users who voted on that question on Wednesday, 45 percent said the biggest threat by far was sexual predators. Porn was considered a bigger threat by 26 percent, hate sites by16 percent, violence by 7 percent, and "other" by 6 percent.

Dungeons of Debt
'LATE FEE' RIP-OFFS HIT CONSUMERS, COLLEGE KIDS HARD

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, June 18, 2001 -- Don't even be a day late with your $12 Pep Boys payment, if you're a basic user of its charge card - it will cost you $29. Be certain to get your $5 Macy's payment in on time - the company charges $25 if it's late.

An AR Special Report
CROWN PRINCE SAID RESPONSIBLE FOR ROYAL MASSACRE

by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, June 17, 2001 -- The great dramatist Shakespeare in King Richard III writes, "And my large kingdom for a little grave, an obscure grave." Those words came true for Nepal's royalty when the nation's Crown Prince in a movie-style massacre took the life of the whole royal family and turned the Royal Palace into an empty house of ghosts.

Editorial: THE DEATH AND LIFE OF JOURNALISM

by Joe Shea

"Fatigue makes cowards of us all. It also makes it tough to sound coherent," the lettter from an old newspaper pal back East begins. After a long time in the trenches, she's taken over the reins of daily newspaper on the Atlantic coast.

On Native Ground: BUSH, GOP PLAY THE TAX CUT SHELL GAME

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So, what are you going to do with your rebate? The $600 that my wife and I are likely to get from President Bush's tax cuts are enough to pay for the five cords of firewood we burn each year to heat the house. It might cover the next brake job I need on my 1997 Geo Metro, maybe with enough over for a set of tires. Or it could pay for replacing the rotting parts of our back deck.

Media Beat: PRAISE FOR PENTAGON PAPERS RINGS HOLLOW

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- When they challenged the power of the White House by claiming the right to publish the Pentagon Papers, the nation's two most in fluential newspapers took a laudable stand. During the three decades since then, praise for their journalistic courage has become a time-honored ritual in the media world.

Make My Day: WILL YOU GO WITH ME?

by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- When I was in middle school, there were three very good reasons I didn't date: I never had any money, I couldn't drive, and I was a bit of a goober (and for those of you who might say things haven't changed much in the past 20 years, let me remind you that I am the World's Strongest Humorist for a reason).

Momentum: THOU SHALT NOT KILL

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- So, are you "healed" now? Have you found "closure"? Can you get back to your "normal life" now that Timothy McVeigh no longer walks (or sits in a jail cell) among us? Doesn't it feel good to= punish? Isn't revenge great?

An AR Exclusive
INDONESIA ARRESTS LEFT-LEANING SCHOLARS

by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, June 12, 2001 1:25am (PDT) -- On a hot and humid afternoon last Friday, June 8, Giles Ji Ungpakorn sat inside a conference room and listened to a Japanese scholar speaking about the economic crisis and macroeconomic policies in Japan. A big, green rectangular table with some 80 people around it dominated the meeting room at a well-known resort in suburban Jakarta.

An American Reporter Special Report
"Tim McVeigh's Day of Reckoning"

McVEIGH STAYS SILENT TO THE END

by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, June 11, 2001 -- Timothy McVeigh went to his death Monday=

Media Beat: IN MEDIALAND, IT WAS TIME TO KILL

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Minutes after a federal judge ruled that the execution of Timothy McVeigh should proceed on June 11 as scheduled, CNN was airing live=

Editorial: UPON THE DEATH OF TIMOTHY McVEIGH

by Joe Shea

As I write this morning, a blind man is speaking to the media in Oklahoma City after the execution of Timothy McVeigh for the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building that took 168 lives. In the plain tones of Oklahoma, "McVeigh was a coward, and a low-down bastard," said the man, who operated the concession stand in the building and was inside when the explosion occurred.

On Native Ground: WHO'S THE REAL ROGUE NATION?

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- We are the last remaining superpower. We dominate the=

McVEIGH ENDS APPEALS PROCESS, PREPARES TO DIE

by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, June 7, 2001 -- A federal appeals court rejected Timothy McVeigh's bid for a stay of execution Thursday and the Oklahoma City bomber=

Momentum: DEATH OF A JAZZMAN

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- It was December of 1997, I was sitting at a diner, I was waiting to interview jazz guitar master Attila Zoller, and I was nervous. Attila's lifelong dream -- a permanent home for his beloved Vermont Jazz Center, was coming true after 27 years. But I also knew that he was dying. I'd seen him only a few months before, at a Sonny Rollins concert (he played with Rollins in the '50s), and he looked fine -- broad shoulders, big grin, black captain's hat pulled low over his eyes.

McVEIGH TRIAL JUDGE LETS EXECUTION DATE STAND

by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, June 6, 2001 -- The judge who heard Timothy McVeigh's bombing case said Wednesday it was "shocking" that the FBI had failed to turn over all evidence to the defendant, but he said there was nothing in thousands of additional pages that were withheld that would keep McVeigh from dying as scheduled next Monday.

Election 2001: L.A.
HAHN TIDE SWEEPS AWAY HOPE OF LATINO MAYOR FOR L.A.

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, July 6, 2001, 6:00am (PST) -- Many, many months ago, when the election that concluded today for Mayor of Los Angeles was still two years ahead, the smart money and the inside people at City Hall East - the modern building where city government has waited out a $350 million rehab of L.A.'s famed City Hall, just across Spring St. - put their money on tall, affable City Attorney James Hahn, the scion of a political dynasty that has enjoyed popular support in this city for half a century. This morning, two years and $13 million later, Hahn is Mayor-elect.

On Native Ground: REP. MOAKLEY'S LAST MISSION WAS CLOSING THE 'SCHOOL OF ASSASSINS'

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- On the first of June, they buried Congressman Joe Moakley in his beloved hometown of South Boston.

Editorial: MIKE WOO FOR CITY COUNCIL

by Joe Shea

The race for Hollywood's Los Angeles City Council seat has come down to two exceptional young men, former City Councilman Mike Woo and challenger Eric Garcetti, a prominent leader of Amnesty International and the son of former Los Angeles County District Atty. Gil Garcetti.

Make My Day: FROM MMD THEATER, IT'S THE BARB AND JENNA SHOW

by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind., June 1, 2001 -- {Editor's Note: In comments yesterday, the White House press office advised media to "think over very c arefully" our treatment of what was termed a "private family matter" concer ning the adventures of First Twins Barbara and Jenna Bush. Having given the

Editorial: VILLARAIGOSA FOR MAYOR OF LOS ANGELES

by Joe Shea

In this city of dreams, none burns brighter than that of Antonio Villaraigosa. From the East Los Angeles barrio to the mansions of theaffluent West Side, his vision for the City of Angels has inspired, united, renewed and lifted us, revitalized our decaying democratic process, and offered meaningful change to a population that has heard it promised many times but now has a real opportunity to see it come.

Media Beat: AT COMMENCEMENT, JOURNALISM HAS A HAZY FUTURE

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Today, departing from an institution steeped in modernity, you say farewell to a fine journalism school. Honored to address this graduating class, I will speak with uncommon candor about the wisdom of your training and the opportunities that lie ahead.

Momentum: THE WIT AND WISDOM OF FRED EAGLESMITH

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If there was anyone left in Nashville with a brain, Fred Eaglesmith would be selling CDs by the millions.

Ink Soup: WITH APOLOGIES TO EMILY

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- There are times when I consider Whitman to be the greatest American poet. But then there are other days, and today is one of them, when I am absolutely sure that it is Emily Dickinson.

In Solemn Memory
of

Richard Marsh, Paul Roberts and Phil Ruminski
and
All Our Honored Dead

Editorial
I AM NOT A HERO

by Joe Shea

When the time came to fight the Vietnam War and I was called up, I could not allow myself to be sworn into the armed services for the simplest of reasons: I could not kill another human being.

On Native Ground: JAMES JEFFORDS AND THE VERMONT TRADITION OF INDEPE=

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Vermont Sen. James Jeffords has long had areputation for being a low-profile politician who rarely strays from themiddle of the road on most issues.

Media Beat: SIMULATING DEMOCRACY CAN BE A VIRTUAL BREEZE

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Few media eyebrows went up when the World Bank recently ca= nceled a global meeting set for Barcelona in late June -- and shifted it to=

Momentum: HEY, FRAT BOY! MEET THE GROUPIES

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As I was driving on a recent Spring weekend through H= anover, N.H., the home of Dartmouth College, I noticed that several of the fraternities were having outdoor parties. Crowds of young men and women mi= ngled happily on lawns with paper cups in their hands.

Market Mover: TRY SETTING A 20% STOCK TARGET

by Mark Scheinbaum

BOCA RATON, Fla., May 22, 2001 -- Do you have the discipline to take your winnings off the table and walk away? Never?

Hominy & Hash: THE HOME STRETCH

by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Our own personal comfort zone is built more by our associations than by anything we do to create it.

On Native Ground: CONSERVATION IS SANE RESPONSE TO ENERGY SHORTAG=

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The first load of our wood supply for next winter arr= ived a few days ago. Our wood guy said he sold nearly 1,000 cords of wood l= ast winter, and could have sold double that if he had it. Because we're lon= g-time customers, he made sure we got our supply ahead of the folks who are=

Make My Day: SOMETIMES LIFE JUST AIN'T FAIR, EH?

by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Earlier this week, I had a chance to spend a few days in Canada on business in Guelph, Ontario. I had a great time, and deci= ded that Canada is an excellent place to visit. The people are very friendl= y, the scenery is beautiful, and the towns are very clean and pretty safe. Oh, by the way, Guelph is pronounced "Gwelf," not"Goo-elf," as I found out.=

Media Beat: FROM ITALY, HERE COMES 'MEDIA' DEMOCRACY

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- Now that Italy's voters have given the job of prime minister to media magnate Silvio Berlusconi, others may wish to follow his example on this side of the Atlantic.

Opinion: POLYGAMY TRIAL RAISES RIGHTS ISSUES

by Godfrey D. Lehman

SAN FRANCISCO -- Way down at the tag end of the Constitution in Article VI (the next to last) is a declaration just as clear -- and indisputable --=

Momentum: THE UTTERLY DISPOSABLE FEMALE

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Here's a riddle for you: What may be the most worthless thing on the planet? The answer: An old woman -- unless it's a young girl. And I'm sorry if you're been offended, but that's the unhappy conclusion I've drawn from a number of recent news stories.

Hominy & Hash: CLOSURE, FOR LACK OF A BETTER WORD

by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Whether it's a school shooting, the Oklahoma bombing, a suicide or a Volkswagen hitting and killing my teenaged son, there is no closure beyond what happens at the very moment our loved one dies.

Ink Soup: THE TUNA DIALOGUES

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- My cat Huck has now reached, and even exceeded, the age of discretion, and is, like all cats, naturally fond of philosophical discussion. Too fond, as will appear below.

Reporting: Indonesia
AS INDONESIA AWAITS HER RISE, MEGAWATI'S RULE IS STUDIED

by Andreas Harsono

JAKARTA, May 14, 2001 -- In late 1996, Megawati Sukarnoputri was a real loner, although perhaps not by choice. The authoritarian regime of President Suharto organized a bogus party congress and supported her opposition inside the Indonesian Democratic Party to topple her from its leadership.

The American Reporter Wishes
Every Mom A

Happy Mother's Day!

Cindy Hasz: JONATHAN'S STORY

by Cindy Hasz

Blood clots like berries stuck in your hair.

Happy Mother's Day!
Momentum: HAPPY MOTHER'S DAY, MOM

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Although the mother-daughter relationship is grounded=

REPORTS OF BREAK IN MUMIA CASE NOT BORNE OUT

American Reporter Staff

PHILADELPHIA, May 14, 2001 -- Reports circulating in Philadelphia, San F= rancisco and elsewhere that a major break is imminent in the case against b= lack journalist Abu-Mumia Jamal of Philadelphia, charged with the Dec. 9, 1= 981, murder of city policeman Daniel Faulkner, cannot be confirmed.

On Native Ground: DECONSTRUCTING THE KENTUCKY DERBY

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Maybe I think this because I love newspapers but it's=

McVEIGH EXECUTION POSPONED DUE TO FBI SLIP-UP

by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, May 11, 2001 -- Timothy McVeigh, who had rejected any further appeals of his death penalty for the federal building bombing, was given a 30-day stay of execution Thursday after the FBI revealed it had withheld some evidence at his trial.

FBI SAYS McVEIGH EVIDENCE WITHHELD

by Bill Johnson

OKLAHOMA CITY, May 10, 2001 -- The FBI informed a federal judge and Timo= thy McVeigh's defense attorneys Thursday it had found a quantity of evidenc= e in the Oklahoma City federal building bombing case that had never been re= vealed to McVeigh's lawyers.

Make My Day: I'LL SELL YOU A BIG HOLE IN ARIZONA

by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- How much does a hole in the ground cost? G= enerally they're free. When I was about nine years old, FreddieWalker, Mick= ey and Bobby Workman and I spent a week that summer digginga hole in Mickey=

Ink Soup: PRAYER 101

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- I am a week or two shy of the age of 72 -- patriarchal=

An A.R. Special Report
"FIGHTING FMD"

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES, May 5, 2001 -- A 1999 study by the University of California=

On Native Ground: PUBLIC RADIO WAITS FOR A GREAT LEAP FORWARD by Randolph T. Holhut

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- At a time when newspapers, news magazines and tv news programs are all seeing their audiences erode, there is one exception: National Public Radio.

Editorial: GET READY FOR 'PORN BARS'

by Joe Shea

A California liquor agency rule that prohibits bars from showingnon-obsc= ene porn films and photos is about to be repealed; now,neighborhoods across=

Make My Day: I'VE GOT ALL MY TOES, TOO

by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- For those of you who know me (and care), my wife,=

Momentum: PICASSO'S PORN

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- What do performer Jennifer Lopez's nipples have to do with Pablo Picasso? Give me a few minutes and I'll tell you.

Hominy & Hash: IF I WANT A POLICEMAN, I'LL DIAL 9-1-1

by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- There are more policemen around than you=

Opinion: WE HAVE MET THE ENEMY'S STOCK PORTFOLIO, AND IT IS OURS

by Jim Trageser

ESCONDIDO, Calif. -- It's weeks like those just past that we realiz= e what we may have missed in not electing Ralph Nader or Pat Buchanan to th= e White House.

Ink Soup: 170 AND COUNTING

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- In two weeks from today, on May 16, we are going to k= ill Timothy J. McVeigh as a punishment for his having killed 169 people in the 1995 bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City. I say "we," fo= r whether you are opposed to capital punishment, as I am, or for it, it is we together who are going to take his life, sincethe executioner will be ou= r own federal government.

First Person
KERREY & KERRY: TWO FACES OF VIETNAM

by Joe Shea

Former U.S. Sen. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska and Massachusetts U.S. Sen. John F. Kerry are two very different men despite their identical-sounding names, distinguished war records, honored Senate careers, famous ex-girlfriends and longstanding friendship. But when each of them faced a choice in Vietnam about whether or not to kill unarmed civilians, they made very different decisions.

On Native Ground: LOOKING FOR THE UNTOLD STORIES

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt., April 29, 2001 -- Are you as sick of hearing Ari Fleischer's voice as I am?

Momentum: LOVE ON A SMALL BOAT

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- She was English, and her name was Clarice, which she pronounced "Claris," so that it sounded like the name of someone who was very clear on things.

LOS ANGELES MURDER RATE SHOOTS UP 100%? NOT!

by Joe Shea

LOS ANGELES -- An email news briefing distributed Wednesday by the Los Angeles Police Commission may have left some people thinking the City of Angels is becoming a city of carnage with a murder rate that has climbed 100 percent in a single year.

Ink Soup: RANDY THE BUILDER

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- We have been somehow adopted by a carpenter, a young f= ellow whose family origin, Texas, and last name, Walker, testify to his kin= ship to the current occupant of the White House. Since his father is somet= hing or other in local Democratic politics, the connection is not a thing t= hey willingly talk about, though, to his credit, he is not ashamed of it.

Hominy & Hash: FROM CORONA A PLACE TO CORONA A BEER: A BRIEF HISTORY=

by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- At 12, we would snicker, "I wish I were=

Editorial: CURING THE CHECHEN MADNESS

by Joe Shea

The internationalization of the Chechen conflict was dramatically brought home again Sunday when Chechen gunmen seized a Swiss-owned luxury hotel in Istanbul; after tense hours of standoff, 13 Chechen "soldiers" were taken into custody, and the hostages they held were freed unharmed.

The American Way
TV TURNOFF WEEK TURNS ME ON

by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD -- It's been nearly 35 years now since I left my parents' home at 19 and entered into a life without television.

On Native Ground
INSTEAD OF BLAMING NADER, DEMOCRATS SHOULD HEED HIM

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The first 100 days of the George W. Bush administration have certainly been no surprise, unless you actually believed all that "compassionate conservative" nonsense that he was spouting on the campaign trail.

Media BeatBIAS AND FEAR TILT COVERAGE OF ISRAEL

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- When the New York Times finally printed the name of a 12-year-old organization called Rabbis for Human Rights, the mention had to be bought -- in a full-page ad expressing support for actions by the group, which is "the only Israeli rabbinic association that includes Orthodox, Reform, Reconstructionist and Conservative rabbis."

Ink Soup: ICHIRO, KAZU, AND I

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The Mariners baseball team boasts not one but two openly Japanese players, both of whom have captured the hearts of all fans, including this one, and compensated to a degree for the defection of A-Rod (Mr. Alex Rodriguez to his household staff), who has elected, on his agent's advice, to join some team in Arlington, Texas, wherever that is.

On Native Ground: A SECRET TRADE PACT EVEN WORSE THAN NAFTA

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- If you thought the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) was a disaster, its sequel - the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) - promises to be even worse.

Editorial: AMERICAN REPORTER CELEBRATES 7TH YEAR ON THE NET

by Joe Shea

HOLLYWOOD, April 11, 2001 -- Today marks the start of the seventh year of operation for The American Reporter, the first and now the longest-lived Internet daily newspaper in the world.

Media Beat: IF THE E-3 AFFAIR HAPPENED HERE

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- One of the ways to test for media slant is to put th= e shoe on the other foot. A big story this month provides an opportunity fo= r inquiry in the world of intense media spin.

On Native Ground: IS IT TOO LATE TO STOP GLOBAL WARMING? =

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- As I write this, in the first week of April,it's hard=

Hominy & Hash: HIGH PROFILE CASES SHINE A LIGHT, CAST SHADOWS

by Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- This isn't about voting, right and wrong -- although at the time that was the big story. It's about what we know now because we listened then.

Monentum
'FRIENDS' MAY BE OUR ENEMY

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Selling out used to be something to be ashamed of. Now, if you don't sell out, it just means that no one wants to buy what you have.

American Sports: 'BIG UNIT' WAS BAY AREA BOY OF SUMMER by Steven Travers

by Steven Travers

PHOENIX, April 4, 2001 -- He is the Paul Bunyan of baseball. In the modern day version of David vs. Goliath, he is Goliath. This guy is not Everyman. He is to pitching what Rommel was to desert combat, Chuck Yeager to aviation, Einstein to quantum theory. Randy Johnson's natural skills make him stand out above and beyond the normal, the average, and the humdrum.

Hominy & Hash: YOU CAN'T TAKE IT, SO LEAVE IT by Constance Daley

Constance Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- After the tributes and testimony, a few weeks beyond the traditional end of any public mourning for adistinguished member of the dearly departed, we might come across some scant reference to the disposition of the Last Will and Testament to provide for the distribution of one's worldly goods. Unless the will is contested over the deceased's intention, we never hear of it again.

On Native Ground
DEALING WITH 'MAD DOW' DISEASE

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Will you still have a song to sing/ When the Razor Boy comes and takes your fancy things away?/ Will you still be singing it on that cold and windy day? The refrain from Steely Dan's song "Razor Boy" drifted into my head as I watched the carnage of the last few weeks on Wall Street. The Razor Boy was on the prowl.

An A.R. Special Report
Save Our City!

Editorial: A CITY AS BIG AS ITS DREAMS

by Joe Shea

The great rollicking blues number "Save Our City!," a tune that the wild L.A. R&B band Top Jimmy & The Rhythm Pigs transformed into an anthem of the 80s, may be even more timely now.

Save Our City!
AN AMERICAN CITY FIGHTS FOR ITS SURVIVAL by Samuel J. Scott

by Samuel J. Scott

BELLEVILLE, Ill. -- The Main Street running through the largest city in southwestern Illinois is one of the longest in the world, most residents here are quick to brag. Few acknowledge it is also one of the quietest.

Save Our City!
FOR MY DOWNTOWN, AN IDEA SO OLD IT'S NEW

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- A few years ago, retail stores around here started dropping like flies.

Make My Day
BURN YOUR MONEY SO IT WON'T GET STOLEN

by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Sometimes I think we need to have Stupid Jail. I'm sure there are those of you who would argue that all jail isstupid, but you're probably already serving time anyway, so your argument won't carry much weight.

Reporting: Midwife Amoeba
DIVIDING AMOEBAE GET A HELPING HAND - OR FOOT

by Mark Perew

SANATA ANA, Calif., March 22, 2001 -- Beatles aren't the only critters who can sing, "I get by with a little help from my friends." An amoeba in the act of dividing into two amoebae can get stuck, too.

Politics
SHEA HAILED BY L.A.P.D. CHIEF FOR 'COMMITMENT TO LEADERSHIP'

American Reporter Staff

LOS ANGELES, March 20, 2001 -- In rare praise for any political candidate, the Los Angeles Police Dept. today officially commended American Reporter Editor-in-Chief Joe Shea, a candidate for Mayor of Los Angeles in the city's April 10 primary election, for his "commitment to leadership" in calling for other mayoral candidates to leave any decision on the future of Los Angeles Police Chief Bernard C. Parks out of their political comments.

Ink Soup
SIMPLE, AND CLEAR

by Clarence Brown

SEATTLE, Wash. -- The new computer is installed and running. It took me most of the morning to set it up, but it will take me the rest of the week to believe that I did it.

Happy St. Patrick's Day!

Hominy & Hash: GREEN ROOTS

by Constance Dunn Daley

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Imagine! After six decades of pride in being born Irish in America, I discover I don't know a tinker's damn about being Irish at all, and yet I can't imagine a life as anything but Irish.

On Native Ground
THE DEMOCRATS: DEAD PARTY WALKING

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The Republican rout is on.

Make My Day: WHOSE FINGER IS THAT?

by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- People who know me know that I have an interest i= n things related to construction and woodworking. I enjoy learning about ne= w advances in those areas, and I'm willing to try just about anything as lo= ng as the end result isn't an electrical shock or explosion.

Media Beat: BAD NEWS BEARS CHANGE TONE OF MEDIA SCRIPT

by Norman Solomon

WASHINGTON -- When the Ameritrade company launched a $200 million marketing drive to explain the joys of online trading in autumn 1999, abarrage of TV commercials invited viewers to join in the fun. The news was bullish, and the firm's motto -- "Believe in yourself" - provided an upbeat message. Tech stocks led advances in self-affirmation.

LEIGH STEINBERG HAS A TAKE...ON EVERYTHING

by Steven Travers

SAN FRANCISCO -- Editor's Note: Steven Travers has worked with superagent Leigh Steinberg to help develop the Sports Movie Channel. Recently, Travers and Steinberg talked about sports, Hollywood, the Internet, and how the 21st Century will be connected by all of them.

American Sports
PRINCE RICHARD COULD SNAP THE CURVE BALL

by Steven Travers

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. -- He grew up next to Steve Lavin in Marin, has worked the craft of acting all over the world, and now he is a heartthrob to millions of TV fans.

SHOW ME THE ... UHH, MONEY!

by Erik Deckers

SYRACUSE, Ind. -- Well, 1975 was an impressionable year for me. That was the year I saw the classic shark movie, "Jaws." And thanks to the giant animatronic shark and Hollywood's portrayal of why you should never swim in anything bigger than a kid's wading pool, hundreds of thousands of Americans refuse to set foot in the ocean. And I, for one, don't blame them.

On Native Ground: PARDONS, INVESTIGATIONS AND A PARTY'S SPINELESSNESS

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- The uproar over former President Bill Clinton's pardons has been certainly justified. In giving a free pass to fugitive financier Marc Rich as a favor to a wealthy donor to the Democratic Party, Clinton has shown us all how the power game works in Washington.

First Person
AN A.R. CORRESPONDENT ARGUES BEFORE THE U.S. SUPREME COURT

by Thomas S. Kerrigan

LOS ANGELES, Feb. 28, 2001 -- Bundled up in a scarf and overcoat as I walked along Capitol Hill early Monday morning from my hotel - Washington, D.C. is cold in February; there had been snow on the ground the day I arrived - I went over my notes once more in my mind and wondered whether all the weeks of study and research had prepared for mefor the appearance that was only a few hours away, an appearance that was becoming more and more momentous in my mind.

...AS ANOTHER ASKS HIGH COURT FOR JUSTICE FOR WRITERS by Joyce Marcel

by Joyce Marcel

DUMMERSTON, Vt. -- Dear Ken Burns, Doris Kearns Goodwin, and other big-name, beloved and well-paid members of the liberal history Establishment: Please - and I say this in the spirit of friendly bipartisanship so prevalent everywhere - go to hell. Love, Joyce.

6.8 EARTHQUAKE INJURES 259 IN WASHINGTON STATE; SPARSE DAMAGE REPORTED American Reporter Staff

American Reporter Staff

SEATTLE, Wash., Feb. 29, 2001 -- From the Space Needle to Salt Lake City, the Pacific Northwest and beyond was shaken just before 11 a.m. (PST) Wednesday morning by a 6.8 earthquake that did some damage - especially to the region's aging brick buildings --and left two dozen people injured, three of them critically.

First American
ONE MAN'S 'FREE LAND' WAS ANOTHER'S IDENTITY by Steve Russell

by Steve Russell

SAN ANTONIO -- Next month, I will testify again in front of the Texas Legislature, and once again I will hear in my mind the unspoken question: What makes you an Indian?

On Native Ground: DALE EARNHARDT AND THE NEED FOR SPEED

by Randolph T. Holhut

DUMMERSTON, Vt., Feb. 24, 2001 -- Some people wonder why auto racing is the most popular spectator sport in the U.S. It's simple. Most of us can't dunk a basketball, hit a 90-mph fastball or run 100 meters in under 10 seconds. All of us drive cars.

Reporting: Nepal
NEPAL'S PARLIAMENTARY DEMOCRACY SAID TO BE IN DANGER

by Chiranjibi Paudyal

KATHMANDU, Nepal, Feb. 20 -- Nepal's parliament turned into a battlefield this week as members of the ruling and opposition parties started fist-fighting during parliamentary proceedings over the issue of Prime Minister Girija Prasad Koirala's resignation. Meanwhile, Nepal's king may try to assume direct rule over the parliamentary kingdom whenhe returns from a visit to China next week, sources have told The American Reporter.

An A.R. Analysis
AMERICAN SCIENTIST'S WORK ON SUPERCONDUCTORS IS IGNORED AMID ACCLAIM FOR JAPANESE ADVANCE

by Joe Shea

As scientists heap praise on Japanese scientists who have achieved resistance-free electrical conductivity at exotic temperatures in an inexpensive metal, an American scientist's discovery of negative resistance - a net gain in electrical output - in far cheaper superconducting carbon fiber composite materials, and at room temperature, has been ignored.

Market Mover: WHAT'S GOING DOWN AT UPS? NOT WARRICK by Mark Scheinbaum

by Mark Scheinbaum

LAKE WORTH, Fla. -- We were jawboning around the office about theultimate "contrarian" plays in a declining stock market, and frankly UPS-- the old United Parcel Service never was mentioned.

Caring
THE JOY OF SHABBAT

by Cindy Hasz

SAN DIEGO -- It's Friday night and I just realized with a Mona Lisa grin that I'm doing that "Shabbat" thing again. Though from my blue beanie-and-oxford-clad days I've been a devout Catholic girl, I find the Jewish Sabbath makes eminent, organic sense to me. It's that high holy time for ritual.

Copyright 2016 Joe Shea The American Reporter. All Rights Reserved.